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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As part of improvements to my attic I am planning to install a lighting track. The system I have found has a lot of fittings which take GU10 PAR16 style bulbs. Mindful of the fact that it would be very easy to overload the lighting circuit and create undesirable hot spots with halogen fittings I am considering using LED replacements. Whilst I can see the power ratings for these replacements, I have not been able to find any references which suggest what the light output they produce.

My questions are

1) Are LED replacement lamps of this type any good?

2) At what sort of distance from the work surface are they effective?

David
 

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David,
If you can get a look at one, there may be a data sheet with it which will tell you what the light output is for comparison with halogen lamps.
Alternatively track down the maker's web-site and they should have the information there.

I thought G10 were mains voltage halogen? are these LED lamps direct replacements? Only I've only come across G6.5 LED 12V replacement bulbs or even smaller LED fittings so far.

I'd be interested in what you find - my impression is that the beam angles available in LED is a narrow range compared to the 12V halogen.
Regards,
John Webb
 

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Hi David,

The G10 LED lamps tend to be a tad "blueish".

A better bet may be the CFL (compact flourescent lamp). We have used them (including gradually in my own house as we upgrade). The 11w actually gives the equivelent of a 50w halogen. The cool white/4000k gives excellent colour rendering & a bit cheaper than the LED variety.

They give about half instant light after about 1 second & are fully run up (no flicker though) after about 5 minutes. Lamp life is quoted at 15,000 hrs.

BTW - some of the LED types that we have fitted in the past do run quite warm.

If you want further details send me a PM.

Just noticed that you are proposing to use lighting tracks - if this is the case then some fittings will not take GU10 LED/CFL's are these lamps can be longer than standard GU10's.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
>I thought G10 were mains voltage halogen? are these LED lamps direct replacements?
John, You are correct, they are and these lamps are a direct replacement.

>CFL (compact flourescent lamp)
dbc50, I think I know the kind of thing you mean. We've had something very like that in the wall lights in our living room for more years than I can remember. Changing 4 x 100W incandescents for them must have saved me a small fortune over the years.

The reason for opting for a track is that I can place the light where it is needed. The present arrangement is two single 36w flourescent fittings. They illuminate the central area very well, but the railway is out to the sides and the side to the rear of the fittings is quite dark. It has got a bit brighter since I installed double sided foil insulation, but I'd still like to add spots of some kind especially since I've "reclaimed" some space on the dark side of the water tanks.

Here's a link to the website I found the track details on. This company do quite a range of stuff and this is the one that seems to be a reasonable price - or at least I am prepared to pay it. For fittings I was thinking of the ones in the high teens / low twenties price bracket.

My choice of G10 was based on direct LED replacement. The decision on 240v is based on the lower cost. Transformers for the low voltage track systems appear to be very expensive.

I have not made a final decision. If someone suggests a better solution, I will certainly consider it.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE dwb, I don't know if there's anything amongst the selection here that may be suitable. There seems to be mains voltage LED GU10's and low energy GU10's available. The LED data sheet qoutes 3000mcd and a power of 1.5w so I wouldn't have thought they're going to be very bright.

Thanks for that gofer, it's exactly the kind of information I am looking for. I just wish I knew what 3000mcd might mean in terms of "experience". I guess that mcd is milli candellas and despite the fact that I spent one of my summer vacations working as a draughtsman for a consulting electrical engineer doing lighting calculations and drawings and so on, it's so long ago, I can't remember it and it was probably lumens in any case.

I'm not so concerned about the lower watts consumed by "efficient" light bulbs as it's light output I am after.

David
 

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Sorry David I can't help you with light output as my knowledge of all things light related doesn't stretch that far. The description does say however "These high efficiency GU10 lamps use 20 LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes) to give a bright, vibrant beam of light" so anybody's guess I suppose.

There are some other lighting bits and pieces from the same site here if you haven't already found them :

http://www.rapidonline.com/products.aspx?t...ier3=Power+LEDs

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I found this article on Wikipedia. It does shed some light
on the subject. The one thing I have learned from reading around the subject is that halogens are the LAST thing I want in the attic. They achieve their brightness from burning very hot so they could easily become a fire risk in such a confined space.

The best approach may be to buy some LED lamps and see how it goes.

David
 

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Thanks for the link David. You're right about halogens and heat. I find even the ones in our bathroom start to burn the top of my head if I take too long shaving
If you do try some LED GU10's I'd be very interested to hear what you think of them.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
QUOTE I find even the ones in our bathroom start to burn the top of my head if I take too long shaving
Another reason not to take on that ritual, and I've not much protection on top either


David
 

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I did some simple calculations and worked out if I lit my layout with halogens they would use several times as much power as the actual layout - DCC, (future) computer control and all!
 

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HI
GU10 LED mains (230v) lamps are readily available but don't offer great illumination. They are often used where a large number of down lights are installed in a ceiling and then every other or third lamp is an LED. They provide around a third to half of the illumination level of a standard GU10 halogen lamp. There cost is very high compared to halogen lamps - Cheapest I've found is around £5.00 each!
Emetco Electrical Supplies
 

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David,

The GU10 LED lamps that give an amount of light equivelent to even a 20w are very expensive - over the weekend I'll post a pic of the CFL & quote you a price.

best regards
Brian
 

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QUOTE (dwb @ 27 Jun 2007, 18:21) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>As part of improvements to my attic I am planning to install a lighting track. The system I have found has a lot of fittings which take GU10 PAR16 style bulbs. Mindful of the fact that it would be very easy to overload the lighting circuit and create undesirable hot spots with halogen fittings I am considering using LED replacements. Whilst I can see the power ratings for these replacements, I have not been able to find any references which suggest what the light output they produce.

My questions are

1) Are LED replacement lamps of this type any good?

2) At what sort of distance from the work surface are they effective?

David
Hello David,
Have you considered those rope lights that come in 6ft and up lenghts/strings with small what looks like grain of wheat lamps wired in a heavy plastic tubing?
The strings are suitable for outdoor use.They come in all white and at Christmas in colours.
I have used them to great effect as they give a very good overall blanketing lighting effect and not spotty like separate lamps.
I use mine in conjunction with dimmer switches giving a pleasant late evening and nighttime lighting.Also you can run them at not fullest brightness thus saving wear and tear and early burn out.
They do not run hot.
Just a thought,
Bryan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
QUOTE Have you considered those rope lights that come in 6ft and up lenghts/strings with small what looks like grain of wheat lamps wired in a heavy plastic tubing?

I hadn't. It's an interesting idea but I am rather set on being able to place light just where I want it. Thanks for the suggestion.

David
 
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