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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I have a new set of plans for my model railway. After seeing a photo on this page (click), (Pic 2 and 3).

What sort of wood would I use for this sort of incline and curve? If it was a stright incline it shouldnt be much of a problem, but as it is curved I wouldn't know what to use. I am assuming it is 2nd and 3rd Radious to ensure the track stays the same shape as a pose to using flexi track?

Any suggestions would gratefully be appreciated.

Cheers
 

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Hi Breaston he used MDF not sure what thickness it is but you can use MDF or PLYWOOD either will do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info. Was in B&Q eariler today as I went to buy some more loft panels, I got £2.50 off - WOW. better than nothing I suppose. Anyway I had a look at some wood there and I dont recall what it was, it felt like MDF but I dont think it was, it bent quite well, a bit of pressure needed but it could hold a tub of 1ltr PVA glue so I suppose it could be useable, diddnt buy any as I diddnt want to buy everything at once as I would have no room to store it.

Many thanks again
KB
 

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Hi

You can actually buy ready made helixs from White Rose Model Works, tel. no. 01677 422444. A member of our local club has one and is pleased with it.
 

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QUOTE (Breaston @ 2 Feb 2008, 16:03) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Thanks for the info. Was in B&Q eariler today as I went to buy some more loft panels, I got £2.50 off - WOW. better than nothing I suppose. Anyway I had a look at some wood there and I dont recall what it was, it felt like MDF but I dont think it was, it bent quite well, a bit of pressure needed but it could hold a tub of 1ltr PVA glue so I suppose it could be useable, diddnt buy any as I diddnt want to buy everything at once as I would have no room to store it.

Many thanks again
KB

Hi Breaston,

Strictly speaking curves on inclines should be super-elevated i.e. slightly banked, which helps to direct the alignment of the pulling force along the train thus reducing resistance.

I build my inclines using 6mm plywood set on 12mm plywood risers spaced at 250 mm centres. Remember also that you need to have a vertical transition curve before you actually go into the main gradient. If, for example you are planning to rise 75mm (3" in old money) at a maximum gradient of 1 in 50 you would need 3.75 metres in which to do it, which would give you a rise of 5mm between each riser. However, in practice you should only rise half of this over the first 250mm and again ease out the gradient in the same manner at the top of the incline. this would therefore increase the overall length of the incline by 250mm to 4.00 metres.

I hope the above is clear but if not please come back to me.

Regards,

Expat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (Diggy @ 2 Feb 2008, 14:17) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi

You can actually buy ready made helixs from White Rose Model Works, tel. no. 01677 422444. A member of our local club has one and is pleased with it.

Do you know how much roughly ready made ones are? Cheers for that

---------------------------------

QUOTE (Expat @ 2 Feb 2008, 15:06) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi Breaston,

Strictly speaking curves on inclines should be super-elevated i.e. slightly banked, which helps to direct the alignment of the pulling force along the train thus reducing resistance.

I build my inclines using 6mm plywood set on 12mm plywood risers spaced at 250 mm centres. Remember also that you need to have a vertical transition curve before you actually go into the main gradient. If, for example you are planning to rise 75mm (3" in old money) at a maximum gradient of 1 in 50 you would need 3.75 metres in which to do it, which would give you a rise of 5mm between each riser. However, in practice you should only rise half of this over the first 250mm and again ease out the gradient in the same manner at the top of the incline. this would therefore increase the overall length of the incline by 250mm to 4.00 metres.

I hope the above is clear but if not please come back to me.

Regards,

Expat.

think I understand what you mean, so flat main baseboard to flat start of incline then start to incline? I only intwnd it to be about 3 inches above main baseboard, basically the same as that of the photo in the link.

Cheers
 

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QUOTE (Breaston @ 2 Feb 2008, 22:47) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Do you know how much roughly ready made ones are? Cheers for that

I think that they were reasonably priced from what he said, give them a ring and see what they say
 
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