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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thanks for the input guys particularly on the track plan and the signals. I have now progressed to the wiring plan. I plan to use electrofrogs, and traditional cab control (3 sections) using my twin gaugemaster controller. I think I have drawn it right with no shorts but would appreciate help. Also, I understand 7/0.2 wire is the type to use, but will this produce voltage drops particular where there is a long runs, eg from control panel to rail break and back for isolation of track purposes. Sorry the image is on its side, not sure how to correct it. Thanks
K
 

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If I've read your diagram correctly, you've got the section switches the wrong way round. In one position the section will be powered from one controller, in the other position the two controllers will be connected together and nothing will go to the track!

The moving contact of the switch (usually the centre tab) needs to go to the track section, the controllers' output to one or other of the fixed contacts - usually the outer tabs.

Make the common line much larger than the section cable to minimise voltage drop - old 1sq mm lighting cable is ideal.

Re isolating sections: you only need one wire from isolating switch to the bit of track. Take the feed to the isolating switch from the cab control switch output for the section which the isolated track is part of.

'Railway Modelling - the Beginners Guide - No2 Baseboard, track and wiring' by Peco (50p) or their 'Wiring the layout - Part 1: First steps' for £1 booklet in their 'Shows you how' series show this in diagrams much better than I can draw here.

Hope this helps,
Regards,
John Webb
 

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QUOTE (John Webb @ 29 Sep 2006, 10:45) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>If I've read your diagram correctly, you've got the section switches the wrong way round. In one position the section will be powered from one controller, in the other position the two controllers will be connected together and nothing will go to the track!

The moving contact of the switch (usually the centre tab) needs to go to the track section, the controllers' output to one or other of the fixed contacts - usually the outer tabs.

Make the common line much larger than the section cable to minimise voltage drop - old 1sq mm lighting cable is ideal.

Re isolating sections: you only need one wire from isolating switch to the bit of track. Take the feed to the isolating switch from the cab control switch output for the section which the isolated track is part of.

'Railway Modelling - the Beginners Guide - No2 Baseboard, track and wiring' by Peco (50p) or their 'Wiring the layout - Part 1: First steps' for £1 booklet in their 'Shows you how' series show this in diagrams much better than I can draw here.

Hope this helps,
Regards,
John Webb
Thanks for the help John. I copied the switchs from a MRM magazine leaflet! but I can now see they are the wrong way round. Thanks the wiring suggestion to avoid voltage drop as well, sure I've got some of that lying around somewhere.
 

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Do you plan to use an electrofrog single slip? They are only available in Peco code 75 but they require the toes of the crossing to be wired via switches - or you can just leave them unpowered which is my "interim" solution.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
QUOTE (dwb @ 29 Sep 2006, 18:14) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Do you plan to use an electrofrog single slip? They are only available in Peco code 75 but they require the toes of the crossing to be wired via switches - or you can just leave them unpowered which is my "interim" solution.

David
Hi David
I plan to use insulfrog for that one so its not a problem.
Thanks
Keith
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Anyone got any pics of there control panels and some info on how they were made. Trying to figure out how to build mine, and whether it should be part of or separate from the baseboard. The layout will be at home, but must be capable of being taken apart. THe base boards consist of 2x 5ft by 2ft and 2x 4ft by 2ft. Any tips on how, to create electricial links between the baseboards that can be easily unplugged would be appreciated, thanks
K
 

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Hi
Below is my idea on how you need to strat to consider the cab wiring. Three main cab switches select either controller 1 or 2. Then the outputs go either directly to the rails or via SpST (On/Off) switches for isolating track selection etc.

Good luck
Brian

 

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If you use two-way centre-off switches for the Cab Sw1..3 in Brian's diagram above you can isolate the complete section if you wish to. This can reduce the number of individual isolating switches you need.

I would keep the control panel separate from the layout personally, but it does depend whether you have the room. On the old layout my father and I had some forty years ago one control panel was arranged to slid away under the baseboard to leave a clear passageway when not in use. Most people use the 25way computer 'D' plugs and sockets. If you are not practiced at soldering small connectors like this, you can buy ready-wired cables and cut these in half - use the socket part to run from the panel to the layout and the plug half to run from the layout to the connection from the panel. Use similar connections between the baseboards.
My current controlboard uses MDF for the base, sides and small vertical front; the actual panel (sloped at about 45 degrees) is 3mm hardboard - easier to drill for LEDs, switches etc than MDF and cheaper than metal.
Regards,
John Webb
 

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Have to agree with John... Centre off switches would give the edge.
As for control panels... I have built two recently and both were made from a 9mm MDF carcase. The panel front or top was from old display signs. Its a 3mm thick plastic, smooth white on the reverse and printed on the front (Original use is as an advertising poster) Off cuts of this material I get from my local sign manufactures who do a lot of display material for exhibitions. They are pleased to give old signs away once they know what its going to be used for. The one I have at the moment uses a board called 'Foamalite'. Turn the board over so as the white side is now the top of the panel and its brilliant. Simple to drill and line. I use car lining tape in various colours for this 2mm wide in red, yellow, green, black etc.
I use a length of piano hinge for the rear so as the panels top is held secure along its full length of the top edge with gravity holding it down onto the frame. Though magnetic cupboard catches could be used to secure it closed? I have not sloped mine so steeply as Johns, but have gone for around a 30 degree slope. The back edge is 31/2" deep while the front is 2" They were fixed to the layout on mating connector mounts (Flush Mounts) as shown here - http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.js...77&id=11423 . As John has suggested I to have used 25 way D connectors. Reversing socket and plug on the panel ensures you don't plug the wrong lead into the wrong connection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks John and Brian for the very useful advice and suggestions, it seriously helps. For the computer cable, is this best sourced from Maplin?
 

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I cannot help over where the best buys for computer cables are. A local computer supplier (and I don't mean any of the large chains) may sometimes have special offers on these which may be better than Maplins.
(On my current layout I went mostly for larger plugs and sockets with crimped terminals - a bit quicker and eliminates the 'burnt finger' risk.)
Regards,
John Webb
 

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QUOTE (John Webb @ 1 Oct 2006, 13:57) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I cannot help over where the best buys for computer cables are. A local computer supplier (and I don't mean any of the large chains) may sometimes have special offers on these which may be better than Maplins.
(On my current layout I went mostly for larger plugs and sockets with crimped terminals - a bit quicker and eliminates the 'burnt finger' risk.)
Regards,
John Webb
Thanks John, must admit not having much luck finding the right cables on Maplin, not a great web site for navigating.
Had another look are these the right ones:
http://www.maplin.co.uk/Search.aspx?criter...9L&DOY=3m10
 

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Hi keekster64

No
But these are Maplins D cables
However, at £6.99 you may be able to buy them cheaper elsewhere? Also remember to buy Male / Female or plug / socket leads as these give both ends needed. Don't buy Printer cables (Centronics) as these have one plug that can't easily be used.
Or if your fairly good at soldering then these are the basic items needed D connectors Dont forget for each one where a cable is to be connected then Hoods will be required D Connector Hoods Again these may not be the cheapest around. Here is a link to the 'Rapid' site info Rapid who appear to be much cheaper?

Good luck
 

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QUOTE (Brian @ 3 Oct 2006, 14:42) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi keekster64

No
But these are Maplins D cables
However, at £6.99 you may be able to buy them cheaper elsewhere? Also remember to buy Male / Female or plug / socket leads as these give both ends needed. Don't buy Printer cables (Centronics) as these have one plug that can't easily be used.
Or if your fairly good at soldering then these are the basic items needed D connectors Dont forget for each one where a cable is to be connected then Hoods will be required D Connector Hoods Again these may not be the cheapest around. Here is a link to the 'Rapid' site info Rapid who appear to be much cheaper?

Good luck
Cheers Brian, much appreciated. Now know what to look for.
K
 
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