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That looks like a good idea with the space you have there. The woodwork aspect of it is probably what you want to get right before going any further. These raising and lowering counter style layouts can be trickier than they appear on paper. The key to smooth operation of raising and lowering is to have perfect right angles on the cross cuts. This will enable a snug fit when you lower the raised part.

Also make sure the hinges are securely fastened with no wiggle room as the drawbridge part needs to come down in exactly the same position each time if the tracks are to line up. Maybe have guides at each side to ensure the position is constant.

Good luck.
 

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QUOTE (Gwent rail @ 11 Jul 2006, 19:13) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>As an alternative to a folding layout, you could investigate the company that provides the equipment to raise and lower your layout with a pulley system. ( At least this would do away with the tricky marrying of the folding parts that Neil points out need to be spot on ) I've noticed them advertising in Railway Modeller a few times over the last couple of months. No doubt one of our members, with a better memory than me, will remember their name and post up the information. If not I'll dig out my back copies and find the info for you. All the best

I would at least have a think about this idea as an option as it does have some benefits. I am in the process of planning a layout in my garage and one part of my layout may need a raising and lowering part like you have in your plan. I am looking into all options to avoid doing this for the reasons mentioned above as I will have between four and eight tracks crossing at this point.
 

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QUOTE (John Webb @ 19 Aug 2006, 19:12) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The plasterboard should be fixed at regular intervals to vertical wood 'studding' which forms the main structural elements of the wall. If you can locate the studding either by detecting where the plasterboard is nailed to them or with a stud detector (often doubles up as a cable detector) you can fit brackets or other supports with ordinary wood screws through the plasterboard into the studding. There is less risk of damaging the plasterboard and no doubt about the carrying capacity.
Regards,
John Webb

I have to use this method to hang shelves in my house in Melbourne as it has pretty flimsy plasterboard walls. I use a stud finder to find where the wooden struts are. Be careful of the stud finder you use as I had a crap one which give wrong information and I put in screws and stuff where there were none and pictures came out with a substantial chunk of plaster. I found Stanley studfinders to be good.
 
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