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I spotted this whilst browsing the Hornby website. There was somebody looking for guidence on which oils to use on models and clearly Hornby staff on the front line should have a very good idea which oils work best:-

QUOTE By Kenn (Hornby)
Tue 2 Jan 2007 15:38
Hello again,

I have discussed this "lubrication" issue with our repair engineers...

The best type of oil is something like "sewing machine" oil or just a general "light" oil... "3 in One." use any oil sparingly.

Internal gearing which is inaccesable is usualy greased. "Model Railway Grease" is available from various stockists. A Google search will find what you need...

Hope this helps..

Kenn

A lot of us seem to use WD-40 and this really is not a good idea as it is too thin to do any lasting good.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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QUOTE (Gary @ 16 Feb 2007, 10:32) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I spotted this whilst browsing the Hornby website. There was somebody looking for guidence on which oils to use on models and clearly Hornby staff on the front line should have a very good idea which oils work best:-

A lot of us seem to use WD-40 and this really is not a good idea as it is too thin to do any lasting good.

Happy modelling
Gary

Oh dear,

Do people REALLY still use WD 40 on railway models?

And as for 3 in 1!!

Basically only use a light macine oil ie sewing machine oil.

Regards

John
 

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I agree with MMD, Labelle make the best lubricants for model purposes. I also would add AeroTech lubricants. They make a ripper motor bearing lube. Perfect for can motors.

Ozzie21

QUOTE (Makemineadouble @ 17 Feb 2007, 00:15) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The best lubricants

Labell

Labell

They can be found at shows I bought my supply right here in the UK
 

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QUOTE (Gary @ 16 Feb 2007, 20:32) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I spotted this whilst browsing the Hornby website. There was somebody looking for guidence on which oils to use on models and clearly Hornby staff on the front line should have a very good idea which oils work best:-

A lot of us seem to use WD-40 and this really is not a good idea as it is too thin to do any lasting good.

Happy modelling
Gary

I use light machine oil for appropriate places and I find vaselene works very well as grease for 'heavy duty' use such as bearings, gears and drive shafts.

Graham Plowman
 

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QUOTE (Makemineadouble @ 16 Feb 2007, 13:15) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The best lubricants

Labell

Labell

They can be found at shows I bought my supply right here in the UK


I've heard very good reports about Labell, but I never seem to be able to find it.

HO ;
For spindles etc I use either Fleischmann or Roco oil - both are very light and seem to have a property that keeps the oil in place.

For gears I use either Trix or Roco grease.

LGB :
I use the LGB oils & grease.

As will all lubricants "little & often" is the key.
 

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As we're on the subject of lubrication, I have a question.

"Is there any point in a tiny drop of a suitable oil on pin point steel axles in brass bearing cups?".

I have a couple of Parkside kits where I am having great difficulty in getting the wheels to spin freely.

David
 

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QUOTE (dwb @ 18 Feb 2007, 11:04) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>As we're on the subject of lubrication, I have a question.

"Is there any point in a tiny drop of a suitable oil on pin point steel axles in brass bearing cups?".

I have a couple of Parkside kits where I am having great difficulty in getting the wheels to spin freely.

David

Give it a try - have done this myself on occasions.
 

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I have a similar thing on the odd occaison. What I do is with the wheelset in the axle box squeeze the axle boxes together using your fingers. Manufacturers often nthe the pinpoint axle a bit to sharp and it digs into the brass bearing cup. BY squeezing the axle boxes you put a slight indentation in the cup that should allow the axle to turn freely. I then use a stuff called "Grease em" from Kadee. It's a powered graphite lubricant and very useful for brass bearings such as cup bearings.

Ozzie21

QUOTE (dwb @ 18 Feb 2007, 22:04) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>As we're on the subject of lubrication, I have a question.

"Is there any point in a tiny drop of a suitable oil on pin point steel axles in brass bearing cups?".

I have a couple of Parkside kits where I am having great difficulty in getting the wheels to spin freely.

David
 

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I have asked this question on numerous ocasions. Reference to greases, brought replies that greases must be suitable to apply on model plastic parts. Apparently grease compounds can damage plastics in making plastic brittle.
 

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I am sure I replied to all the suggestions yesterday, but since it's not here, I must assume I hit the wrong button.

Thanks for the suggestions. I have some Kadee "Grease 'em" so I'll try that first.

David
 

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QUOTE (double00 @ 20 Feb 2007, 14:24) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I have asked this question on numerous ocasions. Reference to greases, brought replies that greases must be suitable to apply on model plastic parts. Apparently grease compounds can damage plastics in making plastic brittle.


Thats why Roco, Trix & LGB produce their own grease suitable for their own models & yes I have models from all three, & yes I use the correct lubricants. Those that know me are aware that my models are made to work (one of my LGB locos has done so many miles its now on it's 4th set of driving wheels !).

I can never understand the philosophy of spending (in some case's) many £1,000's on locomotives & then using the likes of WD40/3-in-one on them
 
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