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I had a look for my Dublo catalogs and found 2 neither of which shows a complete layout at all one has a lot of stock and maybe the last before they started 2 rail but they are a bit worn and may have a page or two missing, thought I had a book as well, tons of stuff on Triang Hornby and even others, anyway I might yet come up with something.
 

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I should mention, as it's not at first obvious from the plans, that the raised section on the smaller of the two is simply an oval of track which is at a constant height and unconnected to the lower track...
Which we might add has the appearance of not having been fully thought through. Surely more (girder) bridges required to take it across the low level tracks into the station, and over the loco siding buffer stops and the like? (Perhaps that's why it never got constructed, six digit man wasn't given all the necessary pieces. ;))
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
This example is from 1963 and, although it is two rail and the raised sections are constructed using Hornby-acHo parts from Meccano's French factory*, it does have an elevated section with a girder bridge:

20194


* The French produced raised section parts were, I believe, marketed also in the UK, but not for very long. I recall reading (in Michael Foster's book I think) that the TPO and the crane had difficulty in certain circumstances negotiating the curved pieces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
six digit man
For the benefit of those who are still trying to figure out what that was all about, count the fingers "Dad" has in this piece of Dublo advertising literature:

20195


Which we might add has the appearance of not having been fully thought through. Surely more (girder) bridges required to take it across the low level tracks into the station, and over the loco siding buffer stops and the like? (Perhaps that's why it never got constructed.............
Six finger man may not have done it, but Meccano employee Bob Moy (who designed most, if not all of the Dublo plans) did:

20196
 

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Yes very effective and looks very well, my father had lights on some of his layout and it looked well, my wiring is a bit of a spagetti mess so I have limited my ambitions to electrify everything. Anyway well done and please post more pics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Well, when I started this layout, I decided I would keep it simple, say, two feeds, a few supplementary feeds and some isolating sections and that would be it. Then I decided that I would use electric signals and, for parts of the layout not easily reached, electric points and uncouplers. I also wired a couple of ammeters into the circuit to keep an eye on the current consumption of the locos (after all, most of them are around 60 to 70 years old). Then came the decision to install lighting.

The wiring was meant to be simple, as I had never wired up anything more complex than fiddle yard to terminus layouts before, but I ended up with this:

Wood Beam Ceiling Tints and shades Hardwood


The two loose wires hanging down at the end are not something I forgot, by the way, they are wires for the lights in the station car park - something I hadn't thought about adding until I started putting in the lights so, of course, I didn't have anything to connect them to.....

Jim
 

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Hi Jim,
Yours looks extremely tidy compared to mine. Here's a short video of the wiring on the underside of the baseboard on the original part of my layout, it then moves up to a control section just below the
layout level, where the programming track is, showing the Roco modules for points and signals, and the digikeijs feedback modules. Admittedly, a lot of the wiring needs tidying up as there are still elements not connected, but still doesn't include any control or lighting wiring to my recent extension to the layout which so far only has the BUS cables run around it. Although it looks messy in places, mostly due to lack of space at the module locations, everything is labeled up and I have used a colour coding system to hopefully allow me to trace cables if anything goes wrong.


I seem to remember at the onset of DCC , reading somewhere that it cut down on all the wiring of a conventional DC layout. Not quite sure what was meant by that :)
Regards
Alan
 

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...I seem to remember at the onset of DCC , reading somewhere that it cut down on all the wiring of a conventional DC layout. Not quite sure what was meant by that ...
It surely does, if the layout wiring scheme is well designed. But it is only a reduction, not an elimination.

Major difficulty is that there is no track system designed to fully integrate with DCC. This means that if motor actuated points are to be used a completely separate wiring scheme is required to each point motor. It doesn't have to be like this, but no track manufacturer has made the necessary development leap AFAIK...
 

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Yeah good point 34c so my fiddle yard is 30 points so that is 3 wires each so straight off 90 wires then the various feeds and some are electrofrog then 100 is passed easily then there are the wires just passing through to feed electrofrogs elsewhere, it gets so sometimes I abandon a line to rewire the thing to ensure I get the right ones wired up. I use Peco tabs as it is quick and reliable as other systems are slow and cumbersome. I did start wiring up to the Z21 but realised how slow this all was so gave up on that idea.
 

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no track manufacturer has made the necessary development leap AFAIK...
As some will know, I am using Rocoline with track ballast for my shelf layout. These points have live frogs and in the embedded track, they are already wired to switch polarity when the point changes. The points are non isolating so both roads are always live.
Roco make a DCC controlled solenoid point motor which fits into a space under the ballast. This has three wires. Two are attached to fishplates which I connect to the heel of the point. The third wire has a clip which you attach to one rail to put it into programming mode. Once done you disconnect it, fold it under the base and that's it.
I have motorised four points so far.
I prefer slow action motors to solenoids but for ease of installation this is hard to beat. When using the route setting feature of the Z21, I do sometimes have to ask twice or change the point manually to get what I want.

So long as the fishplates continue to make good connections, the four wires I have from the Z21 will be enough. Two of those wires are for the programming track.

Adding other DCC controlled accessories such as uncouplers or signals will add wires and boxes.


David
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Well, I now have a selection of lights to hand that I purchased on eBay ages ago - they have arrived after having been put on a slow boat from China. Once I get around to it, I will have lights in the station forecourt, the goods yard, goods shed, engine shed and associated sidingsand the Queensland Railways (I know it's out of place, but I couldn't resist it) cream shed.
 
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