Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,592 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I subscribe to a number of modelling and railway magazines. They are:
Model Railroader
British Railway Modelling
Model Rail
and as I always pickup a copy of Steam Railway I'll count that as well. These arn't the only publications I take
on a regular basis, but the only ones connected with railways.

Model Railroader surpasses it's excellent best with it's latest issue, and it's one issue I would recommend all
modellers. Picking out the articles from the front:
Workshop: build a point motor installation tool
Scenery: Making realistic tree's
Building a layout in 14 x 8 using Decorama's: a very intresting approach - size wise should appeal to British modellers
Bridge Basics: All you need to know about modelling Bridges
Narrow Gauge in the garage: More information apllicable to British Modellers
New Haven Cape Cod Branch: Features an intresting track plan in 12' x 20'
Having it all: Features a full blooded HO layout in 18' x 23' which is about the same size room I have, and intresting layout, without too much in the way of helixes or those difficult to follow multi decks.
DCC Corner: One for Gwent Rail here DCC corner using configuration variables or CV's to you and me.
There are lots of product reviews in cluding a new track cleaning car from JAM solutions.

When last did you see an intresting layout featured in one of our modelling magazines. It's either a Minorities
shunting plank, or a simple loop to fiddle yard. I think all of our modelling magazines need an injection of new thinking. Please feature some intresting layouts for a change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,592 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
lack of imagination I believe Dr. Watson ! I've made a decision about my layout, it's going to be modular.
Then I can change it about and even move house if I want to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,497 Posts
I think Dennis is a little harsh in saying there is little change in British layout design over the last thirty years. I returned to railway modelling two years ago after a break of some forty years. I found a much wider range of layouts in both design and execution than I'd been aware of when I was last modelling. In particular I think there is a shift to modelling actual locations, particularly in N gauge, or going for the town/urban area which was mostly ignored in the past.

And people seem more willing to encourage a wider range of layouts too - or is it that there is more ready-to-run equipment now available? I have Triang and Hornby catalogues going back to the 1960s - they are a great deal thinner than todays!
Regards,
John Webb
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
I reckon Model Railroader is probably the best model rail mag. Problem is that it is only American modelling that is covered. As I felt that RM was getting a bit crap I recently gave Model Rail a try and found it a bit lacking too, mainly diesels. It also had far less adds than RM. I find Continental Modeller is the most interesting read out of the British ones.

Dennis, space limitations really do limit your options considerably. Even with my new garage layout I am limited to 2.5 by 4 metres which is a lot more than most people in the UK will have and I find my options pretty limited.

MMAD, I like the idea of a modular layout too. You can the store extra bits and interchange them for variability. Probably a good idea for small layouts.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
QUOTE (Dennis David @ 1 Sep 2006, 09:35) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I understand. Please don't read my thread as an indictment of British modeling though which I think is top notch.
I didn't think that but with 00 which is the most popular in the UK, your options are pretty limited. I am really struggling with my garage one as I dont want an oval due to having to make drawbridge bits for access.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
QUOTE (Dennis David @ 1 Sep 2006, 10:28) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Go module. I've always wondered why I don't see more of it in the UK. Seems a perfect match for the type of modelling I see there which to me is often based on a "stage" or scene and the size of your trains.

If I ever get into HO which I want I'll just build a module.
Absolutely, it's an ideal way of having different features in a small space. It just requires a little more work at the building stage, but it's worth it as you can add and build new features when ever you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,275 Posts
Yes it sad for the poms. They never seem to progressed much beyond that GWR branch line that I think you got every other month in Railway Modeller in the sixties and seventies. AT least the yanks produced some interesting trackplans that were for the most part single track. Shades of Somerset and Dorset coming on


Ozzie21

QUOTE (Dennis David @ 1 Sep 2006, 01:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>If I had one criticism of British modeling it would be in layout design which doesn't seem to have evolved much in the last 30 years. You can only blame so much on lack of space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,275 Posts
I think one of the beat modular designs I saw in MR was Dave Barrows "Cat Mountain and Santa FE". Nice little 4'x2' modules all built in plywood. You could build one module, set it aside and start another and so on. Then assemble it all when it's finished for a running session. I built something similar a few years ago when I was short of space and the change i made was making the back scenes removable to make storage easier. It used to take an hour to errect the layout but I eventually made it 26' x13' with a center peninsula. Oh and it was Southern Pacific instead of Santa Fe.

Ozzie21

QUOTE (Dennis David @ 1 Sep 2006, 10:28) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Go module. I've always wondered why I don't see more of it in the UK. Seems a perfect match for the type of modelling I see there which to me is often based on a "stage" or scene and the size of your trains.

If I ever get into HO which I want I'll just build a module.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top