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Hello,

I gets really annoyed when see my freight cars empty. So I make losta strange loads for them. Here are some examples:



Pipe is a plastic "pipe" that i found somewhere in the house. Painted black and yellow (why? don't ask), sprayed with clear-coat and some lead glued inside (pic. below) for realistic weight.



And here we have a lovely 305 low-bed car with locomotive wheel load; wheels are from Thomas The Train that i pulled apart.



Well, this one is one of my favorites; it is a part of my project "trainz that never existed": the car was a stake car, but some of the stakes were broken so I cut off the rest, painted the bed in grey, and applied some decals (DB). The load is the printing head of a dot-matrix printer - yellow and orange paint by me.



This one is from a friend: he made the steel profiles from evergreen stripes and applied rust weathering.



And finally more piping, this time made of aluminum. Alu piping cut, 3 pieces glued together for the bottom layer, two more glued on top og them. The whole lot painted black and sprayed with clear-coat. And at last steel wire from a (computer) mouse used for wrapping.



If you like what you see; more will follow


Regards,

Cem.
 

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Some nice ideas there Cem - Keep 'em coming.

Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi,

Thanks a lot. I will keep the loads posted as they become available


One is on the way; "real rust" weathered iron load - will take one more week.

Regards,

Cem.
 

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QUOTE (cem tekin @ 11 Oct 2007, 09:31) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Well, this one is one of my favorites; it is a part of my project "trainz that never existed": the car was a stake car, but some of the stakes were broken so I cut off the rest, painted the bed in grey, and applied some decals (DB). The load is the printing head of a dot-matrix printer - yellow and orange paint by me.



This one is from a friend: he made the steel profiles from evergreen stripes and applied rust weathering.


Hello Cem,

These are 'the business' indeed...brilliant! I love the dot matrix printer one...it looks like some hillariously over-engineered (and therefore very German!) transformer or generator with heatsink at the bottom or something. The rusty steel looks highly realistic...congratulations on not being afraid of weathering your models...I would be quite woried about making them look dreadful, and so have resolved to perfect a technique on something old and then do my entire collection in one go so that it all looks consistent.

Have you weathered any locomotives?

Goedel
 

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QUOTE (goedel @ 11 Oct 2007, 20:56) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>...it looks like some hillariously over-engineered (and therefore very German!)...

HEY!!! You said "Piefke"!


 

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Goedel hi,

thanks for the comments. i have a series of ideas (will be put into practise soon) like the printer head. they probably will form a series (something like "techno-train" or "tech-transfer") in the "trainz that never existed" (ttne) project.

i don't usually weather my models because most of them are also part of my collection (many one-time-series and insiders). but recently i started to buy beat-up models for the sole purpose of "transforming" them into "something different".

i weathered only one loko so far; a GM F7 New Haven (first recoloured and converted to a TCDD -Turkish State Railways- loko, and weathered). i think weathering is a real fun job so i will do more.

here's how it looks like at the moment (unfinished):



and for comparison:



FYI; TCDD never had an F7 so this loko -again- is part of the TTNE project.

Regards,

Cem.

Note: the complete series of photos of conversion can be seen at here
 

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QUOTE (ME 26-06 @ 11 Oct 2007, 20:46) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>HEY!!! You said "Piefke"!

Hehe! Okay, how about the 'over-engineering that is found in all German-speaking countries'...
Actually when I think about it 'over-engineering' is really taking conventional engineering that just does a job and improving it to do the job in the most beautiful way possible, so it is a very impressive form of art! The engineering inside a BMW for example, however it looks on the outside, is definitely art. (and by an Old Master to!)

Hello again Cem, that diesel does look much better weathered, when stood by a clean one it suggests a toy and a model side by side! I have read your thread and it is remarkable how you did the transformation...it does indeed look like a TCDD locomotive of many years service.

Goedel
 

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I was only poking fun at you - Germans do know how to add some artificial complication to an otherwise easy task...
But we´re not always as mean as sometimes.

You did not by any chance mention BMW because some (most?) of their engines are manufactured in Austria?
 

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Hi to all,

As promised the topic continues ...

This time we have "literally" weathered iron load. I bought and cut the iron to the desired legth, washed to get rid of the grease that might keep them from rusting. Left the sticks out in the balcony, water sparying every other day. Within a week I got the desired effect - duration can be changed to your taste.

After the iron sticks are "weathered" I applied a few thick layers of clear-coat to stop rusting (this is important). Finally I glued 5 piece per layer with CA, bundled them with steel wire, and glued the wood blocks (made of balsa). Voila ...

This is as far as one can get in REALISM


Now I have an open freight car just like I love them: really heavy (about 200 grammes).

Regards,

Cem.











 

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QUOTE (cem tekin @ 17 Oct 2007, 09:37) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>This time we have "literally" weathered iron load. I bought and cut the iron to the desired legth, washed to get rid of the grease that might keep them from rusting. Left the sticks out in the balcony, water sparying every other day. Within a week I got the desired effect - duration can be changed to your taste.

After the iron sticks are "weathered" I applied a few thick layers of clear-coat to stop rusting (this is important).

That's exactly how the scrap steel loads on St Laurent have been produced, although they were left out for about a month.

The loads look great - look forward to seeing more examples.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Brian hi,

Thank you!

I surely will keep posting as more stuff becomes available. I have an interesting one for the following week; an -again- overengineered whatchamacallit! You'll like it.

Regards,

Cem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks Geoff,

These are really easy to make and they look good; all you need is a good idea and the rest is in your hands - by all means!

Regards,

Cem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi to all,

Still making ...


Here's the latest: what to do with a broken signal post ... well, you got it right; more loads!










Probably will continue ...

Cem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hi John,

Thanks for the praise.

Well, there's the wheel carrying low-bed, and now i got this one ... a few more and i'll have a complete "railway maintenance set"


Regards,

Cem.
 

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Hi

Great work on the loads. The steel just looks the part. Had a look at my printer and they just will not cut the mustard. I like the unusual loads like yours.

excellent work.

martin
 
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