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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

At long last I have finally converted my loft so I can start work on my new layout. It took a bit longer than I expected, but I didn't want to rush anything.
I am wondering weather to plaster the wall or not, any thoughts?

Well here are the first shots.
The 220 Voyager is there to give an idea of size.











As you can see from the last photo, there are a lot of B&Q brackets in place. These are becoming costly as they range from 55p - £1 each, but do the job well. Can anybody suggest an alternative to these, or know where I am likely to find cheaper ones? There are 14 brackets in the last photo alone.

All of this was done as of 7 days ago, but I still have a lot more work to do, just run out of timber.
I have choosen to have a double deck layout on this specific area, so under the layout will be the storage yards so I dont keep having to remove them off the tracks to make way for something else, thus allows me more scenic "stuff" to be added later.

Any thoughts, oppinions & suggestions I will be happy to hear them.

Many thanks
 

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Hi
Progress is on going then

Your timber framing is very strong, is it 2" x 2" timber of larger?
I use 1" x 2" PSE narrow edge up to the underside of the baseboard top. All joints are very simple square cut butt joints with PVA woodworking glue applied before assembling the two section together with the aid of two suitable length 4mm wood screws into each joint to hold them.
Legs used to be 2" x 2" but now I tend to use CLS timber, sold really for stud wall construction but is ideal of layout legs, in a metric size of 38 x 68mm.
I have made my baseboard timbers on grid of no more than 15" square to ensure the 9mm ply top wont sag over time.
Once the ply has been glued and pinned down the whole structure becomes very rigid.
 

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Hi Breaston,

Before you get to far i would skim the bricks with a thin layer of plaster it will look better in the long run, for support on the underside of the frames lengths of wood glued and screwed will give plenty of strength.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
QUOTE (Flashbang @ 14 Sep 2008, 17:36) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi
Progress is on going then

Your timber framing is very strong, is it 2" x 2" timber of larger?
I use 1" x 2" PSE narrow edge up to the underside of the baseboard top. All joints are very simple square cut butt joints with PVA woodworking glue applied before assembling the two section together with the aid of two suitable length 4mm wood screws into each joint to hold them.
Legs used to be 2" x 2" but now I tend to use CLS timber, sold really for stud wall construction but is ideal of layout legs, in a metric size of 38 x 68mm.
I have made my baseboard timbers on grid of no more than 15" square to ensure the 9mm ply top wont sag over time.
Once the ply has been glued and pinned down the whole structure becomes very rigid.


Hi, Thanks for your help there! I never thought to use PVA glue, even though I bought a 1ltr tub of the stuff for the layout when I start to do scenic stuff (long way off I know).
At present, everything is 2x2 softwood. I like working with softwood as I find it easy to cut and isn't too heavy. Will look at the 1x2 next time I go down to the wood merchent as I need more wood to carry on constructing the frames. I'll certinly use the pva next time.
Many thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE (upnick @ 14 Sep 2008, 18:24) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi Breaston,

Before you get to far i would skim the bricks with a thin layer of plaster it will look better in the long run, for support on the underside of the frames lengths of wood glued and screwed will give plenty of strength.

Thanks. Can see the benifit to plastering it. Will need to get somebody in to do some "Pointing up" first. Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (Edwin @ 14 Sep 2008, 19:07) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>If you're still using brackets then Screwfix may be cheaper:

http://www.screwfix.com/search.do?action=s...9f&ts=15503

Thanks for the link! I never thought to try Screwfix. They appear to be the item I need, Will have to double check tomorrow with the ones I have in the loft as they are quite cheaper than B&Q.
Cheers
 

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QUOTE (Breaston @ 14 Sep 2008, 21:04) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Thanks. Can see the benifit to plastering it. Will need to get somebody in to do some "Pointing up" first. Cheers
Will probably be easier to dry line it using plasterboard on battens (you can always use the offcuts for scenery as Neil does) - otherwise you will always be getting dust falling off those bricks.

An alternative to plasterboard would be chipboard or ply - that way you will always have a decent surface for fixing things like shelves on.
 

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Hi again
If you really want to smooth off those walls, a very quick way is to use Plasterboard as stated. You don't even have to plaster skim it as its in the loft!
I would use 9.5mm thick plasterboard and hold it in place with large dobs of "Dry Wall Adhesive". You mix the adhesive to a very thick consistency and then apply some thirty or so (for an 8 x 4 sheet) thickish mounds onto the wall in the area of the sheet boarding and then press the plasterboard into these dobs. Suction holds the board in place as the adhesive dob dries. This is how most homes are constructed where a plasterboard finish is required on a rough under surface.
This site gives the method of working etc How to fix Plasterboard
 

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Hi All

It is quicker and easier to dilute the PVA and apply on the walls with a pressurised garden insecticide sprayer, instead of using a paint brush; Except for around electrical fittings which should be 'masked up' to prevent any moisture from entering and the PVA applied by brush.

Unless you plan to stand on the base boards 2 x 1 softwood timber will be sufficiently strong for the tops, glued and screwed together.

Method

What I would do is go to B&Q and get some under-laminate pulp board (Pack of 10 sheets) and some under laminate 3mm foam.

Cut the track bed to shape larger than the ballast line from the MDF board, and cutting holes for point motors. Fix in place onto the baseboard with PVA, cover with the 3mm plastic foam fixed in place with double sided sticky tape. Paint ballast colour. Fix track in place by mini drilling holes for the track pins and tapping pins home. Trim foam using the sleepers as a guide with a sharp curved scalpel blade (& handle) Touch in with track ballast colour paint (Matt household emulsion) Wire up and get everything working- when satisfied&#8230;

Cut road shapes from MDF and place in position followed by cutting the pulp board to shape along the track ballast line and road line and fit in place, don't glue in place. Fix layers of pulp board on top of each other using PVA and when dry shape to form the landscape. (I use a rotary wire brush and EYE PROTECTION AND MASK) when satisfied fix the roads and landscape together, but don't fix to the base board with glue. The concept is that the track is fixed to the base but the landscape is removable. This means that if a change of landscape is called for the section of landscape in question is lifted out and replaced with the new section or that the section is worked upon away from the main layout. Paint and texture in the normal way including ballasting etc

See my posting on landscaping methods for some illustrations and photos

John Pro
 
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