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Paul Hamilton aka "Lancashire Fusilier"
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I think you are going along well and will have really made a lot of head way into mastering soldering after this one.

I must get me one of those kits too I think for my Midland box. Looks like it will be the Dickens to paint when done though. Do you leave the roof off? Put in an interior?
 

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Just another modeller
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Hi Paul

look here for your Midland box - and footbridge kit too

http://www.s116810171.websitehome.co.uk/17133.html

regards

Richard

QUOTE (Lancashire Fusilier @ 6 Feb 2009, 14:12) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I think you are going along well and will have really made a lot of head way into mastering soldering after this one.

I must get me one of those kits too I think for my Midland box. Looks like it will be the Dickens to paint when done though. Do you leave the roof off? Put in an interior?
 

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Chief mouser
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Keep up the good work David - it's almost making me think of having a go! (watch out Brian, if it goes wrong...)

Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Thank you Peter and Richard for the pointers on soldering. I will have another go over the weekend.

Re: Patience
The steps took a while but there is a half etched slot for each step in the side runner. So my technique was tin on runner on the under side of the slot. Tin each end of the underside of the step and insert. The instructions tell you to do the top and bottom step first, which is excellent advice. The posts at the top and bottom have pieces on each side, that's 8 in total, to thicken them up. I seem to remember having problems with one of them but apart from that it was fairly straight forward. I think the steps took about 4 hours in total, so I won't be taking commissions


QUOTE Looks like it will be the Dickens to paint when done though. Do you leave the roof off? Put in an interior?

I plan to spray all over with primer and then we'll see.

I do plan to add a Wills interior and some lights and a fire effect in the stove. I was thinking of using a loco decoder for the flicker....

Thanks for the encouragement.

David
 

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Chief mouser
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QUOTE (Brian Considine @ 6 Feb 2009, 18:59) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>it makes mine look good !


Such modesty - compared to my attempts

regards
 

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Paul Hamilton aka &quot;Lancashire Fusilier&quot;
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I like the sound of what you are proposing regarding the interior. Here is the post on my attempts at the Wills interior so far for what it's worth.

Wills Interior

The desk lamp was made using a tiny 0.8mm LED from Richard J and some of his fancy wire that I never remember the name of all super glued together. Never thought of the fire box flicker effect in the stove though. Is there a cheaper alternative than a loco decoder in there? Just thought I would look and a TCS 2 function decoder that has no motor drive, just functions definitely has fire box flicker.

TCS 2 Function Only Decoder
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I like the way that Wills interior looks
and thanks for finding those TCS decoders.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
That's an interesting piece of kit Expat.

Thanks
David
 

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Paul Hamilton aka &quot;Lancashire Fusilier&quot;
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Indeed that looks like alot of fun when powering up your layout's lighting where not all lights in houses and buildinga and the street all come on at once. Adds a nice animation dimesnion to layout lighting. What's that unit cost?
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
After a couple of hours rework, the end of the signal box now looks like this:-



I need to get my hands on some desoldering braid to make the job easier

David
 

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All the major soldering work has been completed. I found the easiest way for me to attach the brackets was to add the rear part first and then attach the bracket part. This is a close up of how one of them turned out:



It is time to make a start on the base. This is not included in the kit but you do get drawings to indicate where the windows and door should go. I've decided to make an inner skeleton of 1.5mm card which I purchased some time ago to build a Scalescenes retaining wall. I was considering using Scalescenes dark brown brick for the completed surface but having seen what Jim can achieve with plastic card on his New Street layout, I've decided to try some too.

Having build the base skeleton, I just had to do a trial run to see what it looks like. The roofing material is Wills and comes in the kit. It is held up under the eaves with a spot of blue tack.



You will notice that the building extends down below ground level. This is because I want the building to appear to rise up out of the earth rather than just sit on it.

David
 

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Very nice piece of work Dave.

Good luck with the card base. It's good to see the old building methods coming back into fashion. I think many of us have become complacent with all of the ready-made this and the pre-formed that. Keep us posted on your progress.
 

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QUOTE (Expat @ 23 Feb 2009, 05:12) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Very nice piece of work Dave.

Good luck with the card base. It's good to see the old building methods coming back into fashion. I think many of us have become complacent with all of the ready-made this and the pre-formed that. Keep us posted on your progress.
Yes and the trouble with this is that many layouts are all looking a bit samey.

Looking good David. I agree plasticard would be far better than using paper for the brick.
 

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I ordered a Logan 2000 push style mat (mount) cutter on Thursday evening and it turned up this morning. As I felt a bit under the weather, we decided not to go out today so I tried to take my mind off my ills by seeing whether I could make anything of it. As readers of Jim-sw's layout thread will know, it is Jim's idea to use a mount cutter for creating bevelled edges in Plasticard so that you get better looking corners. He also commented on "wobbly" cuts which is definitely a bit of a problem when starting out. Whether or not it would be easier with one of the fancier cutters which come complete with parallel edge, I don't know and am unlikely too at £150 plus.

I did have several failures - both end walls started out as back walls but the second bevelled cut was a miserable failure, so I cut again to the shorter width. I've still got a couple of offcuts which are almost but not quite the same width as the back


I must have spent between 5 and 6 hours getting from the last photo to these. The problem with doing things in small stages is that you can't see the overall change. Each little change doesn't seem to do very much and constantly looking at the detail under a 4x magnifier does make the corners look really dodgy indeed.

About the only tip of my own to pass on from this episode is that I found it a great help to sellotape (and it was Sellotape) the plasticard to the steel rule to ensure that it wouldn't move when I was cutting it. I must have got through yards of the stuff.

Enough of the blather, here are some photos and though I say it myself I think the box is starting to look like one now. In fact it's so much like the real thing, I've taken three photos for your viewing pleasure.







I made some other purchases on Thursday night which are still in transit - some Ratio brick arch edging, a Wills interior kit, an aerosol of etch primer and some Railmatch dark brick paint.

David
 

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looks good David, by the time you've finished it you'll have a model to be proud of.

Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
The problem with building a signal box with a brick base is that you need arches over the windows. Carved holes in the plain brick work just don't look right. I didn't fancy creating my own and thought that the brick arches made by Ratio might be suitable. These duly arrived in the post during the week but they were far too big so it was time for plan B.

I bought various thicknesses of plain plasticard and found that 20 thou matched the thickness of the brick card I have used. Before I started this project I thought I might be able to clad the base with Scale Scenes brick paper and arches. Although I haven't used the brick paper, I have been using the arches as templates; first for cutting out the shapes and now as a template for creating the arches themselves. I cut out an arch of the size required and glued it to the plain plasticard with PVA. Then I cut around the arch to get the required shape. The PVA holds just long enough to get the shape about right. I then created some V shaped indentations to give the impression of brick courses but it's no more than an impression. It's not perfect but to do any better, I'd need a computer controlled router as I'm working at the limit of my dexterity.

The final stage of this process was to cut away the plain brick using the newly created arch as a template and glue the arch in the gap. Although the first one took some time, the others were somewhat quicker.

Whilst carving away at the brickwork for the arches, I felt that the sides of the window openings should also have some brick cladding. I cut some very thin strips brick, widened the openings in the card skeleton and glued the edgings in place.

Although this has taken a few hours to do, visual progress is very little so I've mocked up a surrounding base with some offset cuts of board and dropped the signal box into the gap. This allows the steps to be rested against one end. The planking around the top windows is some Evergreen styrene strip which I bought at the same time as the plasticard. I didn't fancy my chances at cutting some suitably thin strips myself.

Here's the result:


The next step is painting; something I've been trying to avoid. I need to find a large box to act as a spray booth.....

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
One large box, a can of etch primer, a set of acrylics, some Phoenix and Railmatch enamels, three teeny weeny brushes, a head mounted binocular magnifier and rather a lot of time has produced this:-





I'm still looking for something to mix a grey in for the mortar wash on the brick work. I've not managed to find a palette yet and I'm not sure when my next Dolmio day is, but I'll use the lid if I can grab it before it is discarded. I still haven't tracked down a slate grey either. I could have had any number of rail company related greys but not for slate. I know Humbrol do a couple so maybe a trip to Squires might do the trick.

There's no windows in yet either. The rather curious effect you see in the photos is the white acrylic I've rough brushed over the grey primer on the interior walls. You may just be able to make the start of the interior. There are a couple of block instruments on the shelf but the lever frame has not yet been assembled.

The colours were chosen based on the St. Albans Box photos that John Webb has published.

David
 
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