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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Is there any one out there with a Myford Model Lathe for sale? Must have screw cutting attachment, spare chucks etc etc. I am thinking of trying to build some gauge 1 or garden type live steam locos or 71/2 inch scale . Or converting FSR ported glow plug engines to generate electric power for CBCO or BOBO type Diesels
Thanks ADS
 

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Sadly Andrew I sold a ML super 7 about 3years ago. I do have some bits and bobs that I did not know of at the time of sale as the lathe was my dads. They are mainly books and I think reamers. The reamers are all imperial. None of the tools have been used. I have literally thousands of screws nuts washers and rivets available in Whitworth and BSF. If you are interested please contact me by email and I will give you a list of the bits that I have.I don't want a lot for them and the pleasure would be to know that they were being used.
 

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'Model Engineer', 'Old Glory' and a few other magazines carry both adverts for companies who deal in second-hand machine tools and Classified adverts for private sales/wants. It would be worth having a look at current copies of these.

By the way, my experience of lathes in the school workshops while doing an 'O' level in Engineering Workshop led me to prefer Boxford lathes as being better than Myford, but I have to add this was some forty+ years ago, so it may not be true today.

Have fun,
John Webb
 

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It is some while ago that I looked at lathes, but the advice I was given followed the following lines:
1. Is it clean but lightly oiled for protection?
2. Any sign of damage to the bed - the bit that the other bits slide up and down on?
3. Any slack in the bearings particularly the headstock spindle on which the chuck/faceplate is mounted?
4. Any noticeable backlash in the slide traversing screws - the toolholder especially?
5. Does the motor start and run reasonably quietly - after five minutes do the bearings remain reasonably cool?
6. If a gearbox rather than stepped pulleys or changable gears, does this run reasonably quietly in all gears - are the gear changes easy to make but with little slackness?
7. If fitted with a leadscrew is this clean? Does it rotate with little wobble - ie it isn't bent?

Best check is to have the opportunity to do a test turning - possibly around 1inch/25mm mild steel round bar about 6inches/150mm long. Place in the chuck and take a few light skims off 4 to 5inches (100/125mm) of the bar. Take out of the chuck and check the test piece with a good micrometer for consistant diameter along and around it. If the lathe cannot turn a simple piece like this with consistency there is something wrong.

Regards,
John Webb
 

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John,

I have been & had a look at a lathe & thanks to your tips escaped buying a worn example.

I doubt that mine will ever get enough use for this to matter but a local modelmaker has told me that some of the cheaper modern Far East lathes are not repairable & reconditionable in the way the old lathes are. He would be far more concerned about a slightly worn modern lathe than a slightly worn older one. Makes sense as I am sure bearings are only used where necessary in the cheaper products & thus wear in the non bearinged points will be difficult to repair.

Does this make sense?

Chris
 

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Sounds like it to me - I expect a modern lathe is built down to a price. If they use plain bearings which cannot be replaced when they wear it will eventually be a problem because it will adversely affect either the work you want to do or your ability to sell it off.

Best wishes for a successful hunt,
John Webb
 

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I've just picked up on this thread and would like to make a point about identifying exactly what you will need your lathe for. You say you want to make everything from O gauge to 71/2 inch. I dont think one lathe will cover that range, certainly an ML7 will be OK up to a small 5 inch gauge loco, anything bigger and you could struggle. Conversely a bigger lathe is not happy at the very small end of the spectrum. I am a model engineer and I have a Colchester Bantam, which handles most things I throw at it, but I am aware of its limitations. So, in a nutshell, you need to find out what you are going to mostly produce, and buy accordingly.
HTH
Phil
 

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Dont touch Chinese. You MIGHT get a good one, you are more likely not to. Try to get s/h Myford, Colchester, Boxford or Harrison. Dont go for ex-production machines, at it 24 hrs/day. Ex school, college, training school machines are good bets, and they are around if you keep your ear to the ground. Mine was ex - uni, 20 yrs old but hardly used.
Good luck
Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hi PhilH
Emco German any ides on quality?they are offering a 5 year warranty
on there professional range Worth considering?

Andrew S
 

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As far as I know Emco machines are fine, if pricey. One thing - most model engineering designs, such as Simplex, are years old and have Imperial dimensions, ie inches, fractions of inches and 'thous'. For an old timer like me, this is fine, this is how I was taught, but if you were taught metric measurement it could be very difficult. To convert all dimensions to metric will be a real pain. I'm not sure, but I think that Emco might make metric lathes only, ie metric pitch leadscrew, metric dials. A lathe such as an ML7 or the older Colchesters, Boxfords etc will almost certainly have imperial leadscrews and dials. Another thing to consider when thinking about making a model such as Simplex is that you also have to generate flat surfaces as well as round objects. So you either have a lot of filing to do or you have to find a means of milling metal. This either means a milling machine or buying a lathe such as the ML7 where attachments can be purchased to enable milling to be carried out. This will not necessarily be possible on some of the other lathes such as Colchester etc.
This might all sound if I'm trying to put you off of model engineering. Far from it, I'm just trying to ensure that you dont spend your money and then find you cant do what you want to do. It is horrendously expensive to set up - on top of the machine(s) you will need drills, drilling machine, taps and dies, nuts, bolts, rivets, heating apparatus for silver soldering or brazing, the list seems endless. However, if you can overcome this, its incredibly rewarding. Dont rush it -get the right one.
 

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Andrew
These sites might be of use, although obviously private sales are best. Exchange and Mart is another good place to find machine tools.

H&MG&M

Good luck
Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hi PhilH

Once again many thanks for the information it is highly valued. I was at a local firm today, which until last week did not know it existed. It has a large selection of various lathes milling machines and CNC equiped stuff. Mostly three phase and most in need of a good going over with wire wool and some light oil.
I must say I was put off by what appeared to be a lack of decent presentation, I realise that top spin is not the most important thing but the lack presentation must mean somthing?
I was unable to get at anything other than the front row of lathes which were about six or seven deep.
I was offered a Boxford CUD single phase for £500-00 but I could lift the saddle and there was lots of slop in the cross-slide handwheel. Over all all the stuff on display looked well used and tired. So it looks like it may take some time to fall onto a nice lathe. There was ex- college unimat v 10's with milling attachments @ £1200-00 but was unable to get at them. I have joined a model engineering club and they have a very well equiped tool room so large pieces should not pose a problem, like yourself Iam of the imperial measurement school so imperial rather than metric equipped will be the way I will go. Thanks again for the input Andrew S
 

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If your in the market for a small precision lathe have a look at the Proxxon

Chrons Eng

proxxon

I wish I could justify both the lathe and the milling machine. This machine has full screw cutting facilities. As with all this kit it's the extras that push it over the top.
 

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yes i think "a little tweaking" is right. the design has changed significantly over the years and many of the crap reviews were of the older machines. there are plenty of web sites out there that give details of the modifications. it really isnt that difficult and you can get a machine that is plenty accurate enough for model engineering. if you were going to make a replica of the harrison H3 chronometer then yes go for a better lathe but i think for steam engines they are perfectly adequate and about £400 cheaper than anything else out there. for a 3.5" loco i cant emagine the tolerence on even the cylinders being any tighter than -0+.2mm. i can get 0.01 tolerence on just about anything i wanted to turn if i was being really fussy. you have to ask what are you going to use it for? a myford with a rusty bed will be far worse than even one of the older chinese lathes.

Peter
 
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