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Oh dear..
Who's doing the proof reading at the Hornby Magazines HQ (Or not doing it possibly)???


Page 42/43 review on the Bachmann Dynamis "The ELITE at a glance". err it's the Dynamis at a glance!!!

Page 47 Signalling Basics. Picture shows a two aspect signal at red. Text states "The twin-aspect colour light is the most basic and consists of a red light at the top and a green light below which light etc ...... errr RED IS AT THE BOTTOM!
Now those were picked up while 'thumbing through the mag' sitting in the car waiting for SHMBO to return from shopping.
Wonder how many more there are??
 

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Re the signalling article, it's correct in the text and the actual drawings, I note.
Fails to make clear a subsidiary light on a post only has two white lights and no red aspect. Also fails to mention that some of the latest ground subsidiary signals using LEDs show two red lights at danger and two white lights for clear.

There's a couple of numbering errors on 'Plan 4' showing the possible modelling of Weymouth Town station.

Nothing else so far has caught my eye.

Regards,
John
 

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I have to admit I have only spotted the Dynamis/Elite one - but I haven't read the mag in depth yet.

Regards
 

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It's unfortunate that HM has contained not just proof reading errors, which can be difficult to spot if reading on computer screens, but also several factual errors, and not just in this issue either!

The signalling article contains more than mistake and issue 11 had several fundamental errors in the goods vehicle article. Incorrect dates in the matter of yellow end panel introduction for diesels and errors the coaching stock code information also show more than a lack of proof reading.

It is not good enough, especially if HM is occupying the position of catering for new hobby entrants or re-entrants, to be putting forward so much incorrect information, which most newcomers will reasonably enough take as gospel.

Still an excellent magazine, especially in its layout and photography, and it deserves to prosper if only because it has shaken most of the others off their self-satisfied perches!

"Has great potential, but could do better if he paid attention to detail", as one of my school reports said!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE (Brian @ 10 May 2008, 16:15) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Oh dear..
Who's doing the proof reading at the Hornby Magazines HQ (Or not doing it possibly)???


Page 42/43 review on the Bachmann Dynamis "The ELITE at a glance". err it's the Dynamis at a glance!!!

Page 47 Signalling Basics. Picture shows a two aspect signal at red. Text states "The twin-aspect colour light is the most basic and consists of a red light at the top and a green light below which light etc ...... errr RED IS AT THE BOTTOM!
Now those were picked up while 'thumbing through the mag' sitting in the car waiting for SHMBO to return from shopping.
Wonder how many more there are??


Oh, and there's more... P47 Signalling. "Left: The four aspect colour light......It shows four different aspects on the approach to a red signal: green, double AMBER, single AMBER etc.. " NO Signals don't show AMBER (Traffic lights do!) Signals show YELLOW aspects, single or double, flashing or static, but never ever amber! And the same error is also on page 46 for that diagram. Yet in the main text body it is correctly called a Yellow aspect!
The other item that gets a signalling engineers heckles up is the term being used "Feather" Its a Junction Indicator (nick named a feather) There's no mention of how many white lights are displayed either. Older signalling has three while post 1980's signalled areas have five
individual white lights. How about the six positions they can be found in? No mention at all of those.
Position light shunt signals the text for the drawing states "Shows a red and white light to indicate the line ahead is blocked.... etc" It may well be blocked (or it may be clear) but the red & white means STOP do not proceed past this signal.

Still a brill mag though
 

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Obviously the basic errors could, indeed should, have been seen before printing, but I am yet to see an article on modern signalling in any modelling mag which adequately describes the signalling we have over here.
 

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QUOTE The other item that gets a signalling engineers heckles up is the term being used "Feather" Its a Junction Indicator (nick named a feather)

My mate is a senior signal design engineer for Network Rail and he calls them feathers
- I can just about live with that one, feathers (sic) only had 3 lights on the Southern Region iirc the others have always used 5.

I gave up after reading about the amber and double amber signals.

QUOTE I am yet to see an article on modern signalling in any modelling mag which adequately describes the signalling we have over here.

You might do, one day in the not too distant future
 

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QUOTE My mate is a senior signal design engineer for Network Rail and he calls them feathers ohmy.gif - I can just about live with that one, feathers (sic) only had 3 lights on the Southern Region iirc the others have always used 5.
What his name I probaly know him. There are very few designers left in NR, most work for contractors! He probalby uses the term 'Feather as Junction Indicator isnt very self explanatory. Ask him what they are really called in signalling design systems. They are - Position Light Junction Indicators.
Sometimes they are also referred to as 'Lunar lights', but again thats a nick name.

QUOTE You might do, one day in the not too distant future wink.gif
Hmmm Hope thats a Yellow distant
 

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QUOTE (Brian @ 14 May 2008, 15:21) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hmmm Hope thats a Yellow distant


Very good - you just made my day!

Regards
 

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QUOTE (hairyhandedfool @ 14 May 2008, 12:16) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Obviously the basic errors could, indeed should, have been seen before printing, but I am yet to see an article on modern signalling in any modelling mag which adequately describes the signalling we have over here.
Problem is that there are still quite a few systems in use and every article tries to do too much in one go. I was quite suprised by a recent Modelrail article that said that Tokenless Block is now obsolete as we use it down the entire West of England Line! In the three boxes I have worked, which are all still in use, I have operated No Signalman Token & Absolute Block, and currently on our panel we have Track circuit Block and Tokenless Block. Many boxes actually use 2 or even more systems on different sections of their patch.
The real problem is that signal layout is very specific to a track plan and even then you can have an argument about what the best solution is.
Semaphores are getting rarer but they have just installed some new ones down at Yeovil Pen Mill, they now move the proper way instead of drooping when a train needs to go.


If you are really interested then the railway rule book is now online and if you follow this link it will expliain some of the different systems. These have appeared on several forums now.
http://www.rgsonline.co.uk/docushare/dsweb...4/Collection-58

This pdf is the official module on signals.
http://www.rgsonline.co.uk/docushare/dsweb...il-41346/S1.pdf
 

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It seems we've made a couple of errors in the latest issue of Hornby Magazine, particularly in relation to the colour light signalling article, but I'd like to take the opportunity to put the magazine's point of view across.

As I'm sure you can imagine, we all work hard to ensure Hornby Magazine is as accurate as possible and well presented at the same time. We take every step possible to ensure that the content is correct. However, from time to time errors do creep in, sometimes forced by our reference sources. Much has been written about railways but our writers weren't around to experience every development in the BR steam era first hand, so we have to rely on second hand information in many cases. Wherever possible, we check the source and will be happy to publish corrections where significant errors inadvertently occur.

The signalling article, as the headline suggests, was aimed as a basic guide to colour light signalling. The real railway is open to many variations in signalling and we would never aim to cover the entire subject in one four page article. The article produced merely skims the surface of a complex subject which could be, and has been, turned into a book all of its own.

With this in mind we feel that the article achieved its aims, but equally there are errors in the text.

The red light always appears at the bottom of a two-aspect colour light signal as shown in the diagram on page 47 of issue 12. The fact that the caption states that the aspects appear the other way round is simply a typing error which, in fairness, should have been spotted before publication.

With reference to the terminology used - 'amber' and 'feather' for example - we used these terms to keep the language simple so that everyone, and not just those with a thorough understanding of signalling, could understand the subject in its basic form. The use of the word 'amber' is unfortunate, but many modellers and railway enthusiasts do use it.

Hornby Magazine is produced by a small team of highly dedicated and enthusiastic writers and a group of proof readers, myself included. However, we do work to tight deadlines in order to produce a monthly magazine and, sometimes, in the busy days in the lead up to deadline, the large number of pages which make up Hornby Magazine have to be processed quicker than we would like. That, unfortunately, is a fact of working with magazines.

With ever tighter deadlines to keep things topical to suit the ever more discerning readership, we simply don't have the luxury of time to keep re-proofing pages and asking others to check them as well. Sometimes corrections are done last minute on screen and as one forum member has pointed out, this can make it difficult to spot errors. Just like the readers, we sometimes spot errors on the pages of the magazine as soon as we get copies and kick ourselves that we didn't pick them up before. But the human brain reads what it thinks it has written and is prone to 'over ride' some smaller typos.

I hope you will all continue to enjoy Hornby Magazine and rest assured that we will be stepping up another gear with the aim of producing higher quality issues in the future.

Happy modelling.

Mike Wild, Editor.
 

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Mike, you are undoubtedly are aware that your readership includes some fastidious rivet counters and perfectionists


Most of us mortals pass over this sort of stuff.

At least it keeps you on your toes


Carry on with the good work.
 

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QUOTE (Mike Wild @ 29 May 2008, 20:05) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The use of the word 'amber' is unfortunate, but many modellers and railway enthusiasts do use it.
Often people use the "wrong" terminology but that's how life really is - we have a regular customer that always calls signals "traffic lights" - at the end of the day we know what he means & that's really all that matters.

I really thought that most of the Hornby Magazine readers were a little more laid back.
 

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Its a matter of opinion, being traincrew for twenty years i have never been in a cab and said 'the position light junction indicator is off' ! The railway has always used nicknames especially with track and signalling, thats why we have dummies, feathers, boards and bobbies and despite what modern companies want us to call them or their correct textbook terminology, we always will have!

paul
 
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