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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I have decided to plan my layout (Chances are someting will go wrong with plans).

My room is really small. The only way I can possibly have a layout is to make it fold up after use


(Not to scale)

I have decided to have a Length of 53.5" That just about reaches my door, and has enough room for a 3rd Radius curve (Hornby)


(Not to scale)

The brown area is the baseboard. The fiddle yard to the right of my Room is permanent, This is so that I don't have to take my locos off after I have finished using my layout, also it allows for a quick and efficient change between locos.


(Not to scale)
(Note: spelling of permanent
)

This diagram shows how the Layout folds down.



I have also decided to have an isolating section Just before the join between the Folding layout and fiddle yard. This is because both will operate on different controllers (To allow shunting and another Loco running around the loop).

If anyone has any tips or anything they want to share, Please do!


- Jeorge
 

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That looks like a good idea with the space you have there. The woodwork aspect of it is probably what you want to get right before going any further. These raising and lowering counter style layouts can be trickier than they appear on paper. The key to smooth operation of raising and lowering is to have perfect right angles on the cross cuts. This will enable a snug fit when you lower the raised part.

Also make sure the hinges are securely fastened with no wiggle room as the drawbridge part needs to come down in exactly the same position each time if the tracks are to line up. Maybe have guides at each side to ensure the position is constant.

Good luck.
 

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Nice plan you've designed
On hinging of the counter or drawbridge section and to allow constant alignment don't use ordinary hinges use a continuous hinge often called a 'Piano hinge' which can be purchased in various lengths and cut shorter to exact length with a hacksaw.


Now, how about the track plan for debate?
 

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That looks like a good plan and nice use of space! As has been said, the alignment issue wiil make or break it!
 

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As an alternative to a folding layout, you could investigate the company that provides the equipment to raise and lower your layout with a pulley system. ( At least this would do away with the tricky marrying of the folding parts that Neil points out need to be spot on ) I've noticed them advertising in Railway Modeller a few times over the last couple of months. No doubt one of our members, with a better memory than me, will remember their name and post up the information. If not I'll dig out my back copies and find the info for you. All the best
 

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QUOTE (Gwent rail @ 11 Jul 2006, 19:13) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>As an alternative to a folding layout, you could investigate the company that provides the equipment to raise and lower your layout with a pulley system. ( At least this would do away with the tricky marrying of the folding parts that Neil points out need to be spot on ) I've noticed them advertising in Railway Modeller a few times over the last couple of months. No doubt one of our members, with a better memory than me, will remember their name and post up the information. If not I'll dig out my back copies and find the info for you. All the best

I would at least have a think about this idea as an option as it does have some benefits. I am in the process of planning a layout in my garage and one part of my layout may need a raising and lowering part like you have in your plan. I am looking into all options to avoid doing this for the reasons mentioned above as I will have between four and eight tracks crossing at this point.
 

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Hoisting a layout up to the ceiling is a good way of returning the room (or area occupied) back to normal when were not 'playing trains'. It's especially useful in a garage where the car can be garaged normally with the railway out of use above it.
Down sides are:- In a normal room with a ceiling between 7'6" and 8' foot high it will have to be some 6 to 10 inches off the ceiling (due to the scenic's and pulleys for the raising and lowering etc) so head height in the room will be reduced. All stock will have to be removed before raising it and layouts aren't particularly attractive on their underside which will be seen when in the raised position.
 

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YAY!

My Fowler 4P came, And the quality of it is Amazing, almost equal to that of my fathers Models.

I'm Now saving up for An AIX Terrier or a Q1.

_____________

The chances of my having a folding layout seems very Slim. Our walls are plasterboard and my dad nor I are Carpenters.

My Dad has suggested a Flat board that slides down the side of my bed when finished, I Guess that means No Hills. But im fine with that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My dad said He will get to building my layout soon, But first I shall tell you all the story of an Engine...

My Fowler broke, I was putting the front coupling in, there were no Instructions on how to do this, so I proceeded to unscrew the bottom of the chassis. I took just enough screws out to remove the front pony. SPROING! out flew the contacts. My dad said he will solder them back in since i have tryed so many times to put them back. This upset me so my dad said I could have the Terrier
. Today i had to bring it back to the dealer because it waddled like a Duck (I did make sure it was a Terrier not a Pannier tank
) Anyway The guy said there would be no piont in getting another because it would do just the same
Bye bye Piccadilly. My dad saw the Q1 on the shelf and he gave me the difference. I am happy but i loved my Terrier
Thats the 5th of 5 locos i have had that has either Broke or been returned


What luck i've had


My dad told me I could have a layout because he and I are not happy about an 80 quid loco trundling around the floor...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Does anyone have any ideas on how to fix something heavy to a Plasterboard wall?
 

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QUOTE (Jeorge @ 18 Aug 2006, 20:21) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Does anyone have any ideas on how to fix something heavy to a Plasterboard wall?

My boards go round the sides of my spare room and are attached using 1"x2" timber battons secured to the plasterboard using Self Drilling, One Piece Metal Anchors...they are just great...you could hang an elephant on them (well, perhaps thats a little exagerated). There is a metal, wide threaded section that you screw directly into the plasterboard. This lays flush with the surface of the wall. In the centre of it there is a metal threaded hole, which you can screw directly into...its really strong.




Give them a try; I use them as well to hang my Hi-Fi Speakers, and they weigh a bit!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks!
 

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The plasterboard should be fixed at regular intervals to vertical wood 'studding' which forms the main structural elements of the wall. If you can locate the studding either by detecting where the plasterboard is nailed to them or with a stud detector (often doubles up as a cable detector) you can fit brackets or other supports with ordinary wood screws through the plasterboard into the studding. There is less risk of damaging the plasterboard and no doubt about the carrying capacity.
Regards,
John Webb
 

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QUOTE (John Webb @ 19 Aug 2006, 19:12) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The plasterboard should be fixed at regular intervals to vertical wood 'studding' which forms the main structural elements of the wall. If you can locate the studding either by detecting where the plasterboard is nailed to them or with a stud detector (often doubles up as a cable detector) you can fit brackets or other supports with ordinary wood screws through the plasterboard into the studding. There is less risk of damaging the plasterboard and no doubt about the carrying capacity.
Regards,
John Webb

I have to use this method to hang shelves in my house in Melbourne as it has pretty flimsy plasterboard walls. I use a stud finder to find where the wooden struts are. Be careful of the stud finder you use as I had a crap one which give wrong information and I put in screws and stuff where there were none and pictures came out with a substantial chunk of plaster. I found Stanley studfinders to be good.
 

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*Grunts* My dad keeps changing his idea, he now says the walls are Ceiling board! I've even suggested that I have my matress on the floor and have my baseboard above me, If I cant have an oval I can modell our old Local station Which shouldnt take up too much space..

EDIT:

QUOTE (Dennis David @ 19 Aug 2006, 16:52) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>How about building something like a Murphey Bed? These are often not attached but free standing and just placed against a wall.

Hmm, Could I see a pic or a plan of one please? I think my dad might be able to make one like that...
 
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