Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 20 of 66 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,151 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can't find words of how to thank Richard for his MASTERswitch V2.

They arrived a long time ago but it was until today that I truely found time to test them.

I really do not care if it sounds advertisement or whatever you call it, let it be.

A truely magnificent gadget, idiot proof for the likes of me who has nil knowledge of electricity and it simply works wonders.

No hassel of soldering, no resistors, no diodes, no CDU units, just a simple switch and you control your solenoid motors easily. AC,DC or DCC whatever the source, it works.

I tried it with a 13V DC supply, used an old Hornby Point motor, along with the LED supplied for the control panel. Here are the results:





Once you get the grip of it seems like endless possibilities are in front of you , shall try to accuplate my Viessmann No: 4500 semaphore signals to it.

Once again thanks Richard for an outstanding product.

Baykal
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,854 Posts
Hi Ebaykal,

You beat me to it !!

I received a number of V2s this week and my planned project for this weekend is to do exactly as you have done i.e. put a dummy point motor assembly together. You seem to suggest that there is no soldering to do but the tags for attaching the feeds to the LEDs are on the bottom of the V2 and do have to be soldered.

One question though. Have you managed to fathom out how to identify which way round to wire the LED for either red or green ?? I am going to have 2 bicolour LEDs for each point (Red for Route Closed and Green for Route Open) but can't see any identification marks on the LED so guess it's a case of trial and error.

Well done.

Expat.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,201 Posts
Expat
I too tried a dummy run with V2's i got from Richard, and added an led i could be wrong but as the masterswitch has a resistor built in i kept the centre correct of course but wired either side as it came so to speak, it worked fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,151 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
QUOTE (Expat @ 27 Aug 2008, 20:19) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>You seem to suggest that there is no soldering to do but the tags for attaching the feeds to the LEDs are on the bottom of the V2 and do have to be soldered.

One question though. Have you managed to fathom out how to identify which way round to wire the LED for either red or green ?? I am going to have 2 bicolour LEDs for each point (Red for Route Closed and Green for Route Open) but can't see any identification marks on the LED so guess it's a case of trial and error.

Well done.

Expat.

Hi Expat,

..yes there is a itchy bitchy soldering
, even I could manage it.

Haven't checked that part out but seems trial and error.

By the way, your control panel, what is the material that you used to make it ? Plexiglass ? or for that matter, what is usually used ? Aluminium plates? Am about to dwell in that area now.

Baykal
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,854 Posts
QUOTE (ebaykal @ 28 Aug 2008, 11:48) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi Expat,

By the way, your control panel, what is the material that you used to make it ? Plexiglass ? or for that matter, what is usually used ? Aluminium plates? Am about to dwell in that area now.

Baykal

Yes I thought as much.

Re. My Control Panel - (See my gallery for pictures)

The box itself is polished solid beech and the top panel is 3mm white acrylic sheet.

I designed the track diagram using the graphics/drawing tools in MS Excel.

This was then printed onto A3 paper using a colour lazerjet printer. If you use an ordinary ink-jet printer you may find that the ink runs when you apply spray paint, depending on which paint you use, so best to do some tests first.

The rear side of the print was sprayed with 3 coats of white latex spray paint followed by 3 coats of clear polyurethane spray onto the front thus effectively laminating the paper between the 2 layers of paint. This produces a smooth durable surface which can be kept clean with a wipe over.

Once all paint was completely dry the diagram was then stuck down to the acrylic sheet using spray adhesive and any overhanging edges trimmed back.

Hope this is helpful,

Expat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,150 Posts
QUOTE (upnick @ 27 Aug 2008, 20:27) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Expat
I too tried a dummy run with V2's i got from Richard, and added an led i could be wrong but as the masterswitch has a resistor built in i kept the centre correct of course but wired either side as it came so to speak, it worked fine.

Maybe Richard will come in here at some stage & explain all ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
QUOTE (ebaykal @ 27 Aug 2008, 15:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>No hassel of soldering, no resistors, no diodes, no CDU units, just a simple switch and you control your solenoid motors easily. AC,DC or DCC whatever the source, it works.
Actually, it is a CDU in itself.
This was a concept I pioneered in MERG some 14 years ago with a kit known as the PMD1. Remarkably similar, going by the pictures, though I must admit it hadn't occurred to me that you could drive a couple of LEDs to indicate which way it was set. My take on this was that the switch position would show you this information. The main thing (as with Richard's) is that you can use a simple on/off low current switch for control, with all the high current being dealt with locally to the point motor itself.
More recent versions of the MERG kit include the option of an on-board 8A rated DPDT relay as well (so suitable for DCC frog poarity switching etc). However, as with all kits you do have to put it together yourself.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
774 Posts
Agree a great bit of kit and very simple to use. Thats a great way of testing before install never thought of that. You can use this in conjunction with Richards Master switch which is the Ultimate detector.

Dont want to steal topic but this is it.



m
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
QUOTE (TonyDaly @ 28 Aug 2008, 18:36) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Maybe Richard will come in here at some stage & explain all ?

***

Ebaykal... thanks for the kind words! Its nice to see one up and running in Turkey!

Tony.... There is indeed a resistor built in to the MS LED circuit... so no need to add one. Was that your question?

Expat - your turn now :)

Gordon... MS originally was quite simple - as you noted allowing a low current to be passed via a standard SPDT switch to control a large current device.

The thing we aimed for with MS V2 was to make it very easy to connect (lower users soldering need dramatically) and both lower any turn on surge compared to the original, and add memory and better control, so each has a small EPROM which makes this a little easier.

The MS Plus (another product) is similar to MS V2 but also has two DPDT relays on it, so can control multiple frogs and also create a solution for easy signalling, automation and similar.

Any MS can be controlled by anything that can create a contact or any form of command - we also do an opto isolation device to make its input control totaly universally safe for any form or polarity of hi/low voltage switching or control (inspired by a destructive DCC accessory decoder)

regards

Richard
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
QUOTE (Expat @ 28 Aug 2008, 03:19) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi Ebaykal,

You beat me to it !!

I received a number of V2s this week and my planned project for this weekend is to do exactly as you have done i.e. put a dummy point motor assembly together. You seem to suggest that there is no soldering to do but the tags for attaching the feeds to the LEDs are on the bottom of the V2 and do have to be soldered.

One question though. Have you managed to fathom out how to identify which way round to wire the LED for either red or green ?? I am going to have 2 bicolour LEDs for each point (Red for Route Closed and Green for Route Open) but can't see any identification marks on the LED so guess it's a case of trial and error.

Well done.

Expat.

Expat

The leads of the LED are 3 different lengths - note which goes to which pad and just test one and you have the answer for all of them :)

Richard
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,854 Posts
QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 28 Aug 2008, 19:38) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Expat

The leads of the LED are 3 different lengths - note which goes to which pad and just test one and you have the answer for all of them :)

Richard

Aaaaah. All is now revealed. Very clever.

Thanks Richard,

Trevor.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,201 Posts
Slight problem with the solonoids on the motor, i have Seep PM2 ones and am using a laptop power supply wired as below ...... i have the power supply set to 18v with a SPDT sprung centre switch, the solonoids get very hot after a short while, i cant write in paint the letters on the pm2 but they are wired A .... red C .... green B ... black. is this wrongly wired for the PM2 motors ? suggestion has been made that maybe it needed a higher voltage going in to the V2.
 

Attachments

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
QUOTE (upnick @ 29 Aug 2008, 03:35) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Slight problem with the solonoids on the motor, i have Seep PM2 ones and am using a laptop power supply wired as below ...... i have the power supply set to 18v with a SPDT sprung centre switch, the solonoids get very hot after a short while, i cant write in paint the letters on the pm2 but they are wired A .... red C .... green B ... black. is this wrongly wired for the PM2 motors ? suggestion has been made that maybe it needed a higher voltage going in to the V2.

***Upnick the schematic is basically correct but I cant say whether the actual wiring you've done is. There should be no heat generated at the coil if wired correctly and everything else OK .

If you recheck and it continues to get hot it is possible something is wrong, and we offer a fully goof proof warranty so no matter how that happened I am quite happy to send to you a new one no charge - just let me know off list if help is needed.

Regards

Richard
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,201 Posts
QUOTE (Richard Johnson @ 29 Aug 2008, 04:15) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>***Upnick the schematic is basically correct but I cant say whether the actual wiring you've done is. There should be no heat generated at the coil if wired correctly and everything else OK .

If you recheck and it continues to get hot it is possible something is wrong, and we offer a fully goof proof warranty so no matter how that happened I am quite happy to send to you a new one no charge - just let me know off list if help is needed.

Regards

Richard

Hi Richard,

I will check all the wrinig and try again, many thanks for you help let you know how i go on ......
Very happy with the V2 though
 

·
Retired...
Joined
·
106 Posts
The leads of the LED are 3 different lengths - note which goes to which pad and just test one and you have the answer for all of them :)

Expat
Go on to Maplins or similar web-site and look up the spec sheet for 3 leg bi-colour LEDs and it will ident by shap and length which leg is which. Also some 3 leg LEDs are DCC friendly by having a common anode - others are common cathode and fiddlier to wire for DCC.
Rob
 

·
Just another modeller
Joined
·
9,983 Posts
QUOTE (RAFHAAA96 @ 29 Aug 2008, 20:27) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The leads of the LED are 3 different lengths - note which goes to which pad and just test one and you have the answer for all of them :)

Expat
Go on to Maplins or similar web-site and look up the spec sheet for 3 leg bi-colour LEDs and it will ident by shap and length which leg is which. Also some 3 leg LEDs are DCC friendly by having a common anode - others are common cathode and fiddlier to wire for DCC.
Rob

***All the bi-colour LED I have made for me and supply to my clients are common positive/common anode.

Richard
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,854 Posts
Hi guys,

Well I did promise/threaten to make up my Masterswitch V2 test rig this week-end and here it is.

This set-up uses the Seep PM1 Point Motor and 2 No, Bi-colour LEDs which change colour depending on which way the point is set. The red is quite intense but I'm a bit disappointed at the green which is barely visible.

Circuit component Light Line Electrical wiring Electronic engineering

Circuit component Resistor Electronic engineering Line Electrical wiring

Any comment on that Richard ??.

The spare blue, orange & purple wiring terminals on the 6 way connection block will go to the DCC Bus and the point frog respectively.

All in all I think that's mission accomplished.

One thing that is bugging me though. Why do my photos always get reduced in size??

They are 640 x 480 as recommended.

Expat.
 

Attachments

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,844 Posts
QUOTE One thing that is bugging me though. Why do my photos always get reduced in size??

A worthwhile question. The reason is that you are uploading the images directly to the post as attachments. These appear in the post as thumbnails, hence the reduction. If you want the photos to appear in the post itself, you are back to having to upload the images somewhere on the internet and reference them via a URL but as a Plus member you can upload the images to a photo gallery in the Forum and fetch them from there. That's what I do. I think this is more flexible as you can use the photo again in the future in another post. In the case of illustrative photos such as the ones you have just posted, you are almost certainly going to use them again, as someone will ask a similar question.

I hope this helps.

David
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,844 Posts
QUOTE It does indeed David and I will now place photos in my album, before posting them into a topic.

Thanks very much.

You're welcome.

I should have added that you can see the attachment at its full size by clicking on it, but you all knew that didn't you


David
 
1 - 20 of 66 Posts
Top