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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I'm new to model railway building . Just a little shocked at the price of Woodland Senic roadbed and cork is about the same price. I need 122 mtr.
So I,m thinking of buying sheet cork and cut it myself.
I'm sure others have done it.
Question is after gluing down and Sanding the sides to Get the Bevel , does it look any good ? or is it better to pay the higher price ?

Thanks,
 

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Hi all,
I'm new to model railway building . Just a little shocked at the price of Woodland Senic roadbed and cork is about the same price. I need 122 mtr.
So I,m thinking of buying sheet cork and cut it myself.
I'm sure others have done it.
Question is after gluing down and Sanding the sides to Get the Bevel , does it look any good ? or is it better to pay the higher price ?

Thanks,
Hi Wiregauge Welcome to the Forum, I am sure someone will come along soon to help. I myself have used the Woodland Scenics underlay and for me personally it was the Best Answer mine was to raise my track 5mm and deaden the noise in a loft layout. Babs
 

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...So I'm thinking of buying sheet cork and cut it myself. Question is after gluing down and Sanding the sides to Get the Bevel , does it look any good ? or is it better to pay the higher price ?...
It's the way it was done in the past, before there were commercial products. Cut the bevelled edges using a Stanley knife, and when cutting straight sections using a clamped down straightedge as a guide, you flip the sheet between cuts so there's no waste.

Many excellent layouts were - and likely still are - built this way. It's all down to your craft skills, and it may take a little practice before you are 'cooking with gas'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's the way it was done in the past, before there were commercial products. Cut the bevelled edges using a Stanley knife, and when cutting straight sections using a clamped down straightedge as a guide, you flip the sheet between cuts so there's no waste.

Many excellent layouts were - and likely still are - built this way. It's all down to your craft skills, and it may take a little practice before you are 'cooking with gas'.
Thanks Babz and 34c. My skills are pretty good , so I will give it a go.😀
 

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A benefit I didn't mention is that if you are modelling a prototype location where the ballasting was unusual, then of course there's no constraint from working around pre-cut pieces. (I have a particular location in mind where the ballasting extended for a considerable distance between two diverging lines. Presumably the responsible track engineer had a reason for doing it that way...)

All the best with it, and do tell about your adventures.
 

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Might be too late to reply, but I used Midwest Products cork roadbed, which worked very well. The tip I found was to use a Dremel rotary tool with a sanding bit to smooth the angled edges. Worked well for me. If you're using your own cork this should also work well for you, I think. (disclaimer: I'm a newbie at this ;))
 
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