Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
This clip has R8210 on the bottom and is soldered to the track. There is no visible suppression unless it is in the clip box which cannot be opened. The set locomotives each have suppresion.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
QUOTE It sounds like this is a development of the R8206 track - this has a suppressor capacitor across the track in between the rails covered by a little plastic cover moulded to look a bit like a short wooden walkway.

It has the moulded walkway but no suppression under.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
QUOTE the point which comes with the set is not an electrofrog point

Good point. Electrofrog points work differently to the non isolating points in that current must always be fed to the toe end of the point. This is not the case with the Hornby non isolating point and power can come from any direction. This is how Hornby manage to electrify a whole layout from one power terminal and for the beginner seems to simplify things considerably!

Happy modelling
Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
QUOTE Indeed! I spent several minutes wondering whether there were crossover configurations where a non-isolating point could produce a short but didn't think of any.

Thats nice to know. I wonder how long Hornby spent doing this?

It does seem like somebody in the white coated "Q Branch" boffin room at Hornby had a moment of genius with this idea.

The clips are available as an accessory R8232 Hornby DCC Electric Point Clips in packs of 20 for about £2.50 and can be inserted in to any Hornby point. I have a sneeky feeling they will also fit Peco points aswell. They are to convert Hornby points for use with Hornby DCC.

It solves the age old issue of requiring two seperate isolated controllers to control the inner and outer tracks on an oval that are linked with a pair of standard Hornby insulating points. This for me is a massive Hornby Digital selling point and I am suprised Hornby don't make more of this.

For the Hornby customer new to DCC it does seem to make putting Hornby DCC layouts together so simple so well done Hornby!


Happy modelling
Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
QUOTE What was the DC problem?

The DC issue is that you need a seperate power clip per oval so those using R1, R2 and R3 ovals would need 3 power clips with each clip linked to its own controller. If you set both DC controllers live when switching a train over from R2 to R3 then you get a short circuit.

Those using the Hornby Digital system with the non isolating points no longer have to worry about any of this.

Techies should remember that Hornby users like things to be very simple and they are extremely unlikely to install a seperate wired bus. This solution literally means that only one power connection is required across the entire layout even on those sections such as reverse sidings. This is a big big selling point!

Its a fantastic solution to an age old DC wiring and control arrangement.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
Looking at that layout design you have a figure of 8 situation on the inside radius circuit.

That is a layout design which would require some form of isolation between the outer and inner radius IF you connect both parts of the figure of 8 to the outside radius on the same side.

And you would need to incorporate a reverse loop module it seems to prevent a short circuit.

Figure of 8 layouts are shown in the Hornby Track Plan book.

It will be VERY interesting to see what plans are in the next Hornby Track Plan book which promises to embrace digital layout design.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
I am going to have a play and make some weird and wonderful shunting track formations that I have never made before because of the DC complications. Lets see how I get on. Pictures here later.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
This should make it clear what is possible.

This was set up with 3 non isolating points. I had to manufacture some Hornby DCC point clips. All points are Hornby. Both trains had independent control across the entire track from the one power connection on the "wrong side" of the point from a DC perspective. Never before have I had this type of experience without complex DC wiring and switching arrangements:-



It definitely takes railway modelling and track planning to an entirely new level!

Happy modelling
Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
Look closely at the position setting of the non isolating point spades in the picture above.

If these points were standard insulating or electrofrog then you would not be able to control the loco in the top left corner under DCC without some additional wiring.

Non isolating points enable this control to happen and with no extra wiring.

Happy modelling
Gary

PS why does every garden layout make me feel like taking up gardening!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
Isn't this though one of the big issues with DCC in the UK?


It hasn't been explained at all well over the last 10 years. Visit any digital exhibition stand and start speaking to the sale reps....

.....and then start scratching your head!

Why can't they simply show people with well prepared images what is possible without any wiring?


The average UK modeller is not keen on wiring and avoids it. It is a massive step to electrify a point for most UK modellers.

DCC has been an exclusive club for a few as a result. OK wiring will bring additional benefits but why introduce it right at the start?


A single image like the one below which shows just one controller connection (same as DC) and thats it should do a lot more to encourage the masses to think about DCC than 1000 words contained within a tech heavy document or words from a jargon heavy commentator or sales rep.



Let us not forget who Hornby are aiming their digital systems at.

People like me who like it simple!


Happy modelling
Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
QUOTE whereas many layouts at exhibitions appear to have at least one member with a "wiring fetish" judging by some of the monstrous panels mounted at the rear of the layout.

When you are a member of a club you see it from the club/exhibitor perspective. Warley MRC have a wiring team that turn up every friday night (YES FRIDAY NIGHT!) and do nothing but baseboard wiring! If they can think of something to wire then they do it! If I meet any of you at the Warley Show we can talk further about this. I don't know what I am on the rota to do yet however they know I am a customer facing sort of person and not one to hide behind the barriers controlling the layout so I might be collecting your tickets at the door or encouraging you to buy a programme!


We digress from the almost wire free Hornby Digital!

Happy modelling
Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
The Select manual states that when pressing the "Stop" button all activity on the layout will cease.

You then turn the control knob fully anticlockwise to zero.

The manual then states that you press "Stop" again to QUOTE restore power to the layout All locomotives remain stationary when this happens. To recommence movement you select each loco individually to control.

I would agree that there is a very small almost imperceptable buzz from the locos when the "Stop" button is pressed.

Maybe some clarification is required from Hornby.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,650 Posts
Just to confirm that I have been running the two Hornby Digital Mixed Goods Train Set locomotives using my Hammant & Morgan Duette analogue controller tonight and they both run fine with the Hornby Digital decoder fitted.

When applying instant full power there was a brief lag before the loco shot forwards or backwards. Same with non Hornby decoders fitted to other locos so this appears to be a normal response. This lag may be a safeguard to protect the decoder from this sudden surge when applying instant full power.

Happy modelling
Gary
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top