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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At Bobs suggestion I'm creating a new post. I have made my first go at scatch building over the last few weeks, using advice from Bob and others. I have sought to make a goods shed, based on a real one that existing on a scottish branch line, and looked like this.

I decided to get some practice first by building some metcalfe models which was quite straightforward for a novice like me. The shed is a work in progress.
I used mounting board from an art shop for the walls and roof, and the platform is an off cut from a metcalfe kit, and brick papers for some surfaced. I have scribed the walls, using Bobs method of an empty pen. I have used enamel paint for it , but in future will try acrylic for larger surfaces, as the paint tends to dry out the pot too much. Overall I would say it has been a challenge, but not too difficult and its best not to rush a job. I'll give more updates as I go


On the last picture you can see an error, with a gap between the tile sheets! I am hoping to disguise this at the weathering stage. You will notice that I have simplified the roof as well, to make it easier to construct.
K
 

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Couple of things keekster. I am repeating the bit below from my post on the Barchester thread in case you don't see it with regard to painting the guttering or any other flimsy bits.
"My fault here about the guttering keekster. I should have said earlier that I have several small sheets of card, including post cards and file cards that I paint in advance of cutting out so that any delicate bits, like the guttering is already coloured before scribing and folding. Sorry about that."
The other thing was that I only use the ball point for scribing on brick paper covered walls. All other panelling, of whatever type, I do with the craft knife. Even with very thin card it is quite easy to do with just a little practice. The big advantage of using the knife is that when you come to colour the panelling you have two different surfaces for the paint to go on. The smooth untouched surface and the rougher surface in the cut. This tends to give two different shades of colour and is more effective for definition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Interesting, suggestions Bob. I found the pen worked well, when pressed hard to create the impression of wood panelling and the paint sunk lower in the grooves. I see the point of using a knife, although the cut will be finer of course. I'll give it a go next time. I intend to highlight the grooves , by subtling weathering the shed all over (with 2 shades of brown), which will highlight the grooves a lot better. Above the shed entrance I intend to make it sooty black just like to original as seen above. But that will come last, details to go on first. Thanks for the tips by the way they have proved to be most useful.
 

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Well here goes… Here's my first real attempt at scratch building in cardboard. My through station at "Elmswood" needed an over bridge, booking hall and means of accessing the platforms. While it's still a very long way off being finished and in need of toning down with lots of weathering etc. I thought I'd share some "Stage work" pictures!





 

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Very nice. Do I see lighting in the early "roof off" shot?

David
 

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Looks good brian, much more ambitious than my first attempt. Just about finished mine now. Here it is prior to weathering the roof.


And here is after weathering

I used a cheap brown coloured chalk for the wals, lead pencil for the bit above the entrance, and tried some carrs powder on the roof, which I liked the least, because it was all or nothing! Just goes to show that cheap can work better. I have know sprayed it with cheap fixative to seal it.
 

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That looks great keekster and it's fairly obvious that you have picked up some good tips as to what does and doesn't work for you. It's a good start mate so keep going.
Same applies to you Brian and I think it's great that we have beginners in a craft that are willing to show their work on the forum.
 

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QUOTE Very nice. Do I see lighting in the early "roof off" shot?
dwb Yes LEDs ex Christmas tree decorations. Each cut from the original wiring loom and wired with a series 470 ohm resistor. All eventually to be feed from a continually powered 12v dc bus that runs all around the layout feeding buildings and colour light signals via relay contacts.

QUOTE Looks good brian, much more ambitious than my first attempt. Just about finished mine now. Here it is prior to weathering the roof.
keekster64 I like your double roof it looks really good. Perhaps we can see the building on the layout sometime?
 

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Something you might want to add keekster is this length of boarding down the join of the roof. It keeps leaves and other debris from collecting in the trough and makes a good roof joiner as in the photograph shown. You can also see the down pipe collector boxes which I believe I mentioned before.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
QUOTE (Brian @ 21 Oct 2006, 15:49) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>dwb Yes LEDs ex Christmas tree decorations. Each cut from the original wiring loom and wired with a series 470 ohm resistor. All eventually to be feed from a continually powered 12v dc bus that runs all around the layout feeding buildings and colour light signals via relay contacts.

keekster64 I like your double roof it looks really good. Perhaps we can see the building on the layout sometime?
Likely to be some time Brian, as I'm doing the main buildings first before starting on the layout.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
QUOTE (CeeDeeI @ 21 Oct 2006, 16:03) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Something you might want to add keekster is this length of boarding down the join of the roof. It keeps leaves and other debris from collecting in the trough and makes a good roof joiner as in the photograph shown. You can also see the down pipe collector boxes which I believe I mentioned before.

Forgot about the collector bob Bob, will have a go later. Quite like the roof as it is, have deliberately painted the lead trough prior to fitting the roof, as I suspect its how the original would have looked. Thanks for the comments though.
 

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I'm also impressed with both projects. I like the station Brian it's not something you could buy in a kit.
Inspiring is the word I was searching for.
 
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