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A great many kit built buildings pass through my hands and it is obvious (to me anyway!) than a large proportion of modellers are tortured by kit building. Crooked houses, lots of joints with big gaps, decals and stickers that are not square, paint that seems to have been brushed on with a 4" paint brush, glue spread all over, and so on and so forth.

I have one word for these tortured souls.

Skaledale!

And further advice.

Think of the Skaledale buildings that you would like to have on your layout and design your layout around the buildings rather than the other way around. Too many modellers make the buildings an afterthought yet in real life many buildings (most buildings?) were there before the track was laid and the track was laid to service the buildings. The same principals should apply to railway modelling. Follow this tip and you will produce the perfect layout with perfectly positioned buildings.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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Yep skaledale i think is going to become part of the furniture on many railway layouts in the future. Sort of a cross between lilliput lane and Harburn hobbies. BY the way I see someone has been tweaking the forum.
 

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Not tried any of the Scaledale range yet though I will admit they do look great. I put the cart before the horse and am fitting the buildings around the line, This is not really a problem as from the outset I left plenty of room for the landscape, the railway has to run through somewhere and not dominate the scene to much. There's a 4'x3' board at the end that only has 18" of twin tracks on it and that's down in a cutting and not on the same level as the town that fills the end board.
Yeah I noticed the tweaks too, I've lost my Bullied at the top and got a "Brit" instead, please can I have my Bullied back, nothing against "Brits" but I like the Merchant Navies much more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I've bought two Skaledale buildings, Goods shed and the latest signal box.I find them really good and excellent value for money. I'll also save me time building things. baseboards and rolling stock no problem but I find building construction a bore and something I'd rather avoid.

Ozzie21
 

· Paul Hamilton aka "Lancashire Fusilier"
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QUOTE (Ozzie21 @ 7 Apr 2006, 06:24) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I've bought two Skaledale buildings, Goods shed and the latest signal box.I find them really good and excellent value for money. I'll also save me time building things. baseboards and rolling stock no problem but I find building construction a bore and something I'd rather avoid.

Ozzie21

Agree with that. My love is the signals and DCC and point motors etc not buildings so rather the pro look of the Skaledales so I can spend more time building brass and white metal kits of LMS semaphore signals!
 

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I've built a few kits in recent months, some from Parkside, but the best I've built so far are from Cambrian. Excellent quality plastic kits, loads of detail, and reasonably priced. I'm just about to start the penultimate wagon in my track maintenance train.

Can any one recommend a kit with a crane that would have been used to lay track etc ? That would be a good challenge.
 

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To get back to where we started, kit building is what attracted me to this hobby in the first place. It's really down to what you want to produce. I like prewar steam with lots of old pre-grouping stock and locos kicking about, no two trucks or coaches the same and - as has been said before - a railway which fits around the existing geography, which means buildings of odd shapes and sizes. This means building your own. Now, I can't match the standards of RTR at the moment, so if Hornby want to do B5s, C4/5s, J11s, L3s and all those other kits I have stacked up I'll get my hand in my pocket. Since they won't, I have to get soldering.

I started with Parkside kits, went on to whitemetal and brass stock kits and now build my own locos. I was greatly helped by having a professional modelmaker in my local club (Always join your local club - they need your support and you can learn a lot from them) and encouraged by the prospect of being able to run my masterpieces (!) on an exhibition layout - which, eventually, they were good enough for.

I haven't yet started my layout since moving house but intend to. I expect we all do. Now buildings are not my strong suit, but I confidently expect that if I knock out a couple of coaches for someone I might get a building in return. Another reason for joining your local club and meeting other modellers.

If you want to start building, start with plastic - Parkside and Coopercraft are both easy enough. For whitemetal, 51L and David Geen are a good starting point. For brass rolling stock I'm not sure now D & S aren't producing, but for locos you can't go wrong with PDK. That's how brass kits ought to be.

Remember that if you are struggling to build a kit, it isn't necessarily your fault - it may be badly designed, badly etched or cast or have an error in the instructions. Read a kit building acount in one of the magazines and they invariably say 'Piece X was missing/bent/wrong and so I replaced it with...'. I have had nigthmares with kits until I've taken them along to the club and someone's suggested I try using someone else's bits or another method. I really struggled with a Genesis kit for an open wagon, thought it was just me, then saw them described (harshly) as a 'basis for scratchbuilding'.

There's a great deal of satisfaction to be had from building your own models and running them and in doing so you can support small manufacturers and improve your own skills as well. I can't encourage people to try it enough.
 

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I'd consider myself as a beginner in the kit building stakes, and the Cambrian was a little more difficult than the parkside ones. However, that's mainly because the instructions were a little unclear. Just bought a Borail, and the instructions on that are much better, IMO. That said, a couple of hours saw it all put together, then a few more with the paint brush, and I was very pleased with the results - much more pleased than I was with the results from a parkside kit.
 

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I have built a few of the Metcalfe kits and think they are great. My only complaint (if you can call it that) is that the majority of the N gauge range are only half relief.

I have also built several of the Kibri / Faller plastic kits. They are nice models (if a little continental) although the instructions are basically exploded pictures.

Chris
 
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