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Wow..... that farm is absolutely superb, the attention to detail is overwhelming. I also liked the Belgian layout - some nice work there. And did I spot the Lilliput 05 in Olympic colours/markings but minus a certain symbol on the smokebox?

Thanks for posting the link.

Regards

John
 

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That Kurt und Susanne Nesselhauf exhibit is very impressive - little things like the lighter coloured slates on one roof to indicate those replaced. Excellent flora and fauna as well.

But that Modelspoorvereniging Post B (NL) - wowee!!! Vast shed and workshop; my favourite kind of layout


Regards,

Dan
 

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very impressive. structures. i do find the rolling stock on continental layouts a bit (how can i put this?) 'samey'? you see exactly the same loco's from the same manufacturers running on just about every layout.

If you ignored the stock and the track i would prefer a continental layout almost every time.

Peter
 

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There are some real artists out there. What a pleasure to view thier craftsmanship!


The farm scene by Kurt und Susanne Nesselhauf is something out of the top drawer. The attention to the finer detail is superb and once again illustrates the point that it is the finer detail that brings the model scene to life. I think Kurt and Susanne have achieved what they set out to do - to create a perfect little world in miniature.

It would be interesting to know what scale they used. It also appears as if most if not all structures were scratchbuilt as I can not identify any of the structures as being "off the shelf".

The other layouts are also impressive and should be an inspiration to all us "mad modellers".


Thank you for sharing it with us.


Kind regards.

Johan
 

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QUOTE (pedromorgan @ 24 Apr 2007, 05:58) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>i do find the rolling stock on continental layouts a bit (how can i put this?) 'samey'? you see exactly the same loco's from the same manufacturers running on just about every layout.
Peter

Unfortunately Peter the same can be said of an awful lot of British layouts as well.

Regards

John
 

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Wow! A German Pendon! That couple really know how to place buildings well in the landscape.

I loved the loco works, especially the staionary boiler - a feature not often seen on British models but a common enough feature at many termini....

60134
 

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QUOTE i do find the rolling stock on continental layouts a bit (how can i put this?) 'samey'? you see exactly the same loco's from the same manufacturers running on just about every layout.

I'm not really sure you can say that's just continental layouts. The same goes for British and dare I say many American which is why narrow gauge appeals to me. You can find some really wacky locomotives that are one offs for a particular lumber mill. This may be more the fault of the manufacturers than anything. The more unique models tend to have shorter runs by specialty companies like Micro-Metakit. Wouldn't I love to have a layout of locomotives nobody else had.
 

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QUOTE (Dennis David @ 24 Apr 2007, 14:42) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Wouldn't I love to have a layout of locomotives nobody else had.


I think it's fair to say we we all would, it's one of the reasons that a lot of my models get modified and weathered, it just makes them that little bit different.

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John
 

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QUOTE (Ravenser @ 24 Apr 2007, 17:24) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Mike Sharman's "Credibility Gap" (otherwise known as the mid Victorian engineering freak show) comes to mind
Sadly I missed ever seeing this, do you by any chance know when any long articles on it appeared in the model railway press?

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Dan
 

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QUOTE (Dennis David @ 24 Apr 2007, 14:42) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm not really sure you can say that's just continental layouts. The same goes for British and dare I say many American which is why narrow gauge appeals to me. You can find some really wacky locomotives that are one offs for a particular lumber mill. This may be more the fault of the manufacturers than anything. The more unique models tend to have shorter runs by specialty companies like Micro-Metakit. Wouldn't I love to have a layout of locomotives nobody else had.
 

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QUOTE (Dennis David @ 24 Apr 2007, 14:42) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm not really sure you can say that's just continental layouts. The same goes for British and dare I say many American which is why narrow gauge appeals to me. You can find some really wacky locomotives that are one offs for a particular lumber mill. This may be more the fault of the manufacturers than anything. The more unique models tend to have shorter runs by specialty companies like Micro-Metakit. Wouldn't I love to have a layout of locomotives nobody else had.


Whenever I buy a new loco for my German layout, there are cries of "not another black loco with red wheels!" Now with 140 locos, about half fit that description, but they are all different. There are so many varieties available off the shelf, and also by the use of detailing parts from companies such as Weinert different locos can be produced.

However I do look enviously at Micro-metakit and some of the really super models they produce of exotic prototypes. The temptation is great but the price is really scarey!
 

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QUOTE (custodian @ 25 Apr 2007, 00:44) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>However I do look enviously at Micro-metakit and some of the really super models they produce of exotic prototypes. The temptation is great but the price is really scarey!

So do I - & am in the fortunate position to buy them at trade price !

What's the matter with red & black anyway ? - you could say "not another green loco with black wheels" about a certain UK railway company !
 

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QUOTE (Dennis David)I'm not really sure you can say that's just continental layouts. The same goes for British and dare I say many American which is why narrow gauge appeals to me. You can find some really wacky locomotives that are one offs for a particular lumber mill. This may be more the fault of the manufacturers than anything. The more unique models tend to have shorter runs by specialty companies like Micro-Metakit. Wouldn't I love to have a layout of locomotives nobody else had.


I agree it does happen on uk layouts too bu i dont think to the same extent. i put it down to UK models in the recent past being significantly poorer than our contintntal counterparts that there is far more of a culture of modifying or kit building than their is on the continent.
Dare i say it that recent UK modern image layouts are some of the worst offenders. but its certainatly not unusual to see a layout where all the stock has been scratch or kit built or at least significantly modified. i dont think that is the case with the continental layouts.
I wonder if it is the sheer price of continental models that puts people off butchering them. or mabye there was less variety on the prototype?

I am a great fan of mike sharmans weird and wonderfull loco's. i love the way they try and solve victorian problems that unknown to the engineers never actually existed! i remember him building one that had an oscilating centre axle! they thought wheel balencing couldnt be done at high speed so they built a loco with wheels at 180 degrees and used a heath robinson mechanism to make it work! wonderfull model.

Peter
 

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QUOTE I wonder if it is the sheer price of continental models that puts people off butchering them.

Pete, some good points and coming from you I can understand that seeing the work you do.
As far as butchering locomotives I think it's the same issue when you see most continental layouts don't have a lot of weathering of buildings or trains and when do you see rusting junk. It's just the way they like to see things.
 

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There's also the simple fact that Britain's railways were much more fragmented. Most Continental countries had either a single state administration, or a small number of large companies (eg 6 in France). Nationalisation/standardisation came much earlier in Germany and France. Prior to 1923 Britain had well over 20 main line railways operating their own systems (plus various minor railways) . Then they were amalgamated into 4 which produced a whole new range of designs , then they were nationalised, resulting in a new set of "Standard" designs...

Britains railways had many hundreds of different types of loco in the 50s. The LNER - just one of the 4 Groups - gave each class a designation based on letter (for wheel arrangement) and number. The J list alone (0-6-0, 0-6-0T) got to J94

If you want a RTR LNER 0-6-0 - the Southern Area alone has 3 leading candidates (J11, J15, J6) never mind all the lesser types. That's leaving out the NE Area and Scottish Area, which are separate debates....

Never in a month of Sundays can the RTR manufacturers cover more than a fraction of this. Hence kits are essential to fill in the gaps where sales volumes would be modest - to be truly representive/authentic you need the variety ....
 
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