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Hi Folks

I'm looking for a site or web page that explains the difference between model narrow gauge scales, ie. 009, HOe, OOn3, etc... I understand O, HO/OO, N, Z, etc, but am mightily confused on narrow gauge side of things

I returned to model building 12 months ago and would like to build a layout, due to lack of space narrow gauge would seem to fit the bill and give me the opportunity to build most of the rolling stock myself, any help gratefully recieved.

David
 

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like everything else in model railways, narrow gauge nomenclature [cough] is a compromise.

Start off with one's chosen scale/standard gauge symbol.

HO is 3.5 mm/foot, on 16.5mm gauge track...a scale ratio of 1/87.
OO is 4 mm/foot.....on 16.5mm track....a ratio of 1/72..or somesuch.
O is 7 mm/foot.....on 32mm gauge track.....scale ratio is 1/40something.
N is a tad over 2mm /foot, 9mm track
but there is also 2 mm scale as well...the TT at 3mm/foot, 12 mm gauge track....and so on

ok so far?

Now then...combine HO.[3.5mm scale, 1/87] with 9 mm [N gauge] track..and you get, I believe, HOe...or a track gauge of around 2 foot 6" or so.
HOm uses, I believe, 12mm gauge track [TT gauge]..to deliver metre gauge.
HOn3 is popular in the 'States...3.5mm scale, 10.5mm gauge track, for 3 foot gauge prototypes...(Denver & Rio Grande?]

For 4 mm scale, we have what used to be OOn2, for 2' 3" gauge, on N gauge track......on 12mm [TT] track it used to be OOn3...[3 foot gauge].

Then for 7 mm scale, we have On2, On3.....the former using 14mm gauge track [Roy Link products?]...then there's On2.5....which used OO/HO gauge track, with 7mm scale.

not forgetting the past years, with the likes of GEM producing wonderful welsh locos...to a scale of around 5.5mm foot...

BEMO stuff is HOm.

then there's Nn3..ie Nscale, on Zgauge track..tiny.

my advice would be, pick a scale/gauge ratio that is the largest you have room for.
never mind the names........a good starter to pick a scale is, to find out who makes figures and vehicles in a scale[ratio] that appeals to you.
then find a proprietary track gauge that gives you approximately teh prototype gauge you want, for that scale.

people, and lorries are hard to adapt to other scales.....locos, stock and track can cross-dress anytime.
 

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So that's clear is it Wingnut?


QUOTE (alastairq)people, and lorries are hard to adapt to other scales.....locos, stock and track can cross-dress anytime.
This is an excellent point, perhaps you should think about the other aspects of your layout such as scenery, operational scope and vehicles etc. and deduce the most suitable gauge from that.

Welcome to the forum by the way, and good luck with the scratchbuilding which I think can be challenging but very rewarding if one perseveres.
 

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Alastair is correct the really confusing thing is the mix of model gauge versus protoype gauge, I've re stated some of his to make the differences clearer.

N6.5 - N scale metre gauge using Z track.

OO9 - OO on 9mm track
HOe - HO on 9mm track - 750mm gauge prototypes.
OOn3 - OO on 3 foot gauge (12mm track )
HOm - HO on metre gauge - 12mm track,

O6.5 - O scale on 6.5 mm track, 10 1/4inch or 12 inch gauge prototypes ( models of miniature railways)
O9 - O scale on 9 mm track, 15 inch gauge prototypes.
O2 or O14 - O scale on 2ft or 14 mm track, (1ft 11 1/2 inch gauge prototypes).
On30 - US 1/48th O scale on 30 inch gauge (16.5mm OO/HO track)
O16.5 - British O scale on 16.5mm OO/HO track - (1/43 scale representing 2ft 3inch gauge).
On3 - US 1/48th O scale on 3 foot gauge (19mm track)

Gn15 - g scale on 16.5 mm track, 15 inch gauge prototypes.
SM32 - Sixteen Millimetre scale on 32 mm track.
G - 1/26, 1/24, 1/22or 1/20.3 on 45mm track
 

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Hi Again Folks,

Thank you for the replies, everything is a lot clearer now... I think I will stick to the HOe & 009 as they seem to be compatible with each other and there is a large number of kits available, also my space is limited to max 2' x 3'. Also I live in Rep of Ireland and HO/OO accessories will no doubt be more easily obtained than other scales. BTW when i mentioned building most of the rolling stock, I meant from kit form rather than scratch built. I think this will take the form of a working diorama rather than a full scale working layout with the scene as a whole taking priority...i remember many years ago attending an exhibition near Milton Keynes, when i lived in the UK, and being amazed by a simple long curve of single track leading into a station, every few minutes a train would appear from the tunnel and roll lazily into the station where it would sit for another few minutes before it rolled out again the way it had come...the anticipation was almost tangible, attention to the scenic detail was fabulous, i believe it was around 12-15' long in total...
One further question if I may, if i keep to shorter rolling stock, what would be the tightest radius bend i could get away with behind the scenes?

Thanx again to all those that answered my post, it is this sort of help which is invaluable to people new or returning to this or any hobby, now if any one needs to know anything about bog snorkelling fire away


David
 

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QUOTE (Wingnut @ 14 Nov 2007, 20:27) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>One further question if I may, if i keep to shorter rolling stock, what would be the tightest radius bend i could get away with behind the scenes?

Thanx again to all those that answered my post, it is this sort of help which is invaluable to people new or returning to this or any hobby, now if any one needs to know anything about bog snorkelling fire away


David

Hi - In my experience its usually the locos wheelbase which is the major factor in the minimum radius of track. A fairly safe bet is 6" radius but with a short wheelbase loco, skip/slate wagons, bogie coaches or longer 4 wheel wagons that have a coupling that swivels slightly (Egger-Bahn) you should be ok with 4" radius. Especially if you use Paul Windle couplings which have a particularly large loop to allow very tight radius curves to be negotiated.

David Y
 
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