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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While operating my layout the other day I noticed how much dust had accumulated on the top. This is really noticeable on some areas like buildings, immitation water and rolling stock. I wondered if any members had found any solutions they would like to share to remove dust without damaging their model rolling stock or buildings.
Or do most people not bother?


For scenery I did, stupidly use a vacuum cleaner once and removed a lot more than I intended.

Any good ideas?
 

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QUOTE (neil_s_wood @ 4 Sep 2006, 04:13) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>While operating my layout the other day I noticed how much dust had accumulated on the top. This is really noticeable on some areas like buildings, immitation water and rolling stock. I wondered if any members had found any solutions they would like to share to remove dust without damaging their model rolling stock or buildings.
Or do most people not bother?


For scenery I did, stupidly use a vacuum cleaner once and removed a lot more than I intended.

Any good ideas?


Hi Neil,

For delicate scenery I use a small vacuum cleaner intended for use with computer keyboards & such like.
For rolling stock I tend to use an old soft paint brush.
Hop ethis helps - be interesting to find out what other people do.

best regards
Brian
 

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'Stately Homes' have similar problems of removing unwanted dust without disturbing delicate wood, plaster or ceramic mouldings. From what I've seen of the National Trust in 'behind the scenes' TV programmes, they seem to use small vacuum cleaners near the items, the dust actually being whisked into the air with small soft paintbrushes. Sometimes for really delicate items the end of the vacuum cleaner tube is covered with a fine gauze to control the airflow and prevent any large chips which might come off being lost. Perhaps the books the NT have written on maintenance techniques might be worth looking at?
Regards,
John Webb
 

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Depending on how much of your scenery is actually attached to the baseboard, whether buildings or ballast,etc., you could try using a re-chargeable vacuum cleaner. With the motor of these not being too powerful, they may just be ideal. If you have the likes of loose ballast, then use a small brush as already suggested, with the cleaner a short distance away to collect just the main dust. Following on from the cleaning, could you not use some old bed-sheets as dust covers?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think we have a car vacuum which would fit the bill. If I put a large mesh that would allow the dust to go through and stop figures such as people and benches getting sucked up by the vacuum. I've actually found this to be and on going problem and this seems to be a good solution.
 

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With John Webbs idea of gauze over the end of the vaccum cleaner you also can 'catch' any thing sucked up into the bag.
Water surfaces,roof tops can be cleaned with a brush containing some detergent.
 

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Paul Hamilton aka &quot;Lancashire Fusilier&quot;
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I have an Air treatment system in the room that filters the air and removes something like 90% or more of the dust and odours which I find has eliminated any visible dust on the layout - other than that made by me drilling something!
 

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QUOTE (Lancashire Fusilier @ 5 Sep 2006, 17:49) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I have an Air treatment system in the room that filters the air and removes something like 90% or more of the dust and odours which I find has eliminated any visible dust on the layout - other than that made by me drilling something!
That sounds good is it part of your air con or is it a portable device?
 

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I use a battery powered mini vacuum cleaner with a piece of bendy plastic hose, about 1 cm diameter and 300mm long, gaffer taped to the inlet. This is used in conjunction with really soft brushes for delicate items and rolling stock. Being of a small diameter the end of the hose can be used to suck up the dust from the track bed and out of nooks and crannies whilst doing less damage to signals, station awnings and so on. It picks up any loose ballast as well.

Most sawing and sanding operations are now carried out in another room. This goes for spraying as well.

Because I like to leave my rolling stock in set trains on the layout stock does eventually attract a sort of ingrained dirt that can't be brushed off, particularly on carriage roofs. This is a bit like weathering. Eventually it becomes necessary to wash them.

Colombo
 
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