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Chief mouser
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I seem to recall that someone, a few years ago, produced a conversion kit to make a Crosti 9F using the original Hornby model, I don't know if it's still available though.

Mind you in my opinion the Crosti boilered 9F was possibly the ugliest loco ever to run in the UK!

Regards
 

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Looks like the drive train is better hidden than the Bachmann version. How long until we get a proper body to go on it.
I need to replace my last generation Hornby Evening Star as it looks a bit cr*p next to Britannia and I missed out on the Bachmann one.

Andii
 

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QUOTE (BRITHO @ 25 Sep 2008, 13:44) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I seem to recall that someone, a few years ago, produced a conversion kit to make a Crosti 9F using the original Hornby model, I don't know if it's still available though.

Mind you in my opinion the Crosti boilered 9F was possibly the ugliest loco ever to run in the UK!

Regards

Hi Dave
There's a guy who sell a kit on ebay
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/CROSTIE-9F-CONVERSIO...id=p3286.c0.m14

Regards Andii
 

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In depth idiot
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Surely that is dependent on the price relative to a Bachmann 9F? The Hornby will have a significantly less detailed loco chassis, double chimney, wrong tender type for a Crosti, and an inaccurate tender chassis (over length drag box). If any of those would be on the 'to do' list then careful pricing of the parts required against the price difference to purchase a Bachmann single chimney BR1C tender combination would be sensible. Having once laboured over a kit 9F, I'd pay the £40 difference just for the chassis detail on the Bachmann...
 

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That is the odd thing about the Railroad version of the Flying Scotsman, it's loco drive but has the Ringfield tender chassis sans armature and gears - most odd! The tender weighs a ton in consequence!


60134
 

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QUOTE (60134 @ 25 Sep 2008, 18:47) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>That is the odd thing about the Railroad version of the Flying Scotsman, it's loco drive but has the Ringfield tender chassis sans armature and gears - most odd! The tender weighs a ton in consequence!
No redesign cost, and 'a part is a part' to a large extent when it comes to the cost of making and assembling the model. I noticed when looking at the service sheet for the 9F that an apparently superfluous motor part was installed in the tender: but it is required to locate the stub axle for the centre wheel one side. On your Railroad FS are there traction tyres on the tender, as on the diagram? If they are fitted, best to remove them as they are draggy. Of course if someone in the assembly ops has their brain in gear, they may have been able to alter the kitting so that the assembly line just gets plain metal tyred wheels for the tender.
 

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It's just a bit odd given that fact that they have driveless tenders attached to the A4s and A3s currently in production - all with plastic chassis.

60134
 

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QUOTE (60134 @ 25 Sep 2008, 20:52) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>It's just a bit odd given that fact that they have driveless tenders attached to the A4s and A3s currently in production - all with plastic chassis.
It may seem odd, but I should think the situation is that the lower cost of the Railroad product is obtained in part by the tools being fully amortised, so there is no tooling cost assigned to the unit manufacturing cost. Hornby can therefore make a 'Railroad' product cheaply until the tools clap out; and are not undermining the perceived value of their recently tooled more accurate premium product, which has to be sold at a higher price to recover the tooling investment.
 

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I would expect that there are fewer parts in a RailRoad tender so the assembly costs would be lower too.

David
 

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I tarted up an old Evening Star with wire handrails etc and then went on to convert another tender drive Hornby 9F to a Crosti using the old Crownline Kit. I still have these but as I don't like tender drives they are in storage.

I've just bought a Crosti conversion kit and will use it on a suitable Bachmann 9F once I have located a S/h one at the right price.

As far as the Hornby Railroad job is concerned - ideal for the trainset market for which it is intended of course, but let's be honest - unless you want to spend a lot of time and effort not a good starting point for an improved model.
 
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