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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having rounded up what model railway items I feel that I am able to use from my parents' house, I have for sometime been attempting to plan my layout.

When we get around to it (money wise), I plan to use the loft having a layout based on a preserved railway. But in the mean time I am planning a small layout based in the mid 60's at a branch line terminus that will take apart and store under the spare bed (plenty of room, it's a double). My wife says that she can provide the "railway cats" - four of them.


I have found a number of Parkside and Cambrian kits that I have built, but not painted, so I have been thinking about liveries, and then weathering!!! I must have thought about this sometime back as I seem to have bought a load or Railmatch paint.


So this week I have spent some time weathering an old Hornby 110, replacing the speed whiskers with a yellow warning panel, and adding some dirt and rust. Not to sure if I have over done the dirt, but still, it is my first attempt







As I said, I my have over did the dirt!


Granted that the photo's maynot be the best in the world but....

All that is left to do is convert it to DCC and add lights - could be a while off yet


Any comments welcome

Thanks to pedromorgn for his help and advice on how to upload the photo's


Ian
 

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They look used! I cant comment further because mine are not weathered yet but it looks ok to me
I'm worried about weathering because the painting I've done looks a bit thick,close up it resembles artex so Im getting an airbrush and compressor.
 

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QUOTE (frame69 @ 12 Mar 2009, 15:58) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm worried about weathering because the painting I've done looks a bit thick,

You really must stop using that 3" brush Andy!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Ian hi,

I do not want to discourage you but honestly it looks more like painted rather than weathered.

Some advice; practice/experiment your weathering on cheapish boxcars first. Always have a photo of the prototype in front of you. Examine it very carefully. Airbrushing is a method but try water based acrylics first, using soft brushes, try to dull the shinny plastic of the loco/carriage. Use weathering powders for the last touch. And most of all be patient. At the end you will notice the progress you have made.

For fine examples of weathering check out:

http://modeltrainsweathered.com/

to enter the site perform: username:mtw password:enter

Once you get the grip of it, you'll be an addict of weathering.

Best of luck

Baykal
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Gents,

I appreciate your points. But like I said it's my first go at it - things can only get better (I hope!!!!
).

Baykal,- I'll be spending rest of my week off looking at the web site you reccomend - Thanks


Andy, - 3" brush now stored in kitchen bin!!!!!!!

I know it my sound like a bit of an excuse but the DMU looks better then the photo's (but granted, not much better!!!)

Ian
 

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Ian,

Here is a very good example of what I mean. A Br24 of which I use as reference to my weathering.



Try to absorb all the effects seen in the photo.(Skip the lanterns.) There are so many points to consider in this photo.Look how the oil has flowed down on the tank car. Check where all the dust has accumulated on the loco etc..

...and never ever use flashes during taking your pictures.

Hope this helps and feel free to ask any questions.

Baykal
 

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another useful tip is that weathering generally runs down things not across them, unless it is the ddirt along the skirts of passenger coaches.

John
 

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Hi Ian

Welldone on your first attempt at weathering, it can feel a little scary can't it lol

have you thought about using weathering powders, I use the Tamiya one, easy to use, and give a nice effect.

This is my new THompson B1, and I weathered it last night, to make it look more used, simple to use, and then finished it off with a spray of matt varnish



hope that may give you some help

definitley agree with what the others have said though, knowing where thinks leak etc helps to add those extra details :)
 

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I can only agree with Baykal - nothing beats looking at the real thing. In my experience quite often less is more when weathering.

BUT - don't be discouraged.

Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OK - Update,

Spent last night painting two Cambrian kits (1 Catfish, 1 Dogfish) in mat black with white handrails and handles. Spent today looking at photo's in the internet (did go down to the local railway yard today - but not many wagons about, must keep looking on my days off next week!!
)

So this evening having read what advice you have all offered me i'll be having another go at "lightly weathering", must keep looking at the photo's, but have found lots of them to look at.

Ian
 

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nice 1st attempts mate . plenty people will help you out on this site
will be trying some weathering myself just bought 4 model power 40' gondola wagons HO intend spraying ews (db shencker) colours might not be spot on for uk traffic but as it will be modern era layout and it's mine, think i will get away with it
just sprayed up a class 66 but looks a poor job so will strip and start again
 

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Hi Ian

If you are weathering using the drybrushing effect then I can help you! I don't know if you do know how to do it but this is the way I do it.

Take a flat Humbrol No- 6/8 brush, Dip it into the desired paint and then with a kitchen towel between your thumb and forfinger drag the brush throughit and most of the paint will come off!
Then you can start by flicking the paintbrush over the raised ares of the loco's bogie detail, This method should ensure you do a bit at a time and remember to look at photograhs of the class of loco if you can't find the actual loco you are doing!! (The weathering effect should be the same)

Have a look at my signature picture of my 37 for some idea.

Please if you want any more help or if you would like me to put a picture of one of my loco's then just ask!

Kind regards

Paul
 

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I have tried weathering with water based poster paint, mainly wagons and coaches. I use the same method as wet weathering with Humbrol etc. i.e. mix the paint, dip in the brush, wipe brush on a piece of card, wipe brush on a piece of cloth or towel and then off you go with light brush strokes.. Try not to put too much on at once, and if you run a drop of water from your brush downwards it looks fine. The ony problem is when you pick them up it can rub off a bit. I have weathered a Black 5 with it and altho' not very good at least it will wash off. I think trial and error will improve results.
 

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Hi peter,

a lot depends on how often you handle your stock. I just weather and leave it. it falls on to the track bed which is perfectly normal and I just reapply as necessary.

John
 

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Ian and for that matter anybody else,as I have said in another thread, if you are into weathering British Outline models, then in "Modeltrainswheathered" website go to the section "International weatherers showcase", check all the weathering of the Brit. which goes by the nick "Pugsley".
He explains his methods as he goes along. Truly first class weathering worth checking.

Baykal
 

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QUOTE I have tried weathering with water based poster paint, mainly wagons and coaches. I use the same method

Thanks, Patrick. That sounds like what I need to do. I have water-colours and gouache (which is similar to poster colours).

As a child I repainted my Princess Elizabeth in maroon (using Humbrol paints), but eventually washed it off with thinners - or was it turps? can't remember. Washing it off like that didn't seem to do any harm, but as I've got water-based paints (also oils and acrylics, but I think they would be rather more permanent) it would be nice to use them for 'removable weathering.'
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hi all,

Thanks for your continued addvice and support


As I said yesterday been having a go at a Catfish and a Dogfish.









I've being using Railmatch paint for this i.e. light rust, dark rust, frame dirt, and brake dust.

Again pohot's not brill, but should give a good idea!!!


Read madon37's dry brush advice, and whilst on the phoned my mate has told me about an artical in March's Railway Modeler about this as well. So thanks Paul, if I still struggle with it my need to go and find a copy of this . Also been looking at Model Trains Weathered site that ebaykal recomeneded, so agin thanks Baykal.

So now 3 more Dogfish, 2 more Catfish, a Shark and ......... What?????


Wife just told me the Kitchen and dinning room also need painting


Well ladies and gents.... lets do the trains first


Any thoughts on any weathering improvements to the wagons, please let me know.

Ian
 

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Hi Ian,

Go to www.migproductions .com You will find lots of tips and tricks on their forum as well as many pictures.

Although I am in the hobby for quite some time I have only recently started to do some serious weathering. Be warned! -it can become addictive but it is not life threatening. I have used the MIG pigments for some time now and had excellent results with it.

Enjoy your hobby.

Kind regards.

Johan
 
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