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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Sorry for the delay in responding, been offline for two weeks at short notice. I did want the pantographs to move, but had such a hard time getting the things to stay together I had to imbolise parts of them, which is a major bummer. The kit came with springs for the pans but no thread and to be honest I found the instructions to be a little confusing. Had I known the running around and messing I needed to do just for these kits I probably would have settled for the less good Hornby pantographs! But then they would look horrid. Experience for next time I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
The PMS (Pantograph Motor Standard) is built, waiting a touch up and transfers

As is the ATS (Auxiliary Trailer Standard)
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
The start of the next project - A 308 EMU from DC Kits.

Having sorted the parts out between coaches, I think!, work began on the BDTC (Not entirely sure what this actually stands for, but the DTC is Driving Trailer Composite (1st & standard))

The sides have had the door handles and grab handles fitted but I could get a good enough picture of them, so onward with the cab front.



Although this pic is a bit dark, that is the front end as the instructions have it, apart from the destination blind, I might add the handrails below the cab windows at a later date.

Next the roofs.



On the left is the roof as provided, and on the right is the roof as it needs to be. It has been cut to length, and had air vents fitted.

now the underframe.



Two of the equipment cabinets didn't fit as the instructions suggested and had to be moved along a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Well the BDTC is virtually built now, no pics though because of an issue with my computer (grrr!), anyway the seats have been installed and its got a lick of paint.

However the Con(n)ex South Central 319 is back on my workbench after its attempted test run. The motor in the PMS apparently doesn't like pointwork, so a new one is needed before the set can be fully utilised.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Whilst waiting for the new motor for my 319, work has continued on my 308 unit, still no pics though so I'll try and describe the ongoings.

The BDTC is virtually complete, applying the roof, a few touch ups and some transfers and its done. Work has now started on the Motor Brake Standard (MBS), with underframe and Roof sections started.

A Somefelt (?) pantograph (supplied as an extra to the kit) has been installled on the roof by drilling five holes in the flat roof section, air vents have also been added in two straight lines along the roof. The roof was again cut to length and four roof top insulators for the pantograph were also added.

The chassis fits together in much the same way as on the BDTC but with more brass elements, most of which fit where they are supposed to go. The motor does fit in the recess in the chassis and the bogie frame fits snugly around it. The hole for the non-motorised bogie securing pin needed drilling out a little, a minor quibble on an otherwise straight forward section of the kit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
An update:

Pictures:

No pics for a while as a rather expensive fault on my laptop means I can't upload the pics at the mo. Looks like the fault is somewhere in the AC jack on the motherboard, a new one would be £387 that I don't have, so I hope it is just a simple (!) solder job that a novice can do!!!!

The 319:

The 319 is still waiting its motor, so no progress there.

The 308:

The 308 is continuing with pictures being taken, even if I can't post them. So far the BDTC (Driving Trailer Composite), MBS (Motor Brake Standard) and TC (Trailer Composite) are built and awaiting final transfers, with work started on the final coach, the DTS (Driving Trailer Standard). All of the coaches use the same basic format so its become quite easy to see where things go, the only thing that changes is the underfloor equipment, the DTS has virtually none, whereas the MBS has quite a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
An update then, The motor for the 319 did arrive and was installed, it seems happy to run about for now and I hope it carries on for a while.

The 308 was built and due to things out of my control, there are few pictures of it being built, but it has been and was painted in a slightly fictional GMPTE livery (fictitional in that no 308 ever wore it!)

 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
The cab windows? Yeah I wasn't sure about them to be honest but having seen a 504 without it I wasn't convinced it would suit either and thus choose to have them.

I'm glad there were spare handles in the kit, they were driving me crazy at one point, but I did get into a routine with them in the end (just in time to do the last coach!). getting the body to fit right was challenging too, given that they are in three pieces and the chassis just didn't want to sit straight with the bogies and such attached (perhaps next time i should do that afterwards, but plasticard and elastic bands are wonderful things!

The other end (a better picture?):
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Time to dust off this thread........

Not much in the way of actual kit building done but I have started the task of fitting Kadees to my DMU fleet. It will cover classes 142, 153, 156, 158 and 220. I'm not doing my 170s or my 221 yet as they won't be needed immediately, anyway the first two units were done yesterday.







I was quite suprised at how easy it all was.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
A Bachmann 158 and Voyager have been onto the work bench for DCC fitting. The 158 uses one decoder, the process of fitting was as follows.....

(please bear in mind my soldering skills are next to none! Extra wire used was what was to hand and not representative of the decoder wire colours)

1. The lights in the motor vehicle were connected to the white and green wires (although I think I should have used yellow and green) on the 'driving cab' end of the resistors with the blue return wire connected to the non driving cab end of both of the resistors. The connections from the pick-ups to the light unit were take out and the connectors used later.


2. The motor was wired up (it was here that I think I should have used the yellow wire!), I found that the head lights were lit at the wrong end so the orange and grey wires were reversed (If I had thought about it I should have just unsoldered and swapped the yellow and white wires, although I suppose it makes no real difference in the long run).


3. The yellow (should have been white) and purple wires were extended so that they could pass through into the dummy car via the corridor connection, and soldered to the plug and socket (formerly used between chassis and body) from part one.


4. The pick-ups on the dummy car were removed and the connectors saved for connecting to the motor car. The lights were wired in a similar fashion to the motor coach. The wires were extended slightly and the connectors re-used.




5. With the soldering complete the wires from the Motor Coach were passed through the corridor connections of the dummy car before it was re-assembled.


I know there are other (possibly easier) ways to fit DCC to a 158, but this suits me fine. The headlights operate in direction of travel (or they are off), the tail lights are F1 and F2. With slight modification to the corridor connections (not really noticeable) the unit can negotiate second radius curves (and reverse curves) and can be put back in its box relatively easily. The only minor issue with this set up is that the head and tail lights at the same end can't be lit at the same time, but given the extra work that entails, I didn't consider it worthwhile.

The Voyager uses three decoders and was simple enough lighting wise, you don't NEED to remove the lighting circuits although it may be easier if you do! Basically the red wire becomes Blue (return) the black wire becomes white (or yellow) the capacitor that runs left to right is for the tail lights. Disconnect the capacitor from the existing feed (formerly black wire) and connect the tail lights to the decoder via the green (or purple) wire. Again I don't know if it the best way to do it, but it seemed logical to me and, most importantly, it works!
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
True, I just didn't want anyone getting too confused about what colour is what if they wanted to do the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
As this doesn't really fit in with my layout thread I'm gonna stick it here, although I don't really think its 'Work bench' material, Anyway, inspired by another thread (and possibly another forum) I have taken a paint brush to three 158s that I had 'laying around'. The idea stems from a photoshopped picture of a 158 in a version of Intercity Swallow livery as Virgin could have inhereted. Now I say it doesn't fit in because Virgin got rid of their 158s quite early, but my layout is based on the West Coast, so what if........

They did have and Intercity livery applied....




They got Virgin livery (and it was later debranded for use with another TOC)....




They got the new Virgin livery....




I really should get back to work on my layout!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I have decided to put lighting in my coaching stock, starting with my Lima Mk3 coaches, I hope to be able to install a simple (ish) system which will allow coaches to be rotated within a rake, but with power run from one or two DCC decoders installed in a TGS/Brake or Buffet coach. Storage is a key consideration too, the rakes must be relatively easy to store in boxes.

The seperate corridor connection moulding on the Lima mk3 is very useful for hiding the connectors I intend to use. Having decided the coaches should be able to be placed anywhere in the rake, and having three wires running down the train (two functions and a return), the simplest option was for six connections between the coaches, three on each side of the coupling, wired in a mirror image of each other. This allows for the coach to be rotated and still fit in with the electrics without being concerned about it's location within the rake.

Six holes were drilled in to the coach end and floor.....



The connectors are from Wilkinsons (although you can get them from other places), removed from the plastic cover and cut in half.....


The connectors are then lined up with the holes making sure the screws face the end of the coach and can be turned easily, before being secured in place.....



This modification requires the ends of the seating mould to be trimmed....



The two lower lugs on the corridor connection moulding need to be removed before the coach is re-assembled. I fitted Kadee #46 couplings in place of the existing couplings as they will interfere with the wires between the coaches. The re-assembled end should look something like this (I have left the roof off in this shot).....


The length of the wires between the coaches are being tested for length, too long and they'll drag along the ballast on corners, too short and the coaches will derail or it could split the wire. Two connected coaches will look something like this.....


And the interior something like this....


Still to come.....Decoder and pick up fitting and light fitting.
 

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A while later than intended, but here is the next stage of my 'upgrade', the pick ups. The coach used for this pick up is a TGs which has a handy space for the DCC decoder.

My chosen method of installation was by inserting brass pin point axles. To do this you will need to drill carefully into the plastic frame, the mould is just thick enough to hold the Gibson shouldered type.


A brass strip is carefully soldered to the pin point axle. There is very little room for error here, if the solder stands too far proud of the brass it will cause friction on the wheel. A wire was then soldered to the brass strip, another note is that the wire should be soldered horizontally so it has more 'play' when the bogie swings on corners. I removed part of the bogie frame here.


Lastly in this part, two holes are drilled throught the chassis, body floor and seat moulding, at the guards end. Be careful to avoid the wall in this part of the model. I have thought about the seated end of the coach for more pick ups, but at this time they have not been done.
 

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Oh blimey, three years old huh, well I guess I better apologise first for coming back to this thread after so long (I didn't really want to start a new thread for this), poor little spiders will have to move their cobwebs elsewhere.

I never did finish those Mk3s (grrr), but they are now lost to time and....actually I'm not sure where they went......anyway, having dusted off the workbench.......

New Project - 150/0 prototype.

I was contemplating something the the other week and the thought dropped into my head of how easy it would be to make one of the 150 prototypes, from a novice perspective anyway, doubtless there are differences only the experts know of, but for quick looks, it seemed pretty easy. All I needed was two 150 DMUs a really sharp cutting implement, some glue, wire, etc and a soldering iron. The basic plan was simple, cut the cabs off two of the vehicles and stick together, simple.....

Well not quite, I had a look at some pictures of the vehicles (there really aren't that many it seems) and I saw two potential problems. The first is that the prototypes, unlike the 150/1, have air powered cab doors (like the 150/2s), this is a problem which I think I have a solution to (without buying a pair of 150/2 bodies), but which will require some repainting on vehicles I would otherwise leave pretty much untouched and, tbh, I don't think many would notice if they weren't told. The second is that whilst the two car 150/1 has a toilet at one of the non-driving ends, the prototype centre cars do not.

I managed to acquire two Central Trains 150/1s. As both had the motor in the toilet vehicle, the first job was to replace one motor chassis with a dummy chassis, it's not exactly required, but as I started to convert, I felt it would make things easier later on. Naturally, because the lighting circuits on the driving car and dummy car are different, the cab interiors were changed over too, but this is straight forward as they are clip fit with a small amount of glue added by the factory.

The centre car itself was much more work. I kept with the plan to cut in half the bodies of the now motorised vehicle, but I decided that the least likely place for it to get noticed is at 1/3rd or 2/3rds down the body, basically, down the centre of the passenger doors, leaving only a trace of the 'cut n shut' over the roof (if done well). The toilet window issue was a bit of a headache at first, but then a thought struck me, I had, basically a spare vehicle full of 150 windows and a roof to match. So the plan was to carefully cut the window out and replace with a full size one. A roof section was also cut out of the spare chassis to replace the toilet tank access hatch in the roof. It's also worth remembering to remove the extra exhaust pipe at the 'fuel tank' end of the vehicle

The next issue is couplings. Unlike the Farish 'n' gauge 150 which has pick-ups on both vehicles, the Bachmann 'OO' model has conductive couplings, this is where having the driving cars as dummy vehicles came good. The motor chassis of the 150 is basically metal, but the very bottom is plastic and it is this plastic that holds the couplings in place. It also has the screw holes for securing the chassis to the body. So it was simply a job of removing the plastic chassis plate for the driving end, and putting the conductive coupler end in its place. It was wired in the opposite way to the original coupling at the other end so that the lights would automatically be correct for direction of travel (extra lengths of wire were needed to attach the coupling to the 'dummy car lighting tabs' at the other end of the circuit board).

It also turned out to be a good idea for the bogies, for which I now had two non-driving end motor car bogie frames, without the coupling mould that might have got in the way and the cab footsteps (both of which could have been removed if needed anyway).

I didn't think to take pictures whilst doing all this, hindsight and all that, but here are some 'after conversion' snaps.


The centre car chassis where the new coupling has been installed and the two chassis part (fail to) meet. The screw holes are used for, erm, securing the chassis to the body with screws.


The centre car waiting for it's bogies to be refitted (I still had some wiring to do at this point). You can, unfortunately, just make out the cut in the roof, at the far end, where the bodies meet, where the new roof section over the former toilet has been installed and where the new window section is. The dead give away for the last one is the grey square where a light was on the other body. I felt it would be easier to disguise any misaligned windows if they weren't right next to each other, so I replaced both windows, fortunately I don't think I did a bad job. A bit of filling, sanding and painting and you won't even notice.....


The three car unit all together (orientation note: the exhaust pipe on the centre car is at the end furthest from the unit's toilet).


With the lights working at this end....


...and this end (the 153 in the picture was used to test the electrics in the track as I discovered a fault).


The remaining 150 body parts, showing where cuts were made and parts robbed (not quite enough left to make a fictional 'bubble car').

So, it isn't a perfect likeness yet, and at some point I will probably go further with it, but for now it's good enough, now where did I put my paint brush....
 

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Interesting , if expensive way to go - though I know the Centro units have been on "special" at the boxsellers for ever

Presumably you now have a spare 150 drive chassis - which can be used to repower something else ? (I think someone's done a 156 that way , though I think the chassis block must have been lengthened
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
I do have a project in mind for the chassis, so it's not going to waste. A 156 does have a longer chassis, I'm not sure I'd want to use the 150 chassis for that, though the motor parts might suit it.
 
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