Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone wired Eckon signals for DCC using a LS150 or any other accessory decoder for that matter.

How did you power them as they say only 12 v dc?

I was thinking of using a couple of these however if it's too hard to set them up functionaly I may stick with semaphore.
 

·
No Longer Active.
Joined
·
13,319 Posts
QUOTE (neil_s_wood @ 2 Nov 2008, 05:52) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Has anyone wired Eckon signals for DCC using a LS150 or any other accessory decoder for that matter.

How did you power them as they say only 12 v dc?

I was thinking of using a couple of these however if it's too hard to set them up functionaly I may stick with semaphore.

Should'nt be a problem using the correct sized resistors - if I remember correctly they need dimming down anyway.

The guy that started the company AFAIR was called Colin Hatcher & may very well be still in charge/ownership. I always found him very helpful - may be worth sending him an e-mail.
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
QUOTE (neil_s_wood @ 2 Nov 2008, 14:52) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Has anyone wired Eckon signals for DCC using a LS150 or any other accessory decoder for that matter.

How did you power them as they say only 12 v dc?

I was thinking of using a couple of these however if it's too hard to set them up functionaly I may stick with semaphore.

Neil, you cannot use an LS150 without a little help - it has no permanent on ability for colour light signals.

To get LED signals to stay lit with an LS150 you need to add MASTERswitch which will take care of the LEDs for you (you won't even need a resistor on the Eckon signals as MS is already fitted with them)

Richard
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 2 Nov 2008, 19:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Neil, you cannot use an LS150 without a little help - it has no permanent on ability for colour light signals.

To get LED signals to stay lit with an LS150 you need to add MASTERswitch which will take care of the LEDs for you (you won't even need a resistor on the Eckon signals as MS is already fitted with them)

Richard

So adding the resistors would take care of the 12v dc aspect?

Do you have a wiring diagram for how to do that Richard?
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
QUOTE (neil_s_wood @ 3 Nov 2008, 06:23) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>So adding the resistors would take care of the 12v dc aspect?

Do you have a wiring diagram for how to do that Richard?

*** If you are talking about how to add a resistor to an LED then it simply goes in line with the anode/positive LED lead of each LED. The correct resistor value will depend on the LED type and the actual supply voltage you use.

If you are talking about adding another LED to a signal which already has resistance built in, then it only needs to drop the voltage difference between the 12v recommended and the actual supply voltage.

To calculate the resistance you need to use ohms law which is in simple terms, amps = voltage divided by resistance.

But: you ideally need to know the power dissipation of the LED - I doubt eckon actually mention it but most reds are about 5mA (can anywhere between 2 and 7.5mA for a standard brightness 3mm red LED)

If your LED is 5mA and you need to drop all of the added 3 volts between 12 and 15v then... is voltage divided by current = resistance

which is 3 / .005 = 600 or 5mA = 3v / 600 ohms.
or
3 / .005 = 600.

If there are NO resistors already supplied or fitted then just use anywhere between 1k and 2k ohms - it'll be fine.

As a convenient option, signals are usually too bright as supplied anyway - try powering them with a 9 volt mobile phone charger. (and any resistor as supplied of course)

how are you going to switch them / power them?

Richard
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 3 Nov 2008, 13:40) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>*** If you are talking about how to add a resistor to an LED then it simply goes in line with the anode/positive LED lead of each LED. The correct resistor value will depend on the LED type and the actual supply voltage you use.

If you are talking about adding another LED to a signal which already has resistance built in, then it only needs to drop the voltage difference between the 12v recommended and the actual supply voltage.

To calculate the resistance you need to use ohms law which is in simple terms, amps = voltage divided by resistance.

But: you ideally need to know the power dissipation of the LED - I doubt eckon actually mention it but most reds are about 5mA (can anywhere between 2 and 7.5mA for a standard brightness 3mm red LED)

If your LED is 5mA and you need to drop all of the added 3 volts between 12 and 15v then... is voltage divided by current = resistance

which is 3 / .005 = 600 or 5mA = 3v / 600 ohms.
or
3 / .005 = 600.

If there are NO resistors already supplied or fitted then just use anywhere between 1k and 2k ohms - it'll be fine.

As a convenient option, signals are usually too bright as supplied anyway - try powering them with a 9 volt mobile phone charger. (and any resistor as supplied of course)

how are you going to switch them / power them?

Richard
I had hoped to switch them using the ECos via an accessory decoder.

Power supply I'm still looking for something 12v or below.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top