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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im more into building model boats than engines,but at e recent model engineering show i attended,I was asked by a friend`s son if I could build a model of the 10 wheeler steam loco used in the old TV show `Casey Jones`.
The `Cannonball Express`,looks like a Baldwin 10 wheeler loco,with the bulbous stack. I was wondering if anyone on here could advise me of where i could get plans for this type of engine,or give me any details of the class of loco.
On investigation,I now know that Casey Jones was actually John `Casey Jones` Luther,who was a real life enginner on I believe the Illinois railroad circa 1880.
Presumably then the `Cannonball` was based on a real train.
Many thanks to anyone who can help with info or availability of plans for a 4-6-0 loco of this type..
 

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Hi there

Welcome to the forum.
I believe the Baldwin drawings are in the Philadalphia state archives. or at least were presented to the state archives. weather the state ever bothered to catalouge them i frankly have no idea. There are a couple of baldwins that i wouldnt mind seeing the drawings for. they provided a mallet to china but thats another story.

i have just been doing a bit of searching on the web and found that it was no382 from the illinois central railroad.

Peter
 

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Also welcome to the forum.

The availability of plans and the best places to look may be affected by the scale you want to build the model to. Let us know what scale are you thinking of building in and we may be better placed to help you.

Regards,
John Webb
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE (alastairq @ 20 Sep 2008, 13:10) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Rivarossi [AHM] actually made models of this engine, both in HO and O gauge....

Thanks both for the leads...ill look into them.
Scale depends on the size of the original,but considering it will hopefully be a live steam working model,probably around 1/12 scale. I usually build model boats to that.
Many Thanks.
 

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I may have found something suitable for you. There is a small book "Greenley's Model Steam Locomotive Design and Specifications", revised by Ernest A Steel, and published in 1952 By Cassell & Co Ltd. This has a small group of drawings of a Gauge 1 American Pacific Loco with a coal-fired boiler, but possibly dating from around the 1920s or 30s in design, I've just realised!

Gauge 1 is 1.75inch gauge and a scale of 10mm to the foot - about 1/30th full size, so a bit smaller than your 1/12th scale. Can be run indoors but is also popular as a garden railway. There is a very active Gauge 1 Model Railway Association www.gaugeone.org who celebrated their 60th year in 2007.

The nearest British equivilent to 1/12 scale is the 5inch gauge with a scale of 1 and 1/16th inch to the foot. Going down you have 3.5inch gauge with models built at 3/4 inch to the foot. But at these sizes you are truely into model engineering and passenger hauling capabilities. Best bet is to seek out your local society of model engineers and chat with them about what you want to do. They may be able to give you sources of plans as well. The larger local libraries may also have books on model engineering - look around 625 in the Decimal Classification system at the end of books on full-size railways for the books on models.

There are also several monthly magazines on live steam modelling & engineering that might give you a lead.

Regards,
John Webb
 

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If it can be found, the author that went under the name of LBSC[r] produced a marvellous book on live steam, specifically about his design known as ''Titch''.

this is/was an 0-4-0 tank live steam, passenger hauling...but despite that, the author covered all concievable aspects of locomotive construction..I learnt all I know about Walschearts valve gear and how it works, from his description.
 

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Martin Evens is another well-known author in this area and of more recent vintage than "LBSC". But most are agreed that LBSC's locos were pretty good.

Regards,
John Webb
 

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Came across another book by 'L.B.S.C.' today - "The Live Steam Book" published in 1929, second edition published 1949 (!) and reprinted 1990 by TEE Publishing. (ISBN 0 905100 86 7) Aimed at those working mostly on 2.75 or 3.5 inch gauge live steam, it looks at all the separate parts of a steam loco - how to make them and put them together. It has no specific design but makes references in places to a number of his designs.

Regards,
John Webb
 

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QUOTE (alastairq @ 22 Sep 2008, 22:00) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>If it can be found, the author that went under the name of LBSC[r] produced a marvellous book on live steam, specifically about his design known as ''Titch''.

this is/was an 0-4-0 tank live steam, passenger hauling...but despite that, the author covered all concievable aspects of locomotive construction..I learnt all I know about Walschearts valve gear and how it works, from his description.

Visiting the St Alban's Model Engineering Society's annual exhibition this weekend, see what I came across!
A 'Tich' under construction - mounted on a special stand to aid construction:




And a completed one!

Regards,
John Webb
 

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Hi there,

I to have a partially completed 'Titch'. I cut and drilled everything so far with hand-tools. I used the hardback book about 'Titch' written by LBSC (London, Brighton & South Coast, I believe ) Very clear instructions on what to use, what tools to buy as you go and what castings you can buy ready cast.
The only castings I don't have are the cylinders, but I believe they are still obtainable. I might finish this one day... If I knew how to clean up the brazing that someone else did for me. The plates and buffer beams are dead square, but the brazing is a mess!

I usually concentrate on woodwork, but lately I have got myself into making smaller woodwork tools, like bradawls, metal try-squares and marking knives. Posh ones of course!


I hope to learn a bit from this forum and if I can assist anyone in the woodwork department I am only too happy to answer any ???'s . If I don't know, I probably know someone who does!

Thanks folks.

Jack-Titch
 
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