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Also from Rapido;
Even if the B-sets are to the same high standard as the LNER dynamometer (minus the electrical issues!), £170/pair (£85/each) is veeeery steep....! Maybe I'm just out of touch....
I can't quite see the point of a 44xx. BR commenced withdrawing them straight away and they were gone by 1955,, so unless one is modelling pre-nationalisation or the very first few years of BR, they are out of period. They had long gone by the halcyon BR steam years of the early 1960's.
Presumably, Rapido will be modelling the 44xx with its different sized wheels ?

I agree that £170 is a lot for a pair of coaches. Once OO coaches start topping the £100 boundary, you might as well go just a little bit further and get O Gauge versions which are significantly more detailed: Review of Lionheart B Set

And get an O gauge 45xx to haul them: Review of Lionheart 45xx

I have a Bachmann 45xx and Hornby B Set. They are nice, but the O gauge versions are way better!

As for a Y7, I can't see the point at all. Looks like we are scouring the dregs for something to manufacture.

A 40 does make sense, but I would have thought that Bachmann's relatively low key approach to them indicates that they probably aren't as popular as some might think. Personally, I find the 'whistling' of the prototype incredibly infuriating and annoying. Does my ears in!

Hornby's Coronation makes sense too. The loco has been part of their catalogue since the 1980's and given current calendar events, it makes total sense to apply a timely name.
 

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When a manufacturer looks at a particular model for manufacturer, I would think that the highest priority is to select prototypes which were found widely across the country and lasted a long enough period of time to be seen in a variety of liveries all the way through from pre-grouping, thru grouping and into BR.
BR standards, BR diesels and all the 'top link' express steam locos and rolling stock do well.

This is why obscure LNER 0-6-0's have never featured well as models because many of them were unique to particular areas, never travelled from those areas and were scrapped prior to or just after 1948. And of course, there were large numbers of different types, but many of them had small numbers of class members. Likewise with industrials: large number of different types, but small numbers in classes (but not all classes).

Manufacturers will always choose the maximum criteria that enables a model to appeal to the widest possible audience and therefore, the biggest possible market and ROI.

The problem we have now is that the market is saturated with all the 'low hanging fruit' and all that is left is items with limited areas and limited lives. Some of the 'new entrants' are taking those on, but I would contend that they are extremely risky business propositions.

If they sell, and evidently, some do, I would suggest that collectors are probably the main customers, because they will buy anything 'just to have the latest'. Real modellers will consider their chosen prototype which usually didn't encompass lots of obscure types.

The saturation is, I believe, what is driving Hornby to TT:150. It isn't about a philanthropic desire to support another scale. It is about creating a whole new unsaturated market to make and sell product for.
I actually think it is a considerable risk because there is currently next to no interest in TT:150 in British outline and there is no trade support for it. It is going take take a good many years for it to have any significant following, not least because it is only available from the manufacturer to the exclusion of the entire trade.
But of course, if it enables our manufacturers to survive, then that can only be a good thing.

These are my opinions of course, and I am sure there are people who know better than me!

My solution: Go to O gauge.
 
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