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Those prices send out entirely the wrong message.

That railway modelling is a rich mans hobby.

Is there any news at all from the continental toy fair that suggests that railway modelling is a hobby for the masses?

Unfortuneately I doubt it.

This is the area where the continent appears to be totally out of step with the UK (and the USA?). However for nearly all wanabees thinking about the hobby it is a most significant consideration.

Until the continent stop producing models at fantasy prices then there will be little to interest UK modellers.

Maybe this is why the UK hobby market is enjoying relative success.

Happy modelling
Gary

This post refers to some new product pricing from the Nuremberg Toy Fair.

Dennis
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It was more the accessories that were of concern. The Heljan UK outline stuff is reasonable value considering the work that goes into the model. However if Heljan were selling a "Class 26" type model to the Germans then what chance it being £125 or more?

The hobby in Germany is clearly for the professional classes in work unless German pensioners are very well off indeed.

My own personal experience of the hobby in the UK based on the large number of modellers I am aquainted with is that there seem to be a very high proportion of retired modellers for whom pennies count. I am total in my conviction that we should have value products in the UK as I'll be retired one day!

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
QUOTE Now I would have thought an inside framed chassis 08 would be more difficult to construct than an M7 yet it will probably retail at £65. It only has coupling rods! Is the driver gold plated? Profit per unit must be huge on M7 compared to 08.

The M7 is going to be Hornby's first superdetailed tank loco.

Best not to pass judgement on any model until it has been released. Also take into account that Hornby are likely to sell a lot more Class 08/09's than they are M7's. This all has to be factored in presumably. And let us also not forget that the N gauge example of this model sells for similar money! Hornby are going to have to sell a lot of M7's to get their rumoured £150,000 tooling costs back. And then there are productions costs on top!


Happy modelling
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
QUOTE I hate to worry you further but I've read that motorola are planning to open a plant in India, home of such wonderful products as the Mahindra jeep, Tata Gurkha and worst of all the short lived and virtually worthless now City rover

Just done a search in Autotrader and there are plenty of City Rovers for sale for over £4000. Maybe not such a good example to use!


Happy modelling
Gary
 

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The Hornby Sanda Kan production facility may be in China however the owners are American.

Don't know about Kadar (Bachmann). They seem to have Chinese connections and are a bit more secretive from an ownership point of view.

Lets think about this.

It requires about 5 times the amount of labour by time to put a current superdetailed Hornby model together than it did to produce a Flying Scotsman of the 1970's complete with moulded handrails.

Now if current versions of A3's were produced in the UK what would the RRP be?


Higher or lower than £150?


And would the quality threshold be higher or lower or the same?


And if the A3 was £150 with a "Made in Britain" moulded on the bottom would we buy?


Do we value "Made in Britain" any more?


Dapol promote this fact heavily.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
QUOTE Per Gary "The M7 is going to be Hornby's first superdetailed tank loco." I thought this was the Fowler 2-6-4T. About £10 cheaper I think , despite more complicated valve gear . Also my original comment stands - it can't be more complicated to construct than the 08.

If memory serves me correct the Fowler was a new body on a reworked existing chassis and using some of the previous detailing parts. Until the M7 is released nobody can really pass comment and make comparisons with existing models. What would it take to justify an £80 RRP in your opinion?


Happy modelling
Gary
 

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QUOTE Actually thats the point. I would find it hard to justify £80 for a simple tank locomotive

Now the Euro modellers have to constantly justify £100 to £150 for a simple tank loco. Why is it so hard to justify this for a Hornby model?


Hornby are possibly moving into uncharted waters with detail previously unseen on UK outline and there appears to be a move into uncharted waters on the RRP front also.

Remember that the old M7 had an opening smoke box door and boiler detail and a glow in the firebox in the cab. Are Hornby about to better this?


And if Hornby can reproduce the slow running qualities of the Class 08 in the M7 then it will definitely be a treat!

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
I'm not at all surprised as its a great little collectable to own if you can find one that is undamaged with the boiler door still on its hinge. It was one of Hornby's best sellers when originally released and so holds a lot of memories for a lot of todays grown up modellers. Every Model Rail Forum member should own a Triang M7!

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Something else to think about. I have checked UK inflation statistics and something today should be priced at around 11 times what it was in 1968. An M7 in 1968 was around the £3 mark. So the same model if sold today would be around £33.

Flying Scotsman then was around £5.50 so it should sell today for about £60.

It actually sells for about £80.

Now think about how it compares with the very first Flying Scotsman.

Todays Flying Scotsman is absolutely remarkable value when the comparison is made.

Evening Star when first released was about £8. Now 10 times this is £80. The last Hornby super detailed version could be picked up for less money!

A double straight section of track then was about 16p so it should sell today for about £1.75. It actually sells for significantly less!

This hobby is possibly giving better value now for each pound spent than it did in the late 1960's!

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
To be honest double00 you could be right.

However its up to manufacturers to not give the rivet counters the excuse.

I think its general commercial practice to gently lower prices on shelf items until stock is finally cleared. Things average out over the shelf life of the product from a retail perspective. Some items take longer to shift than others.

However, once an item is absolutely sold out then everybody wants it and Ebay prices skyrocket as it then has a rarity value! There is one dealer I know who only sells Hornby and Bachmann items 2 years after he has had the stock delivered. And he does rather well selling for about 10% above RRP!


Of course in the ideal world all stock is sold within days of arrival at RRP.

Happy modelling
Gary
 
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