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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi there, im jamie im 20 years old and im new to the site. been a memeber for about a month but never posted.

anyway, i am in the process of building my model railway and really enjoying it. however i bought a stobart rail class 66, however its frustrating me becuase it keeps de-railing on corners over points and causes my layout to overload. grrrrrr. non of my other loco's have any issues touch wood.

the class 66 is a bachmann. does anyone know why it would be doing this? the track is fine i check out the areas where its de-railing. like i said other loco's are fine and run absolutely fine.

many thanks in advanced.

jamie
 

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Hi Jamie & welcome to the forum. Regarding your 66 problem it sounds very much like you have an out of gauge
axle(s). Considering everything else works ok the problem must be with the one loco. Have you a means of measuring the back to back width of the wheels and comparing with other rolling stock? Digital calipers are ideal but if you have a good eye then a steel rule may show a descrepency. It would be a very good idea to take it back to the retailer where you bought it and have it exchanged as opposed to repairing the fault yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
excellent, ill have a measure tomorrow. i'll keep u posted. is this a common problem or just bad luck?
 

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Is it common to have problems like this when making a model railway? Yes. As James May rightly said in the 'Top Toys' programme he made for the Beeb in 2005, 'you have to be a litttle bit of an engineer to make it (a train set) work'.

Is the 66 the longest loco you own? Are the points where it derails on the curved road Hornby or similar set track points? Does it derail on the curved route of every point, or only on some? Does it derail equally on left hand and right hand points? What do you actually see happening if you run the 66 slowly through the points on which derailments occur?

The reason for asking these questions is that the tightest curve the 66 is specified to go round is 2nd radius; and set track points are equivalent to 2nd radius on the curved route. As such your 66 may be 'on the edge' for trackholding on some points. It only needs something small to 'tip it over the edge' and cause a derailment. This could be a slight lack of bogie swing on the loco, or a slight bow in the trackbase of the points; or even a combination of both.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
its one of the longest i have a class 50 which is about the same length. that runs over all the points with no problems and the rest of the track. when running it slowly i see the very front wheels being pushed off the rails to the right leaving the middle wheels on the track and the wheels at the back of the front bogey off to the left. it does happen on every point. i now just leave the 66 in one of the sidings.
 

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Jamie,

Turn the 66 upside down, and try sighting along a steel straight edge on the 3 wheel treads each side of both bogies. If the centre wheelset of the bogie is standing high relative to the outer wheelsets, that's the problem cause. If you do find this problem, then return the 66 for replacement, as this is a basic fault that will always cause running problems.

If it is not that, then check that the bogies swing freely and can rock fore and aft a little. Put the loco on a 2nd radius curve, and check that the bogies are still 'loose'; that is they can still turn a little in the direction of a tighter curve, turn the loco round and repeat. If there is any suspicion of tightness, a small slackening of the bogie pivot screws may help, just half a turn anti clockwise. To get at these you have to take the body off, (see the assembly diagram) as the pivot screws are in the top of the chassis block.
 
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