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Hi,
Coal and stone seem to be very well catered for in the vast variety of wagons available for the '60 and '70's period but does anyone know which type of wagons were used for the movement of grain and flour.
(and any manufacturers/stockists would be helpful info )
I am thinking of putting in a flour mill instead of the usual coal mine or quarry!
Duztee
 

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What an intersting idea! I do agree that stone and coal seem to be predominant.
I think flower was carried in box wagons. Dapol make some suitable kits and Hornby should do.
I'll try finding whether Bachmann make any.
Regards,
Ben
 

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Bachmann have recently extended their range of box vans to include various versions with various liveries.
So you have ventilated vans in BR Bauxite, BR Grey and GWR Dark grey, fruit vans in GWR Grey and BR Bauxite, MOGO vans (with end doors) GWR and BR, and 'Planked' ventilated vans in LMS Grey and BR Bauxite - these latter two have sliding doors as opposed to the hinged doors.

There are only three versions available from Hornby, one of which is in a relatively modern 'freight-liner' livery.

Regards,
John Webb
 

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Grain will be moved to your mill in hopper wagons. There is an under-length model from Dapol of the BR 20 ton 'Covgrain' derived from the ancient Hornby/Wrenn tooling, and Bachmann occasionally offer the BRT 35 ton hopper which appeared circa 1965. Parkside have a kit of the LNER wooden hopper van, and there is a very good but expensive etched kit for the Covgrain, manufacturers name escaping me at present.
 

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QUOTE (34C @ 13 Jun 2008, 12:06) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Grain will be moved to your mill in hopper wagons. There is an under-length model from Dapol of the BR 20 ton 'Covgrain' derived from the ancient Hornby/Wrenn tooling, and Bachmann occasionally offer the BRT 35 ton hopper which appeared circa 1965. Parkside have a kit of the LNER wooden hopper van, and there is a very good but expensive etched kit for the Covgrain, manufacturers name escaping me at present.

There was also the old Tri-ang hopper (green with a roof I believe). I don't know which vehicle it represented but it was fitted with steam roller wheels with flat ended axles through the axleboxes. Some examples were fitted with a drop down door operated by some kind of gubbins at track level.

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The original Triang Grain wagon was model number R215. Introduced 1958 in green and was grey by 1960. Survived until 1968, but from 1966 onwards did not have the operating unloading mechanism. (Ramp on a section of track, for Britho's information!)

It was replaced by the 'Whisky Wagon' R647,8,9 & 650 depending on distillery livery. Made in Austria by Trix for Triang-Hornby for a couple of years and then in the UK by Rovex. They did not have an unloading mechanism. Withdrawn around 1974.

Reissued as R238 and R023 in 1986 to 88 and 1989-1992 respectively in different liveries to the earlier ones.

(Information from various volumes of Pat Hammond's history of Triang/Hornby.)

Regards,
John Webb
 

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QUOTE (BRITHO @ 13 Jun 2008, 11:56) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>There was also the old Tri-ang hopper (green with a roof I believe). I don't know which vehicle it represented but it was fitted with steam roller wheels with flat ended axles through the axleboxes. Some examples were fitted with a drop down door operated by some kind of gubbins at track level.
I had totally forgotten that, despite owning a couple and the unloading gubbins. Well, we did live within occasional smell range of the Nabisco 'Shredded Wheat' factory, which boasted this very type of rail served grain unloading operation. The most striking feature of the real hoppers was their usually appalling exterior condition. Heavy corrosion on the covgrains, bleached and peeling paint on the wooden hoppers, and very dirty overall.
 

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I did once see a CGO Grain hopper , though traffic to the ABM malt kiln in Louth used normally to move in 12T vans until closure in 1980. There is an etched kit which I bought at a show a couple of years ago but haven't dared to attempt yet . I can't remember who did it either but he was at said show and I think it was the 2nd or 3rd kit in his range. The Wrenn (ex Hornby Dublo) hopper is too short and some rather demanding work wold be required to cut it into sections and splice in additional length

The ex LNER hoppers look like a van externally - I think they were out of mainline traffic by about 1970.

I think the ex Trix moulds for the BRT "whisky blues" are now with Bachmann who have re-run them. As the name suggests these were very much for grain flows to the Scottish distilleries, and I think they had gone by about 1980

In the 70s and 80s grain traffic from E.Anglia to the ports in the days of EEC grain mountains and intervention store was largely in airbreaked Grainflow wagons - Lima did the PAA 4 wheel hopper - a slightly larger version of the whisky blues , though Hornby have not reissued it. I have 2 from an old layout : the pedistal suspension is too long and reducining it to correct ride heighht is covered in Ian Rice's Morill Handbook 1 Detailing RTR Wagons - an excellent book if you can find a copy.

There were also the Polybulks - big bogie hoppers , I think built in France whose TOPS code eludes me .Operated by Grainflow (in green ) sand someone else - Cerestar? in white /blue stripes livery. After the traffic was lost in the early 90s? I believe they went to France , though a few re-appeared in Britain a couple of years back on an experimental grain traffic flow. I have a feeling Jouef made an HO model , which I seem to recall some modern image modellers using in the absence of another model. Memory also suggests someone has since done this as a 4mm model

I've not seen the Bachmann 12T vans in the flesh but photos look good and others have been suitably impressed. Some modellers believe a slightly more refined result can be achieved by building a Parkside kit - these are some of their newer kits as they retooled these items a couple of years back - but there's very little in it , and if you need vans in quantity , Bachmann is certainly the quicker route

The Hornby BR vanwide is way too short and should be ignored. However their ex SR/GW vans are fine. Unfortunately pre nationalisation vans did not survive the introduction of TOPS in 1972-4: this generated operating efficiencies that reduced the wagon fleet by 60% and the older vehicles were wiped out

MOGOs and fruit vans are slightly different animals and unlike ordinary 12T vans , I wouldn't have expected them to be used in these traffics
 

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The BTC film - "Train Time" - shows seasonal vegetables being moved from the West Country up to London in just about any wagon they could lay their hands on. Mostly cattle wagons and open wooden planked vehicles. The regional controller was "pinching" locomotives from south Wales.

Other films show apples being shipped in open wagons too.

For those of us who model the 50s but are too young to have been there or remember it, these films are an eye opener for revealing just how much freight there was on the railway. There may be as many passenger journeys today as the late 50s / early 60s, but I bet the freight traffic is a fraction now of what it was then.

David
 
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