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QUOTE (34C @ 19 May 2021, 10:21) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I am so sorely tempted by the thought of advertising 'Mint in Box' Helbymann <cat no> class 36 no 36111 'Dame Notta Clew', with only a good quality mint (such as Fox's Glacier) within, just for the reaction.

What a delightfully wicked idea.....

I am still running the mental images of their reactions to different types of mint delight, with some having to pause to assuage the temptation to yummy the very object they would like to return.

Fox's, possibly packed for return...

After Eight, possibly packed for return...

Rococo Morrocan Mint Wafer Thins, eyed with definite intent...

Bulls Eyes / Everton mints, possibly nick one and return the rest in the hope nobody counts them back...

Walkers Mint Chocolate Eclairs, probably pack them with the After Eights...

Pacers / Spearmint Chews, send back through the Post Office - with no Postage Stamp...

Frys Five Boys, possibly, now, worth more that the electric motored, painted, shape it replaced, protect from heat and damp, deny ever received...

Julian
 

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Regarding GT3 - that was the subject! - it appears that all the significant troubles have been - lengthily - chewed through on RMweb, and there's enough information there for an owner to put things right if they wish, rather than simply return the item as unsatisfactory. (Had I ever wanted one, then I would have joined in the process, as knocking RTR OO models into shape as required is a commonplace, to the extent that in 80 odd loco purchases for myself I have yet to receive one that couldn't use a little attention somewhere.)

(Julian2011 @ 19 May 2021, 20:45) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>...Bulls Eyes / Everton mints, possibly nick one and return the rest in the hope nobody counts them back...
I'd know. Because it would be just one: 'Mint (singular) in box'. Very important that the description is completely accurate.
 

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Hi does it matter if you run your trains on the carpet or not ,if someone has found a solution to a problem that's got to be worth looking at and not turned into a joke .How else are we to move forward and help others. Jim
 

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QUOTE (kingjim @ 27 May 2021, 01:47) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi does it matter if you run your trains on the carpet or not ,if someone has found a solution to a problem that's got to be worth looking at and not turned into a joke .How else are we to move forward and help others. Jim

We probably all started with trains on the carpet and quickly learned that it wasn't conducive to reliable running.

But if one is putting one's self up as some kind of authority on the subject and wants to be taken seriously, you've gotta do it with a properly set up environment with the proper conditions that our models require. Playing trains on the carpet doesn't cut it!

I don't see of friends at Hornby magazine, for example, running trains on the carpet. They've got a proper layout where they evaluate things properly.

Said individual often makes comments about stuff derailing and blames the models. Of course he gets derailments: carpet isn't level and I think if you look closely, there are level changes with steps up onto 'scenic' sections. You can't possibly evaluate models reliably with those conditions.

Perhaps some of the 'solutions' only exist because of the 'problems' caused by playing trains on the carpet - an environment that all manufacturers tell us not to use ?
 

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Hi I think we have gone of the track lol I agree with what you are saying, but Chatham flyer said he had problems with the front bogie ,if it can be sorted to run on a carpet layout lol then it should run on a proper layout just trying to help, Jim.
 

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I agree that the guy's a grade A wally. For example, he described the doors between engine and tender as little flaps that he didn't know what they were for. He also always puts his fingers straight onto the models' paintwork when lifting them out of the box and examining them. Finger prints are very hard to remove completely, especially from the modern-day matt finishes. Christ, you used to even find them embedded in the paintwork on brand new Hornby models at the time that their first A4 was released and for some years beyond. The carpet-running also, with only a sheet of paper in between it and the track, is a joke. However, I find the suggestion that manufacturers should take any more notice than they already do of the fact that many people do this to be somewhat ludicrous as any pre-teen kid with half a brain knew, even back in the late 1950's (like me back then) not to run engines in this manner from the manufacturers own basic warnings (and also from common sense even if there were no warnings). Even running on my 6-foot by 4-foot base-boarded track fairly soon collected fluff. Spending too much time on a damned box is also so boring and anally retentive. One of the perils and downsides of the digital and social media age I suppose. The simple answer or moral of the story is that folks just shouldn't waste their time watching such crap.
 

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I agree that the guy's a grade A wally. For example, he described the doors between engine and tender as little flaps that he didn't know what they were for. He also always puts his fingers straight onto the models' paintwork when lifting them out of the box and examining them. Finger prints are very hard to remove completely, especially from the modern-day matt finishes. Christ, you used to even find them embedded in the paintwork on brand new Hornby models at the time that their first A4 was released and for some years beyond. The carpet-running also, with only a sheet of paper in between it and the track, is a joke. However, I find the suggestion that manufacturers should take any more notice than they already do of the fact that many people do this to be somewhat ludicrous as any pre-teen kid with half a brain knew, even back in the late 1950's (like me back then) not to run engines in this manner from the manufacturers own basic warnings (and also from common sense even if there were no warnings). Even running on my 6-foot by 4-foot base-boarded track fairly soon collected fluff. Spending too much time on a damned box is also so boring and anally retentive. One of the perils and downsides of the digital and social media age I suppose. The simple answer or moral of the story is that folks just shouldn't waste their time watching such crap.
Could not agree more...........trouble is he seems to have so many followers that hang off his every word!!
Mike
 

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According to a friend who knows about these things, Sam of Sam's Trains is actually quite clever. He has identified a large market that is easily sucked in and makes very good money out of it through the Youtube advertising. It really doesn't have much to do with model railways.
 

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Well of course as in most businesses there is some mutual back scratching going on as well, maybe we need as a forum some of this you tube advertising as well to boost membership
 

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According to a friend who knows about these things, Sam of Sam's Trains is actually quite clever. He has identified a large market that is easily sucked in and makes very good money out of it through the Youtube advertising. It really doesn't have much to do with model railways.
That’s probably true! I’m not saying that your friend is making it up, I’m saying that Sam may well be “cleverly“ exploiting the gullible.
I suppose one should say “well done“ to him but my cynical head just says “some people will do anything for money“! Like these dreadful wannabes one sees so much of these days.
I prefer to stick my head in the oven to be honest.
 

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...It really doesn't have much to do with model railways.
Absolutely. There are a great many others doing this type of thing for a very varied selection of niche interests. This has been going on 'forever', but in the 'time before internet' access to a potentially large group was very expensive, typically requiring publication of a magazine or newsletter. Now it is cheap to reach large numbers online.

'Sam' points to the failure of the pre-existing model railway press. There was opportunity to demonstrate their expertise if willing to sideline print and lead with an online operation. But those in position to do something different didn't want to leave their cosy little world where they were near unchallengeable experts.

I for one gave up on print for this and other interests, the moment the internet brought the world to my PC, and it became possible to exchange information with others in the activity of interest directly. And laughed mightily when one well known model railway mag editor referred to the opinions expressed on the internet as the work of a 'Taliban'. Not so, we are just folks who happen to know that better is possible, and should be made available.

I perceive these 'Sam' operations as useful. Manufacturers can learn from what is chewed over, if they choose to look. Those that don't look, learn and take action may well lose reputation among that very desirable group of customers, new entrants to the hobby.
 
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