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Ian hi,

I do not want to discourage you but honestly it looks more like painted rather than weathered.

Some advice; practice/experiment your weathering on cheapish boxcars first. Always have a photo of the prototype in front of you. Examine it very carefully. Airbrushing is a method but try water based acrylics first, using soft brushes, try to dull the shinny plastic of the loco/carriage. Use weathering powders for the last touch. And most of all be patient. At the end you will notice the progress you have made.

For fine examples of weathering check out:

http://modeltrainsweathered.com/

to enter the site perform: username:mtw password:enter

Once you get the grip of it, you'll be an addict of weathering.

Best of luck

Baykal
 

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Ian,

Here is a very good example of what I mean. A Br24 of which I use as reference to my weathering.



Try to absorb all the effects seen in the photo.(Skip the lanterns.) There are so many points to consider in this photo.Look how the oil has flowed down on the tank car. Check where all the dust has accumulated on the loco etc..

...and never ever use flashes during taking your pictures.

Hope this helps and feel free to ask any questions.

Baykal
 

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Ian and for that matter anybody else,as I have said in another thread, if you are into weathering British Outline models, then in "Modeltrainswheathered" website go to the section "International weatherers showcase", check all the weathering of the Brit. which goes by the nick "Pugsley".
He explains his methods as he goes along. Truly first class weathering worth checking.

Baykal
 
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