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Has any one here got Fulgurex style motors controlled via DCC? I gather it is not quite as straight forward as solenoids because of the continuous current. I know that you can buy a "Hare" control for a "Tortoise". Visit C&L Finescale. Purveyors of Tortoise and Hare. for details, but the size of that hare would feed a family for a week!

David
 

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DT
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Tortoise is expensive if you add on the Hare DCC controller. £11 for the Tortoise and £22 for the Hare.

Fulgurex slow action Point Motor is £9.50, but to make it work with DCC you need a LA010 Two wire point motor adaptor that costs another £8.50 per point. It all ads up.

I'm ordering some Tillig items for testing so I've added their point motor to see if it works well. It costs £8 and looks like it is DCC compatible and has outputs for panel and signal LEDs as well as frog switching:

It has a positive action and holds the point blades in place as the Tillig points do not have a spring. The other makes above also require you to remove the spring in the Peco points to prevent short-circuits as the point could flip over before the proper electrical contacts have been made for the track current.

I'm picking up a bunch of Tillig points and track in HO/OO and HOe to test too so I'll show you what that looks like next week.
 

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>The other makes above also require you to remove the spring in the Peco points
I was thinking that might be necessary. At least the points I have don't have those little springy slider contacts underneath.

David
 

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Paul Hamilton aka "Lancashire Fusilier"
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In terms of panel control with indication I had the idea and plan for my panel (I haven't implemented it yet) that what I wanted was an easy way to activate the points and an easy way to visually know what route the points were set to.

Having considered the method of a toggle and LEDs to indicate route I thought that a passing contact illuminated push button switch could be used on the panel that automatically cancel the other lighted switch when pressed thus the button itself is an indicator.

Just a funky idea I hope will work on my layout..
 

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The light in most illuminated push-button switches, whether a bulb or LED, is usually on a seperate circuit, so it should be possible to wire it up from the switch(es) on a point motor to give the indication required without having to hold a switch down. The main problem is that a push-button with built-in light is usually much more expensive than a simple push-button switch and separate LED, which is the route I've taken on my layout.
Regards,
John Webb
 

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Apologies, now a little bit out of synch, I missed the 'edit-window'!

Here is the promised Roco turnout picture



What is so admirable is that the solenoids are so very neatly and completely concealed beneath the track bed, yet need NO cutout in the baseboard. I find this principle very appealing, in permitting small positional mistakes to be easily corrected, without hacking any holes in wood or having to fill the mistakes in again. It can save much wasted labour time and encourages experimentation in arriving at the ideal, desired result.
 

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Yes, John, that is HO and I think it's great!

This next bit is about Arnold, therefore is N-Gauge, but the principles seem good and useful for any scale.

Although many will know this material inside out, there will be others who have never seen it before, so I continue to add to this informative thread.

Here is a scanned diagram of Arnold's End-Off solenoid wiring, which is built in to their turnouts.
The principle is that the remote electrical control switches no longer need to be momentary contact, as the power is automatically cutoff by the electrical switch in the turnout itself. This enables the still powered remote electric switch to fulfill other electrical functions as shown in the diagram following this one.



This diagram shows how the Arnold remote switch is directionally illuminated.
(Don't be concerned by the squiggly little 'thingy' just to the left of the solenoid case - it is only the mechanical linkage from the solenoid to the turnout.)


This diagram expands the previous one in showing how colour light signals can be included with the remote switch directional indicator.


I must confess that although I fully understand 'end-off' electrical switching, I am still confused as to how, at the same time, "current can continue to flow", illuminating the remote switches and colour light signals, without flipping the turnout back the way it was before the button was pressed!

While requiring a little more thought and work, Doug's suggestion that route indication may be better served by separate power circuitry, I find that a good deal easier to understand than Arnold's method. Having said that, there is no doubt that Arnold's system worked, so I guess I'd better concentrate my mind a little more!

I would just add that I always thought Arnold's track looked horrible, the turnouts looked even more horrible and the external, surface mounted solenoids added one more touch of horribleness! So I never bought any.
But the electrical principles appeared to be ingenious.
 

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QUOTE (Rail-Rider @ 30 May 2006, 13:00) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I must confess that although I fully understand 'end-off' electrical switching, I am still confused as to how, at the same time, "current can continue to flow", illuminating the remote switches and colour light signals, without flipping the turnout back the way it was before the button was pressed!

The way this system is wired, the only reason the turnout doesn't flip back must be because the total current taken by the lamp in the signal and the lamp in the operating switch is not sufficient to adequately energise the coil.
 

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It is SO nice that when any member on here asks for help, there are so many who are only too willing to advise. It is because of this, that I like coming here and seeing what is on here as well as advising when and where I can.
 

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The old 'H&M' (Hamnett & Morgan) solenoid point motors also had a built-in switch which could be connected to act in the same way as Arnold's 'End-off' switch. These are still often available at swap-meets and the like, although at a higher price than a new Peco motor. Robust (aluminium frame) and could be mounted above or below board without any accessory base needed. For underbaseboard mounting there was a extension crank which only needed a small (2mm) hole rather than a slot. Multiple holes in the cranks so you could select the best throw for your points. I've got some on the sidings on my layout and for the fiddle yard; working well despite their age.

Regards,
John Webb
 

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Hi all
We seem to have drifted well away from what Parksie was asking originally!
What he hasn't said is what style of track / pointwork he's going to use. I suspect that as this is his first layout then he's using Hornby or Peco Setrack?
So frog switching isn't an issue. Keeping point electric operation and indication design simple and easy for a novice to follow isn't easy.

For illumination of a Mimic Panel why not do as the real thing does? Use yellow LEDs in row to show which direction has been selected? Red / Green indications are really for signal aspect indication. I use this method on my mimic / control panel. I only use two LEDs per turnout direction and feed these via one wire from the motors output switches contacts. the "Normal" & "Reverse" connections on the motors switch are connected to two positive 12 v bus bars. the LEDs returns are connect to the appropriate supplies negative connection. See my web sites diagram for a drawing Point wiring & Indications Scroll to the bottom of the Point topic for indication wiring.

Now. Why cant I seem to be able to upload a diagram to the forum???
 

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I just fell over another slow acting turnout motor!
This one is a Hoffman from Aspenmodel
QUOTE Motor driven with slow throwtravel, reliable and robust, suitable for all scales. Pressure is maintained to keep the point in position, there is no need to use latching turnouts (like Peco). For analog operation with track polarity contacts and automatic shut-off. Even with simultaneous touching of right and left control buttons, there is no contact burning. With sliding contacts (instead of the previous impact contacts) By this arrangement, function and durability have been improved. With a minimum lifetime durability of 100,00 switch operations. Lenght: 2,75 inch Hight: 0,83 inch, width; 094 inch. Current draw: 0,05 Ampere. Throwtravel: 5/16", Throwtime: approximately 1 second.
€9.95
 
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