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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

Following on from the discussion on PIKO track, what commercial HO set track system is best for the somebody starting out.

Thanks
 

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If you want HO setrack then Fleischmann Profi takes a lot of beating, robust, reliable, good range, relatively easy to buy, virtually anything will run on it & point motors than only require half an amp to operate motors being some of the advantages - BTW - it's code 100.

Only real disadvantage is cost.

The Roco set track systems - Geoline with road bed & Rocoline without roadbed are also worth a look, both having a good range of sections.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 15 Oct 2007, 19:48) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>If you want HO setrack then Fleischmann Profi takes a lot of beating, robust, reliable, good range, relatively easy to buy, virtually anything will run on it & point motors than only require half an amp to operate motors being some of the advantages - BTW - it's code 100.

Only real disadvantage is cost.

The Roco set track systems - Geoline with road bed & Rocoline without roadbed are also worth a look, both having a good range of sections.

Thanks for that, I will check out both.
 

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I think it is worth pointing out that RocoLine has a range of curves which goes beyond the small train set size. R4 (481.2mm), R5 (542.8mm), R6 (604.4mm), R9 (826.4mm). If that's not enough the R10 (888mm) and R20 (1962mm) curves intended to complement the wide radius points might also be pressed into service.

I don't know if Fleischmann or Trix go that far out.

David
 

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Hi S&D,

Track Geometry, is in my opinion, the most critical issue that you should consider when starting out.

OK, straights are straights and curves are curves in nearly all makes. It comes down to the geometry of the points which determine your track laying at the end of the day.

Now I can hear modellers saying use flexi track where appropriate. Not everybody has the luxury of a wide , spacious layout space where you can use large radius express points and large radius curves.

If you have limited space available for your layout, you will want to utilize every single cm square of it and this is achieved by chosing the right track along with points which will suit your need.

I have seen in a German Magazine a comparision of different makes of tracks, a curved mainline coming into a station branching into four straight station tracks by means of double slips and left/right points.

The best make which achived this on a short curved distance was Maerklin track, then came ROCO and Fleischmann.

If you have enough space than none of the above really matters.

cheers

Baykal
 

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A word of caution. Rocoline and others use too large a gap twixt crossing nose resulting in 'better' wheels dropping into the gap with a nasty lurch. This will be very noticeable when using recent Brawa and Roco releases especially the top-quality locos such as the BR03.10, BR18.4 and OBB 310.

I don't think that Maerklin can be compared as it not so much an alternative as it is a system, after all if you buy Maerklin you are pretty much tied into their track whilst two-railers can pick and choose to whatever product suits pocket and track standard.

Trixs new range of track may suffer from the same issue that beset the Maerklin track (from which is supposed to be developed) in that the switch rails foul certain wheel profiles. There was a considerable kerfuffle on the Maeklin-user forums when the track was introduced and forced Maerklin to recall consderable amounts of their products.

By all means, use whatever suits the pocket but remember that any ambitions for better appearance and running will require some hard choices in the future.
 

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QUOTE (72C @ 16 Oct 2007, 11:40) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>A word of caution. Rocoline and others use too large a gap twixt crossing nose resulting in 'better' wheels dropping into the gap with a nasty lurch.

Having said that, the FLM Profi express points use a movable frog so that is not an issue !

As usual for MRF a simple question ends up with lots of answers !
 

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QUOTE Having said that, the FLM Profi express points use a movable frog so that is not an issue !

Therefore your comment only applies to GFN Profi turnouts and no others?

However, the important dimension is the crossing gap and whether it is moving or not, it will cause stock to lurch, if it is excessive.
 

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QUOTE (72C @ 16 Oct 2007, 13:01) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Therefore your comment only applies to GFN Profi turnouts and no others?

However, the important dimension is the crossing gap and whether it is moving or not, it will cause stock to lurch, if it is excessive.

Correct - (although I am assuming "GFN" is a typo) & the movable frog is only a feature of the express points.

If you look at the FLM express points you will see that there is no gap, due to the moveable section of the point.

Also, in our experience FLM Profi track is far more "universal" than another well known make that used to call it's track "universal".

It's beginning to get to the situation that you either have to compromise & accept the odd "lurching" with finer scale flanges using "universal" track or use a much finer track & change all the wheels.
 

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Having as I do an assortment of track I personally (modellers hat on) much prefer the inherent strength of the Fleischmann Profi and Roco Geoline. Both have built in road beds which make them more train set friendly and additionally you don't need to painstakingly ballast the whole lot.

Regards
 

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QUOTE although I am assuming "GFN" is a typo

Gebrüder Fleischmann Nürnberg

GFN is the companies initials as used by Fleischmann, they never use FLM as an abbreviation and it is part of their logo.

Did you not know that?

QUOTE It's beginning to get to the situation that you either have to compromise & accept the odd "lurching" with finer scale flanges using "universal" track or use a much finer track & change all the wheels.

Life is full of compromises, the track does have to be 'much' finer, just be careful when selecting the product. If the modeller is hoping to build for the long term, then some foresight is needed?

However the point that I am attempting to make is that choice of track is not that easy.
 

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QUOTE (72C @ 16 Oct 2007, 18:12) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Gebrüder Fleischmann Nürnberg

GFN is the companies initials as used by Fleischmann, they never use FLM as an abbreviation and it is part of their logo.

Did you not know that?

Yes I was, although I had forgotton as it's very rarely used in the UK whereas FLM is a common abbreviation on forums & Fleischmann themselves abbreviate the "Gebrüder" to "GEBR".
 

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In a word, no.

Which is why those who do use Tillig often modify the turnouts (especially the tiebar)

Strangely, Peco turnouts look more like older German turnouts than you might think.



The Peco timbering can be modified to suit German pattern and the tiebar hidden by the crossing cover (the sheetmetal ramp) but what is interesting are the hinged switch rails. The photo was taken by a friend at Bayreuth in the 60's. Weinert weichenlanterne would complete the image.

Try this webpage for more information:

Track
 

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QUOTE Rocoline and others use too large a gap twixt crossing nose resulting in 'better' wheels dropping into the gap with a nasty lurch.

When I was checking the new Roco catalogue yesterday for radius information, I noticed part numbers 98019, 98020. I will let the catalogue explain:-

QUOTE RP-25 inserts for ROCO LINE tracks
While most NEM wheels boast a flange height of approx 1mm, RP-25 wheels have a flange height of only 0.64mm. When models with RP-25 wheel sets run over the frogs if standard turnouts, this difference in height is noticeable because they bump along. The inserts made of etched sheet brass enable vehicles with RP-25 wheels to run smoothly.

Would these things solve the problem? Of course you have to be running the same wheel profile on all your stock; but you do do that don't you?


David
 
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