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In depth idiot
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I doubt there will be a shortage so why rush?

We have no way of knowing which will show to greatest advantage, until a fair number of owners have their purchases out of the box, on the rails and subjected to independent appraisal.

Bottom line is that both models are coming out of the same Chinese product development and manufacturing system that produces practically all our RTR OO, and I can write a list as long as my arm of the various defects that have troubled various of the brands participating to date. Causes as simple as inconsistently work hardened pick up wiper alloy, a bogie suspension spring over spec. for loading, marginally 'off-dimension' mechanical or electronic components, a slight assembly alignment error, colour matching incapability, packaging moulding a tad undersize causing damage in transit. Seen various examples drawn from that list for all of Accurascale, Bachmann, Dapol, Heljan, Hornby, Oxford Rail, Rapido; there are limitations in what is possible at the price we are prepared to pay. (Any current RTR manufacturer not listed means I have neither bought nor at least had a friend's purchase of that brand's product to have a good look at.)

Personally I would lean toward Accurascale based on the wagons I own, hoping that the shallower flange depth on the wagon wheels will be repeated on the locos. You never know, they might venture a dry side steamer of interest on some future day! (Reduction of the flange depth on RTR OO is something I feel is long overdue.)

Final thought, good chance that at least one model will quickly enough be discounted...
 

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In depth idiot
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...Most of my engines are Hornby which seems ok. It would good to see others doing well as it gives us all more choice .
The choice in RTR OO has expanded very significantly since Hornby ceased to be the the near sole supplier of steam locomotive models. When Bachmann launched their 'Blue Riband' range from the late 1990s, Hornby's tender drive, power bogie and traction tyre dependent range of 'old Margate stuff' was immediately mechanically outclassed, and they were forced into catch-up, achieved by transferring tooling and manufacture to China, where the proven technique for superior mechanisms used in American HO production was long established.

This move effectively opened the door to other parties, and now we are well past a dozen brands vying for a slice of the RTR OO pie, and most of it good product. So I am 'in' for a purchase of the Sonic ex-GCR A5 4-6-2T which occasionally showed up in the KX suburban area in the 1950s, and any maker that cares to offer any of B16, E4, J6, J17, J19, J67-69, K2, N1, N5, may lift the cash from my wallet. There's rolling stock too, plentiful opportunity...
 

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In depth idiot
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...providing the models run much better than they did 30 years ago...
This requires standards work to define the required 'better' of reliable running. This would have to be a DC test, because there was no provision for DCC on UK RTR in 1992.

My personal opinion, if it were possible to 'time travel' to perform a side by side comparison, by sampling and testing N samples new in 1992, and comparing to N samples from 2022, the latter would significantly outperform the 1992 product, simply because of the superior mechanism design's delivery of such as:
more reliable starting,
lower starting speed,
smoother and quieter running throughout the speed range.

Now, whether there's been sufficient improvement, there's another question.
 

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In depth idiot
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Take them out of the box, put on the track ... and then turn controller on and the model crawls from a start smoothly and very slowly without stuttering or finger prodding, it runs at mid speeds quietly with no “jockeying” along the rails...
That's my simple definition of RTR. Out of the box, straight on the track, it runs smoothly and quietly from dead slow. and up through the speed range, forward and reverse. (Before applying power I always check steam locos for potential fouling of the rods and correct as required, just too risky not to. Reckon on adjusting a third is my experience - note that most of my purchases have Walschaerts gear which is very vulnerable.)

Too many times (usually with steam locos) I have run them in on a rolling road at mid speed as instructed then on the track they either start and stutter a bit at slow speeds, or just jump from stand still to maybe 4-5 mph scale speed without the smooth accel between, also some sound like they have a mixture of brass and sandpaper gears installed ...
I doubt you are instructed to use a rolling road, but then I haven't bought every example of every RTR OO brand's products. Rolling roads are a snare and a delusion in my opinion, they don't properly exercise the mechanism in the way that running on rails does.

My best suggestion, redeploy the RR as a paperweight. Start running and assessing the mechanism on the rails: where it is going to have to work if it is to be of any practical use. (The real railway had a problem trying to assess steam traction on fixed test plant, they could not consistently achieve reliable correlation between performance on the rollers and on the rails; though not for the same reasons as in model form.)
...Ironically I have DMU and Steam locos in 2mm scale from Kato which are now over 20 years old which run beautifully and have done since day one.
Having worked extensively with Japanese engineers in my career from the 1970s onwards, this is a product of their national cultural attitude. I never encountered among them 'never mind the quality, feel the width' ; which is so disappointingly common among a large swathe of the UK population, and has done for so much of the UK's manufacturing reputation, as better educated and diligent competitors outperform us.
 

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In depth idiot
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... So anyone with any thoughts that may help me decide .
A look at this pair of side elevation views compiled from production samples, posted on RMweb, might swing it?
Click on the image in the link to enlarge.

The Accurascale for appearance by a country mile. Look at those wheels, rods, the crosshead; the slightly deeper cab sidesheet with the unequal height boot holes in the cab steps; the height match between loco and tender footplates. That's just at a glance as 'better/accurate' when compared to the Dapol. Detail on the firebox side is 'interesting': an upper row of five wash out plugs on Dapol, four on the Accurascale; were there variations of these fittings within the class? As for the flowerpot chimney on one, correctly parallel on the other...

OK, just manufacturer images of their samples, we're not to see the actual items in our grubby mitts until Q3/Q4 by my estimate. But, assuming that both are mechanically competent, I wouldn't look further than the Accurascale. Here's hoping they think about something from the dry side fairly soon.
 

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In depth idiot
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Just noticed from the Accurascale website that their model has a 3 pole motor! That is a deal killer right there for me. I cannot understand why they went that route, after all most manufacturers have been using 5 pole skew wound motors for years and more recently switching to coreless motors...
Your call, but seen from the perspective of near twenty years of very efficient three pole motors in Bachmann steam models in particular, it would not concern me at all. DCC irons out all variation in response such that you wouldn't know from on track performance what motor is inside. What might surprise is that it is five pole motors that tend to have the most non-linear response that requires straightening out - examples that bolt away on a whiff of current, or won't start moving on less than three quarters of nominal 12V. No difference in smoothness, noise, tractive grunt or longevity in operation, once decoder set up has been optimised.
 

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Now it appears that both are going to appear on sale in Q3 (2022). I don't have the slightest use for a Manor, but am interested to see how both shape up, just in case either brand embarks on a steam model I would like.

Accurascale particularly because it is their first steam model, and these present mechanism performance challenges absent from heavyweight centre motor with drive to both bogies D+E mechanisms based on long established technique for the North American market.

Dapol to see if they are climbing the steam mechanism learning curve, as both the D class (traction tyres) or GW Mogul (gear ratio) didn't have ideal mechanisms. (Whereas their D+E mechanisms I have seen (LMS 10000, NBL DE type 2/class 21) are right up to the mark.)

The Manor is a good test subject, as it is a small 4-6-0; and an example of exemplary mechanism performance from a small 4-6-0 is available from Hornby to provide a comparison in the form of their B12/3: which ices the cake by its very accurate dimensions and appearance, a real gem all around. (Fortunately the BR livery was lined black so Hornby's terrible BR steam loco green didn't sabotage this model.) That's the one to equal or beat.

Bottom line is that these models all come out of the same Chinese tooling and manufacturing system, so the competition between the brands is essentially about how their design input and specification for the model is executed: who has the best performing development and production management liaison?
 

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Accurascale vid, showing 'the reason why' of user optional parts around the cylinders and slide bars; which allow the model to be run on set track radii without these parts, or when fitted for best appearance, only on (probably much) larger radius curves. Good example of serious explanation rather than 'puffery' - other manufacturers might take note and follow this example.
 

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I am not planning a purchase of this particular item, but am very interested by the attention to making the best possible model, and value the quality of communication of the reasons for design choices. I am hopeful that this approach continues in future models: just considering steam loco subjects there is quite a list of notable loco classes built in significant numbers which saw long service, but never yet produced in RTR form; which are opportunities....

(Their wagon models that I have purchased are very fine, and I am very much looking forward to the BR mk1 57', BS, CL and S 'suburban' stock.)
 
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