Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, my first post after an 'intro' post.

My N gauge layout will be set in the early-emblem BR period but I'm not sure on a few points. Basically...

1) Early experimental blue livery - how long did this last?

2) Would you have seen the blue livery with the blood&custard livery on coaches?

3) Graham Farish Pullmans - out of production now but occasionally floating around on ebay. What might these have run with? I understand that the new Bachmann MkI Pullmans were confined to the East Coast (so I read) but the Grafar ones look like earlier versions (or perhaps they aren't prototypical?). Where would these have run and would they have run behind a blue loco?

4) Finally, private owner coal wagons - I've read about these being withdrawn in the BR years but when did this happen? I think the steel mineral wagons came along in the early 50s but I wasn't sure if I was 'allowed' to run private owner wagons behind early emblem BR locos or if this wouldn't have actually happened.

I'm not after a completely prototypical look, I've always been more in the 'about right' camp.

Thanks for any help,
Dave.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Dave
1.Experimental blue was introduced in 1948 and began to be withdrawn in 1951,although I am aware that it was still carried in certain instances as late as 1956.It was intended to last for five years but was very hard to match when partial repaints were required following repairs etc resulting in a patchy appearance.The Western region despised it and I for one agree with them.
2.Yes
3.Pass on this one,not a pullman expert !!
4.They were nationalised in 1948,however they lasted with private owner logos (usually in a pretty deplorable state) in certain cases for some years after (you will be able to find photographic evidence of this fairly easily).
Hope this helps
Regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
Dave,

The use of pristine private owner liveried wagons with BR liveried locs is a no-no for me. In fact PO wagons were pooled during the war and Nationalisation took place about 6 years later. They were already in a bad state when they were pooled, so by 1948 most were patched, dirty and unkempt. Often they were patched with unpainted planks, others received a coat of paint that quickly wore off and the old PO liveries showed through.

I suggest that you have a look at the illustrations on the Robbies Rolling Stock web site at http://www.robbiesrollingstock.co.uk/Scruffies.htm.

Another source of inspiration is "The 4mm Wagon Part one" by Geoff Kent if you want to have a go yourself.

The fact is that I never noticed any PO wagons in their original liveries, well weathered or not in the mid 50s when I was trainspotting around York. All I remember is tatty grey.

So if you want to have an authentic looking railway for the 50s, then stay off the PO liveried wagons.

Colombo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
The Graham Farish Pullmans are the matchboard type (at least the one sitting in front of me is!). This should allow you to run them on several trains such as the Golden Arrow and Bournemouth Belle (the latter having been run with a BR blue liveried Merchant Navy loco).

Regards,

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Dave
You can still run them,just have them heavily weathered and patched,I'm sure any professional weatherer worth his salt if you advise of the period you wish to model will be able to convert P.O pristine finished wagons to the finish that would be required.
Regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
QUOTE (35008 Orient Line @ 22 Jan 2006, 14:59)You can still run them,just have them heavily weathered and patched,I'm sure any professional weatherer worth his salt if you advise of the period you wish to model will be able to convert P.O pristine finished wagons to the finish that would be required.
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Why not pick up a cheap second-hand P.O. wagon and have a practice yourself?,weathering your own wagons can be very satisfying,get a prototype photo and work from that to get the correct effect,rememeber to add the BR P-prefix number and tare weight on black patches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
QUOTE The fact is that I never noticed any PO wagons in their original liveries, well weathered or not in the mid 50s when I was trainspotting around York. All I remember is tatty grey.
Or filthy brown or a disgusting non-descript mixture of the two, the name of which no one dares to print!

This mirrors my memories exactly, too. Perhaps it depends on where one spent the 50s. I have NEVER seen a pretty PO wagon anywhere on the East Coast, between Edinburgh and London, but I imagine they may have been floating around elsewhere on the island - the North East ain't the most pictureskew part of Britland
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
Someone ought to be able to produce a picture of a PO wagon in a 1950s train in the NE, its Sod's law, but they have not yet done so. This is probably because the NER had a monopoly of coal deliveries and used there own wagons, the LNER was no different in the NE and BR(NE) just carried on.

It is said that there is a prototype for everything and if you look hard enough, you will find it. The one wagon goods train, passenger stock in goods trains, diesel shunters marshalled in goods trains for delivery and a Southern Region green set at York on a regular basis spring to mind.

However there is one that I could hardly believe when I saw it. In the NRM they have decided to depict a loaded mineral wagon, so they have made a large board to fit into the full size wagon about a third of the way down, painted it black and stuck coal on it. Where did they get that idea from?

Picture please.

Colombo
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top