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Hornby's limited edition of 'Bude' West Country loco with Stanier Tender (R2685) appears to be quite heavily discounted by some major retailers, possibly indicating poor sales. Aesthetically it leaves something to be desired, and it can only be used on certain layouts if you care about prototypical running.

But it got me wondering; what other unusual couplings were there in these locomotive trials, and how far did they work oustide their region? Were Bulleids ever seen north of Glasgow or Edinburgh? Did Gresley pacifics ever work west? Did any look better or worse than the Bulleid/Stanier combo (course, it may just be the dull black tender which looks so drab next to the green spamcan)? Should Hornby continue with this idea?

mal
 

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Not suprised it isn't selling - its a Frankenstein creation! Just doesn't look right. Unless you're a real entusiast you'd avoid this one like the plague. Although WC enthusiasts have explained that by dubstituting the tender you can have quite a good model .

Weren't WCs tried on the Highland Mainline after nationalisation to see how a pacific would cope?

Russell
 

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This tender was joined to the poor West Country during the 1948 Locomotive Trials when loco`s from all regions were tested on the other regions lines. This was because the Southern had no water troughs over the length of its metals and a tender with a water scoop would be essential for any trips over 130 miles of so. Kings over Shap, Duchesses over Dainton etc. as well as Halls, B1`s, Black 5`s all tried on secondary routes as well as the main line traffic.
For a full review look it on the net. There is bound to be reports somewhere, or perhaps someone can suggest a decent reference book.
There is some mention of it in `British Locomotives of th 20th Century` by O.S.Nock.
 

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On the book front you could try and source a copy of "The 1948 locomotive exchanges" although I can't remember if it was written by O. S. Nock or C.J. Allen!

On the subject of tenders I think it was the Duchesses that got stuck with the WD tenders.

Finally it is planned to send a Bulleid to their old Scottish stamping ground this year, the intended locomotive being 34070 Manston.

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QUOTE (rb277170 @ 26 May 2008, 02:47) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Not suprised it isn't selling - its a Frankenstein creation! Just doesn't look right. <Snip>
Russell

***True - what a waste of a perfectly good Stanier tender!!!


More seriously (I was only joking, really! ...well... ummm.... sort of anyway) surely it'd have been far more sensible for Hornby to simply make tenders available separately.

Tenders changed between loco's and loco classes often especially within each region so the option of spare tenders to make up new loco/tender comdinations would sit well with many modellers I'd have thought... and doing so would only be a matter of ordering a few more with each loco batch and creating a new box.

Richard
 

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Found it! I knew I had a photo somewhere of a Duchess (sorry, Princess Coronation...) with a WD tender. No. 46236 ran trials on the Southern Region with one, again to increase water capacity - cheekily the tender had "LMS" painted on it, even though City of Bradford was already carrying its BR number.

60134
 

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I have to agree Brian

Mind you it is historically accurate, and to be fair the Duchess with the WD tender looked even worse! Yes 60134 I found a photo in the book as mentioned earlier - still forgot to remember the author! (?)

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One of the other interesting things about the Bude model is the lengthened smoke deflectors on the casing. So far unique to this model in the Hornby range. I think thats why some people are buying it then obtaining a proper tender from one od the spares stockists.

Bizarre. You do wonder sometimes who thinks them up at Hornby

Russell
 

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QUOTE (rb277170 @ 25 May 2008, 19:47) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Weren't WCs tried on the Highland Mainline after nationalisation to see how a pacific would cope?

Some were sent to Norwich to see how they coped on the East Anglian expresses, they soon returned home though.

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The Bulleids coped extremely well with whatever tasks were set for them. They were free-steaming and powerful. What let them down was their coal and oil consumption, although, to be fair, they didn't need the really good quality coal that most of the other railways' locomotives on trial needed - the Bulleids would burn just about anything that was fed to them. During the post-war period that was a distinct advantage.
 

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There is no doubt that the Bulleid boiler was a good design, have any other UK locos employed thermic syphons in the firebox?

60134
 

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QUOTE (60134 @ 29 May 2008, 10:53) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>There is no doubt that the Bulleid boiler was a good design, have any other UK locos employed thermic syphons in the firebox?

I'm not aware that any other UK designs ever used the thermic syphons, but would add that in my opinion the re-built pacifics were one of the best looking steam locos ever to run in the UK. They also had the advantage of lots of electric lighting - very handy in gloomy sheds.

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QUOTE (BRITHO @ 27 May 2008, 12:37) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>On the book front you could try and source a copy of "The 1948 locomotive exchanges" although I can't remember if it was written by O. S. Nock or C.J. Allen!

It's C. J. Allen, my copy was published in 1950.

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mmm interesting thread,

However, all regional emotion apart, if you look at the written summaries of the Locomotive Exchanges, there's a lot of tosh to get through, tables, data, coal consumption etc. The Railway Magazine report of the Exchanges singled out 2 Bullied engines for special mention, albeit on individual runs rather than statistical analysis over the whole period. One famous one was Belgian Marine starting out of Penrith after a signal stop, heading South over Shap, the other was a WC (probably Bude), Northbound, Perth to Inverness. This latest one even remarking that the banking engine employed on one stretch could not keep up with the train, which accelerated away from it throughout the climb!!!!

Cheers

6991
 

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QUOTE (6991 @ 12 Jun 2008, 11:38) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>mmm interesting thread,

However, all regional emotion apart, if you look at the written summaries of the Locomotive Exchanges, there's a lot of tosh to get through, tables, data, coal consumption etc. The Railway Magazine report of the Exchanges singled out 2 Bullied engines for special mention, albeit on individual runs rather than statistical analysis over the whole period. One famous one was Belgian Marine starting out of Penrith after a signal stop, heading South over Shap, the other was a WC (probably Bude), Northbound, Perth to Inverness. This latest one even remarking that the banking engine employed on one stretch could not keep up with the train, which accelerated away from it throughout the climb!!!!

Cheers

6991
 

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There were three Merchant Navies and Three West Countries involved in the 1948 exchanges

They were 35017 Belgian Marine, 35019 French Line C.G.T., and 35020 Bibby Line
34004 Yeovil, 34005 Barnstaple and 34006 Bude.

The WCs all had long smoke deflectors as portrayed in the Hornby Model.

Yeovil performed outstandingly on the Highland Main line and winded the Caley Bogie Banker on Struan Bank!

The reason for the LMS tenders was the fact that the SR tenders had no water pickup apparatus. They were borrowed from 8Fs which had WD tenders for the duration.

City of Bradford and The Hussar ran with WD tenders on the Southern.

The model is ugly but prototypical. A pity Hornby didn't supply with both tenders - I'm sure it would have sold better.
Spare Hornby 4000 gallon tenders are easy to obtain but spare WD tenders are not. I'ts a pity that Bachmann don't supply spare tenders for UK based models like they do for the US ones.
 

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QUOTE (Saint Johnstoun @ 22 Jun 2008, 19:49) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>There were three Merchant Navies and Three West Countries involved in the 1948 exchanges

They were 35017 Belgian Marine, 35019 French Line C.G.T., and 35020 Bibby Line
34004 Yeovil, 34005 Barnstaple and 34006 Bude.

The WCs all had long smoke deflectors as portrayed in the Hornby Model.

Yeovil performed outstandingly on the Highland Main line and winded the Caley Bogie Banker on Struan Bank!

The reason for the LMS tenders was the fact that the SR tenders had no water pickup apparatus. They were borrowed from 8Fs which had WD tenders for the duration.

City of Bradford and The Hussar ran with WD tenders on the Southern.

The model is ugly but prototypical. A pity Hornby didn't supply with both tenders - I'm sure it would have sold better.
Spare Hornby 4000 gallon tenders are easy to obtain but spare WD tenders are not. I'ts a pity that Bachmann don't supply spare tenders for UK based models like they do for the US ones.
 
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