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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Whilst looking through the Westerham Valley Railway book I came across the pic below and thought I'd make the van body for my layout. The body is made to 7mm scale but could easily be made in the larger scales I'm not so sure about the smaller ones though.



I made a drawing with the dimensions taken from an existing van and by guessing from the photograph. The drawing consists of one end and one side.

This was scanned, copied, pasted and printed to produce what you see below, the printed paper was stuck to some mount board and when dry painted with one coat of shellac, to harden the paper.



I make two cuts along the planking lines very close together and the peel off the tiny cut strip. You can see these as white lines in about 1/4 of the planking.

This shows the parts cut out, the sliding doors glued to the sides and the various other bits of wood, metal strapping and odds and ends in place. When these are finished another coat of shellac will be applied before gluing together to form the body.



It's a really cheap way of making a van or wagon and very absorbing it is too, mine is going to be flat on the floor no W irons by the way, I ain't that good.

The steel cladding at the corners is cut from thin cartridge paper, I also used very thin card for the roof to make it look really floppy, cereal packet card is good for nice straight and proper roofs.

I found an old tube of Seccotine, still in good condition after twenty years and used blobs of that for the bolt and rivet heads. I'd forgotten how careful you need to be and so made a bit of a mess off it, ah well.



It's been painted with Humbrol matt to start with and then a few layers of thin Acrylic to weather it and finally just to try it, someones attempt to re-paint it, I used Acrylic for this as well, it seems to work OK with the brush marks drying out as does enamel paint.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dear Neil,

Thanks, but I must say that it isn't my idea I got it from a book published by E. Rankine Grey in 1949 and called Cardboard rolling stock and how to make it.

Its quite a useful technique for making wooden buildings as well.

Jim
 

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I like that Jim,Im using card and glue more often now for a number of reasons,1 its easy to use,sand down etc..2 model shops are quite a distance from my house and the garage my cortina is in is a fair walk away.It would cost me almost £1'000 pa. to park in town. Looks good
 

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QUOTE (jimread @ 17 Feb 2009, 11:23) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Dear Neil,

Thanks, but I must say that it isn't my idea I got it from a book published by E. Rankine Grey in 1949 and called Cardboard rolling stock and how to make it.

Its quite a useful technique for making wooden buildings as well.

Jim
Yes Jim, the wood effect is quite good for paper.

cheers

Neil
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Dear Brian,

Thank you for your nice comment.

The van body is finished I am going to use as a trackside store or maybe even the goods shed on my layout.

I do understand what you mean about finished so I'm sure you'd like to see one that is;



The drawing was photocopied from an old MRN magazine and made in the same way as the van body, this time the roof is made from cereal packet card. The wheels are Slaters and the odds and ends from ABS. To add some avoirdupois there are a couple of lead fishing weights glued to the underside.

Another reason for making models in this way is that they look as though they've been used, odd gaps in the planking, the doors no longer fit quite right etc.

Jim
 

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***Magic stuff Jim - Hands on modelling is all too rare and you've shown two great examples - both look great but I particularly like the attention to detail on your cattle wagon!

Richard

QUOTE (jimread @ 17 Feb 2009, 18:02) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Dear Brian,

Thank you for your nice comment.

The van body is finished I am going to use as a trackside store or maybe even the goods shed on my layout.

I do understand what you mean about finished so I'm sure you'd like to see one that is;

The drawing was photocopied from an old MRN magazine and made in the same way as the van body, this time the roof is made from cereal packet card. The wheels are Slaters and the odds and ends from ABS. To add some avoirdupois there are a couple of lead fishing weights glued to the underside.

Another reason for making models in this way is that they look as though they've been used, odd gaps in the planking, the doors no longer fit quite right etc.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Dear Richard,

Many thanks for your kind comments.

I found one of ERG's orginal 'kits' you could buy either the drawing already stuck to card or just the drawing as this one is.



I think its more difficult to get the undercarriage parts now but as most of the short wagons and vans were made to standard RCH designs a Cooper Craft undercarriage could be used or altered to suit a particular length.

Jim
 

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Excellent work, I like working in card as it's cheap and I can afford to get it wrong!

Regards
 

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*** I've not tried.... it but as an option to shellac... I wonder how the paint on preparation that is made for painting on rotting wood to preserve it might go - Its thin and absorbs readily and it certainly adds hugely to the strength of otherwise very soft rotten timber...

Richard

QUOTE (alastairq @ 18 Feb 2009, 04:14) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>just how much does shellac cost these days?

I s there any alternative card treatment [to the secretions of a strange beetle?}
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Dear Alistair and Richard

Alas I don't know the price I am still using some flakes I bought about 25 years ago, I bought it from Phillips in Coventry and asked for a 2 Lb you don't arf get a lot. I dissolve the flakes in meths for 24 hours and then use another jar of clean meths to clean the brush afterwards this eventually becomes the 'new' shellac, those polythene containers they sell in the Co-op are good to store it, screw top bottles get stuck up with it.

It's also sold as Button Polish and French Polish, a jar would last ages.

The reason for using is that the first coat soaks into the card and the next coat dissolves into the first and so on. A pal who worked at the Metro Cammell factory here in Brum said they made some coaches for Indonesian railways and they sent some blokes over to shellac the wooden floors all 50 coats of it, apparently it's the only stuff that will stop the timber being attacked by insects and going rotten.

As for an alternative I would think that a diluted varnish would do equally as well or even diluted PVA glue, I've used that to protect photos printed onto card and a good job it does to.

That wood protection stuff you mention Richard sounds ideal.

Jim
 
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