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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was persuaded by number one son (actually number two..but the other one is 33 years old, so wont mind!} to take a stroll around the NRM on Monday .

Amongst the delights of the wharehouse I found the layout of R Bryant.....''Inversneckie and Drambuie''

although stored and in bits, I was delighted by the whole ensemble.

Being in OOO gauge, built as a truly portable layout, I marvelled at its simplicity.

Incredibly, it makes N gauge look somewhat akin to Lionel Hi-rail in comparison.

I have no idea what 'code' the rail was..or even if it IS rail.....even the fact that the sleeper spacing was a bit ...spacious...didn't detract from the model.

but to me, its appeal didn't lie in the obvious 'watchmaker' engineering skills used to make it work...but in the fact that, looking at the layout as a whole, not one item stood out from the others.

Everything, from the track to the scenery to the stock to the detail, everything was on the same level of detail.

so everything blended in with everything else.

This is what I feel goes 'wrong' with so many layouts..especially mine.
some element or another stands out either as a 'super-detailed' masterpiece, or a 'straight from the box' mediocrity.

Usually, some obviously Peco trackwork, or 'obviously stuck straight on' Kadee coupler?
or a shiny new piece of highly detailed rolling stock......which outshines in 'authenticity', the field which sits behind it?

my point being, I suppose, why bother with a multi hundred pound loco, exact in detail to the Nth degree, if the hedges alongside the track it runs on, are, and look like, rubberised horsehair?

All these new items from the trade may well be 'jewels', but how are we mortals supposed to create the surroundings fit for them to be seen in....where they 'blend' in?
 

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DT
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Interesting ideas.

I always think of modelling as selective compromise. There will always be something out or wrong. If one has the finances, time and patience to do it 100% then good for you, but if you like most people you enjoy talking about and buying locos, the wagons, coaches, track and scenery will be less important.

How many people start a layout and don't get past the baseboard? How many people run their trains and then put them back in boxes instead of parking them in the engine sheds?

It's easy to run a loco around a loop or along a plank. Not too difficult to lay some track, but how many actually have the skill to build realistic scenery, and well at that? That's why we don't see it as often as we'd like.
 

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QUOTE why bother with a multi hundred pound loco, exact in detail to the Nth degree
I just love them in their own right as artefacts. I can't explain it much more than that. It may explain my preference for steam engines with outside valve gear over all other locomotive types.

I spent some time this evening just watching Hornby's "Windsor Lad", "Andrew McKosh" and Bachmann's 9F and "Kestrel" making circuits of my unballasted trackwork. They are all very satisfying models to own.

David
 

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I often find for example it's more difficult to make modern clean buildings look clean without looking straight from the box. Older more rustic scenery heavily weathered I find easier to do!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
'weathering' and 'aging' can hide a multitude of sins?

especially if that nice painted loco is found to be the wrong shade?

Personally I like the US of A's scheme for painting steam locos......black, black, and more......should I really say, very dark grey?
 

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As possibly the worlds worst when it comes to electricity and soldering I find I get far more pleasure out of the construction of scenry and buildings. I can lay and ballast track with no fear - as long as someone else wires the track for current delivery. (hint hint) It probably also explains why DCC is the way forward for me.

I too am not terribly fond of everything being pristine and squeaky clean, and as far as I am concerned even a black wash over fans grills and exhausts plus a little grey/brown mix on the underframes improves most diesel models dramatically. Let's face it they don't stay clean for long in the real world.

As the person behind the scenic remodelling of St Laurent I feel quite proud that I get asked for advice when out on the road, it means I must be doing something right.

Regards
 

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QUOTE (Doug @ 8 Aug 2007, 18:47) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>You're welcome to come and do some ballasting and scenic modelling here.

Bring some modules, and I'll wire them up for DCC


You're a very brave man Doug - you meight end up with BRITHO & myself (together with some samples) on your doorstep sometime - after all we are only a few hours from you !
 

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DT
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QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 8 Aug 2007, 23:55) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>You're a very brave man Doug - you meight end up with BRITHO & myself (together with some samples) on your doorstep sometime - after all we are only a few hours from you !

You are welcome any time.

There is a very nice Gite (B&B) just up the road from our place.
 

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QUOTE (Doug @ 9 Aug 2007, 11:20) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>You are welcome any time.

Thanks Doug that's a very tempting offer, I must be due some leave from work.

Regards
 

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QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 8 Aug 2007, 22:55) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>You're a very brave man Doug - you meight end up with BRITHO & myself (together with some samples) on your doorstep sometime - after all we are only a few hours from you !

We are in fact probaly nearer than any other UK based member.

Regards
 
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