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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I presume this is a perennial question - how do others out there control the huge quantities of dust that any layout attracts? Is there a magic solution? Will I spend the rest of my life hoovering scenery?
 

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On my previous layout I used dustsheets that would simplay be rolled back when I wanted to play on it. Every summer they would be carefully rolled up, taken out to the garden and then beat on the washing line to get the dust off.

The new layout will require a few 'extras' to ensure that the dust sheets cover the forest area, but the same technique will be used.

Regards,

Dan
 

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I have a very nice room that is kept very clean. No animals or through traffic. Virtually dust-free. I can leave locos on the layout for months without any dust at all.

I do have a vac connected at all times that is part of my tool kit. I vacuum up debris from a modelling job before it blows away.
 

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This is my solution. A totally enclosed layout. I just close the lid when I'm finished.



 

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Hi Mike,

Thanks for bringing this topic up, it's been a question I've been asking myself before I commit my time and money to a housekeeping nightmare! I keep wondering how much of the grass is gonna go up the vacumn hose over the life of the layout. If anybody can venture what they got right, or admit what they got wrong, I would be grateful to be advised.

In fact a pinned header of what's a "winner" and what's a "boo boo" in regards to all the modelling facets would be a great resource for newbies. Maybe a poll on "my top ten einstein moments and my top ten blunders" ?

Anyways I'm still not sure of how I am going to keep my layout ***** and span. (Hmmm does Noch produce an antistatic grass
)(AHHH an einstein moment
)

Cheers, Bluey
 

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QUOTE (Mike H. @ 7 Dec 2008, 03:24) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I presume this is a perennial question - how do others out there control the huge quantities of dust that any layout attracts? Is there a magic solution? Will I spend the rest of my life hoovering scenery?

*** Some practical solutions:

**Don't do carpentry and similar work in the layout room. Its inconveneint to cut elsewhere, but easier to live with dust wise. Clean up immeiadtely and mess is created, and vacuum track after cleaning. I have a lightweight shoulder-carry 700 watt hoover that was very cheap and is easy to use - Plus a set of nozzles usually sold fr cleaning computer keyboards etc... I use it for vacuuming around the layout and with a new filter installed, for removing excess ballast etc for recovery. A cheap and invaluable tool.

**Get some of those totally useless cheap plastic sheets sold in discount hardware stores as protection for the floor when painting - they are hopeless as floor protection as they wrap round the feet and tear easily, but very light so can cover the layout without scenery damage between sessions.

MOST helpful long term....

**Have positive air pressure in the layout room. A 12" fan on and blowing INTO the room constantly with a dust filter on the intake will keep the room pressure very slightly higher than the rest of the house so dust will not enter... If there is also a vent that is smaller than the fan opening it will not create an airflow pattern that encourages floating dust to exit rather than settle. Low in the doorway or low in a wall away from the layout would be a useful position....

**If positive pressure isn't an option, seal around doors and anywhere that dust can enter. Vacuum the room very regularly.

Richard
 

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Carpet is an absolute killer, unless you can use one of the synthetic high wear resistance commercial floor coverings. A vinyl flooring is much better, and easier to find the inevitable small dropped components on.

It is worth thinking about your clothing. Animal fibre, and wool in particular, sheds continuously. Better to wear a fleece then woollens, if warmth is necessary.

Don't wear outside footwear into the railway room. Of all items of exterior clothing you wear, these carry the vast maority of the dirt load you acquire when out and about. Reserve some clean footwear for the railway room.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Many thanks for all the replies, especially the advice not to wear dirty shoes into the loft, and to try to maintain positive air pressure. It's actually not too bad at the moment - but my layout is just painted wood, baseboards and track ... it's when the trees and vegetation come along that the dust monster will strike I fear.
 
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