Model Railway Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These photographs were taken a few months ago (10 June). Since then the layout has survived a bombardment of apples and other debris with no serious effects. A couple of points no longer make good contact between the switch blade and the stock rail, but that was expected and the addition of micro switches is planned.





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
Your Garden layout is looking super Mark looking forward to seeing more of it as time goes on.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,397 Posts
QUOTE (Dennis David @ 13 Sep 2006, 09:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Mark please excuse the silly question but why did you use a table instead of laying the track on the dirt? Is this typical? Most garden Layouts that I have visited in the States are placed directly on the ground with proper roadbed of course.
I suppose you can do that with large scale track but with 00/HO it would soon be submerged under the dirt and if it rained it would be under mud.
 

·
No Longer Active.
Joined
·
13,319 Posts
QUOTE (Dennis David @ 13 Sep 2006, 00:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Mark please excuse the silly question but why did you use a table instead of laying the track on the dirt? Is this typical? Most garden Layouts that I have visited in the States are placed directly on the ground with proper roadbed of course.

Especially with OO/HO it's a real benif to get the trackbed away from ground level - far less dirt/dust to contend with at a higher level, with all the problems that brings.

You can see that the main layout is in the outbuilding at "normal" baseboard height - would you place your baseboards directly on the floor ?

It is a lot easier to operate at the height it is - no bending down onto wet/damp grass, easier to see (especially the smaller gauges) and, of course, as we all get older, less bending down !

Most UK garden layouts in the smaller gauges I have seen are at a higher level (my LGB garden layout is at ground level - if I had the time/money I would re-landscape the entire garden & raise the trackbed up to around 2').

best regards
Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 13 Sep 2006, 07:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>You can see that the main layout is in the outbuilding at "normal" baseboard height - would you place your baseboards directly on the floor ?
Only the transformer is inside the shed. The layout height has been chosen to suit my two older children (7 and 9) and be out of reach of the youngest (11 months) for a couple of years! Mud splatter was also a factor. I gather that track needs to be at least 10" above ground level to avoid the worst of this. The space underneath the main part of the layout is also being used to store stuff (non rail related). The control point folds back under the layout and is then safe from rain without needing to be disconnected.

We have a collection of Metcalfe buildings which are taken indoors when not operating (or if operating in the rain). Operating in the rain is another reason for a higher layout --- you don't have to kneel on the wet ground when putting stock on the track.

My next task is to fit proper tunnel entrances. I am undecided on the best material to use for this --- current options are concrete or the spray on expanding foam.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
Mark,

As a matter of interest what track are you using and how has it stood up to the hot summer you have experienced this year?

I am thinking of doing something similar to provide a return loop. My railway room is in the garden but the summer heat we get here which will be 35 C plus in a month or two was a worrying factor albeit the area where I was thinking of putting the track is in the shade most of the day.

Finally what is the track bed? Is it roofing felt?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The track is Peco code 75 pinned down with Peco track pins. On hot days there has been some warping of the track despite adequate gaps. I probably haven't used enough pins to keep it straight in places. The track was easily pushed back into place with fingers. When I'm satisfied that the gaps really are adequate I will ballast it (must also remember to give some extra space for the wire droppers).

If your track is in the shade for most of the day, the track temperature may not be as hot as in many UK loft layouts.

The track bed is 9mm exterior grade ply topped with the cheapest grade of roofing felt.
 

·
No Longer Active.
Joined
·
13,319 Posts
QUOTE (Mark Thornton @ 13 Sep 2006, 09:04) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>My next task is to fit proper tunnel entrances. I am undecided on the best material to use for this --- current options are concrete or the spray on expanding foam.

The expanding foam will be fine as long as it is painted/protected - the UV in natural daylight will eventually attack it. Personally, I would go for the concrete.

Please keep us posted on the progress, be very interested to see how the code 75 stands up to the weather.

best regards
Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
Thanks Mark. With the amount of work I still need to do inside it is going to be a while before I make a hole in the wall and take track outside. I think I will probably put a couple of feet of track outside for the next few months and see what happens to it!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
No the track doesn't enter the shed, it is merely screwed to the side for support. It would be tedious going into the shed to retrieve derailed stock, there is just too much junk in there (typical shed). The top of the tunnel section just lifts off.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top