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I have just read the posting about the dangers of hobby drills and thought it would be good if we had a thread about our own modelling accidents so people can take note of the dangers involved (and have a good laugh!!)

I think my worst accident was also when i had a slitting disc explode. shards flew across the room and one finished impailed in my arm.

A stupid one was late at night and i couldnt sleep so i thought i would finish the solder joint under my layout. i was sitting there in my thin dressing gown and a piece of molten solder fell and landed in my lap. i wont go into the details but needless to say it was very uncomfortable for a few days!

I one evening (again late at night) i was cleaning my bob moore lining pen and somehow got an airbubble in the syringe. i didnt realise untill it broke loose brom the pen and blasted my face with cellulose thinners. this resulted in another quick trip to casualty! this was a real wakeup call for mee. it reminded mee that many fo the chemicals we take for granted in our hobby are extreamly dangerous. even the humble humbrol liquid poly is effectivly an industrial solvent and should be treated with care.

Peter
 

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There is always the modelling knife that slips and impales itself in your hand.

Or the broken ankle that you suffer when you try and save your hobby items as they are tumbling down the stairs with you.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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I suppose most of us have had more minor injuries when modelling than we care to think about, and as they are minor we tend to forget about them. Having said that I can think of three incidents which do stick in my mind, all of which have been painful. The first many years ago was when I was fitting a new mains cable to a transformer when my sister plugged it in and switched it on thinking it was her hair drier, there was a large bang and a flash and I came to on the other side of the room with a thumping head and clutching a seriously mangled screwdriver.

Then there was the incident when I got a Peco fishplate jammed behind a finger nail, this resulted in a trip to casualty and a very swollen finger for a few days.

Finally there was the "famous" baseboard cutting incident when the saw slipped across my thumb I once again went to casualty where I receved two stitches and still have the scar to prove it.

Oh happy days!

Regards
 

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Other than numerous cuts with modelling and stanley knifes my most common problem is supergluing my fingers together. I always start out with tweezers but as things get fiddly I always think I can control movement better with my fingers with invariably get covered with cyanoacrylate. Fortunately I have been able to release them my self, so far.


I know what you mean about the solder Peter, I have done a lot of soldering wearing shorts and you do have to watch how you are positioned when not working on a bench.
 

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Good footwear too is a recommended. Particularly with hammers, chisels power tools etc. and moving modules.
 

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Try this one for size


Chap cutting sheet sized board with circular saw.
You ready for this

He cut the sheet,placed the saw on the floor
what he failed to notice was that the safety guard on the saw blade had not moved back into position

As he let go of the saws handle,it proceeded to travel along the floor,up the inside of his right leg,using his trousers to perform this trick,and with a shout I would not wish to hear again
it imbedded into his manhood


The moral is also be very careful with power tools.

Happy modelling.

David
 
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