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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if anyone out there can help.

I've promised to repair an old Triang Jinty for my grandson. Most of it is done, there's just one wire loose and I don't know where it goes.
It comes from the brass contacts that take power from the wheels, joins into some sort of capacitor or resistor (writing worn so can't make out exactly what it is) and then splits into 2.
One wire goes to a yellow, flat, component which is secured to the front of the chassis and the other (a white lead) is floating loose. This has a spade type connection on the end, but I can't see anywhere to plug it.
Logic tells me that this is live power into the motor. If this is true, where should it go?

I've looked for sites on the net that explain how to fix these old locos, but I can't find any. Maybe one of you will know of a link, or even a book that explains servicing & repairs, I fancy having a go at other such projects having got involved in this.

Am I mad


 

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memory is serving me here.......the lead with the 'terminal' on slips onto teh motor brush, in the kink where the brush spring bears, ie tween spring wire and brush.

so, one wire from teh pickups, to the motor, on one brush,,the other brush links to the other wheels...with a suppressor inbetween the two for radio interference.
 

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I confirm what alisterq says -the little tab goes behind one of the brushes so that the insulated arm of the brush spring pushes the brush against it. If the spring has lost its sleeving, then strip a bit of 0.5 to 1sq mm flex and use the 'sleeve' thus formed to insulate the spring.

Look out at exhibitions or swap-meets for "Triang Railways the first ten years" published by Rovex Scale Models in 1962 - this has useful information about maintaing the X04 motor fitted to the jinty and even has a reproduction of the service sheet for the 0-6-0 Jinty chassis.

It's possible that www.modelspares.com or www.scalespeed.co.uk who both deal in spare parts for Triang/Hornby locos may also sell the service sheets.

Regards,
John Webb
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys, I've followed your instructions and it moves!
Not well yet and very noisy, but I'm hoping that oiling and some cleaning of the motor will help.

Any other suggestions from our members on "how to" information will, I'm sure, be helpful.

 

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QUOTE that the insulated arm

gosh..thank you for the correction, and reminding me....I'd actually forgotten what really might not be obvious...especially if it is missing?

the insulating sleeve is vitally important...I am not sure which particular side brush it went to...I don't actually think it mattered.....I have dug out an XO4 powered chassis to look...but the motor is incomplete

the original sleeves seemed of quite rigid material, not prone to being 'crushed' by teh spring wire....I found plastic insulation had a habit of 'tearing due to heat and oily atmosphere, and the wire eventually wore through, to create the short circuit......maybe it was just me and my luck?

a drop of thin oil on that pad tween magnet and brass frame spacer is useful too?

or is that the wrong motor?
 

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QUOTE Not well yet and very noisy, but I'm hoping that oiling and some cleaning of the motor will help.

as I recall, with the XO4 motor, the position and the pressure of the brush spring, and teh position of the brushes themselves, was important to improving running.
too tight and they acted like brakes...too slack, and insufficient contact was made.

trial and error?

a scalpel knife end down each commutator slot? [ensure you dont have a raised edge on each commutator segment]

a polish of the commutator as well?

I dont know how modern electrical cleaner spray affects these motors..
I usually have a can of HAlfords electrical cleaner spray in my automotive kit, for my old cars.....but I haven't really tried it on train stuff.
 

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Hi Alistair

You asked: "I dont know how modern electrical cleaner spray affects these motors.. I usually have a can of Halfords electrical cleaner spray in my automotive kit, for my old cars.....but I haven't really tried it on train stuff".

My answer: Its often not good for the brushes... unless its totally residue free / pure isopropyl alcohol.

Restoring an X0-4 or similar loco to good running..... Here's how I do it.

(BTW - don't be tempted to disassemble the magnet from the frames - you'll lose some magnet strength if the steel frames ever leave the magnet)

First....

I usually strip out the brushes and give them a good soak in solvent to leach out the oil residue thats inevitably got into them over the years.

I then wash them off with soapy water, dip in meths for a while (1/2 hour) to get the last of the moisture out and air dry overnight.

I take the now brushless motor and cover it with detergent and give it a good cleaning with a stiff-ish paintbrush to get rid of the grime of ages.

at the same time I do the same to the rest of the chassis parts, making them perfectly clean.

I then use a tightly rolled bit of VERY fine wet and dry in each axle slot to polish it a bit (roll to a tight thin tube the size of the axle slot - the idea is to clean and poish not change the slot size, so by fine I mean finer than 600 grit. (Used wet)

back to the motor.

I reassemble the motor and with 12v of power on it (you want high revs), gently and carefully polish the commutator with a thin finger of 1000+ grit wet and dry paper glued to a thin strip of wood.

when its perfectly shiny and polished I clean the commutators with a sharpened toothpick and lubricate sparingly both ends. reassemble and lubricate worm with a wee bit of vaseline. Lubricate axles with a tiny drop of teflon based oil from the fishing tackle shop (Fishing reel oil is always excellent stuff, super stable, plastic safe and stays where its put, not like light machine oils which eventually get everywhere!)

99.9% of the time ithe loco will then run better than it ever did - the polishing in chassis and on commutator which removes any irregualrities was never done at original Mfr so axle guides will be smoother/pickup via axles better too... and the commutator will now be better balanced and sparking will be almost nil.

slow running should be better than ever before

Regards

Richard
 

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QUOTE (alastairq @ 24 Aug 2007, 20:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>the insulating sleeve is vitally important...I am not sure which particular side brush it went to...I don't actually think it mattered....

It went on the RH side (as you looked in the direction of travel) - loco would go in the opposite direction to "normal" if the wrong way round. However, this was useful for creating head on crashes in those pre-DCC schoolboy days !

(Yes BRITHO, I was a destructive b***** in those days.)
 

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QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 25 Aug 2007, 07:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>It went on the RH side (as you looked in the direction of travel) - loco would go in the opposite direction to "normal" if the wrong way round. However, this was useful for creating head on crashes in those pre-DCC schoolboy days !

(Yes BRITHO, I was a destructive b***** in those days.)

He he he... my cousin used to do that, and after he had smashed up his models, my aunt would give them to me; my dad made the mistake of giving me a tool set for my 4th birthday, and I took apart like anything with my screwdrivers, and (with some help from dad) put it back together again.

More often than not, all that was necessary to get an engine running was a couple of spare parts, and the engine was fine and dandy again. Hence my obsession with being able to buy spares for my models. You never know...


If a model was smashed beyond repair (my cousin was a bit pyromaniac...
), often I could put the wheels to good use, or use an engine´s motor to drive a windmill or so.
 

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QUOTE (alastairq @ 24 Aug 2007, 20:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>the original sleeves seemed of quite rigid material, not prone to being 'crushed' by the spring wire....

The sleeving may have been varnished woven glass-fibre or cotton material. PVC sleeving may eventually distort, so modern heat-shrink or silicon sleeving may be best.

Thanks to Richard for his excellent summary on refurbishing an X04 motor. If the magnet has lost power due to old age or less than careful dismantaling, there is a company selling modern replacement magnets. Haven't tried them myself, but South Pole Magnets (0845 8386803) may be of use - see Fitting new magnets in old locomotives in the Collectors' Forum.

Regards,
John Webb
 

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QUOTE Thanks to Richard for his excellent summary

hear hear!

I wonder how many old whitemetal bodyline locos are out there, that were designed to fit the Jinty chassis?

Richard's advice would be equally applicable?
 

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QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 25 Aug 2007, 06:50) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>It went on the RH side (as you looked in the direction of travel) - loco would go in the opposite direction to "normal" if the wrong way round. However, this was useful for creating head on crashes in those pre-DCC schoolboy days !

(Yes BRITHO, I was a destructive b***** in those days.)

What do you mean "those days"?

Regards
 

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QUOTE (alastairq @ 25 Aug 2007, 12:00) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I wonder how many old whitemetal bodyline locos are out there, that were designed to fit the Jinty chassis?
I have examples of J50's, N7's and what I think was meant to be a Pom-Pom, all long removed from clapped out Jinty 'meatgrinders' in favour of various of Bach's chassis. There were a dozen or more kits to take the Jinty or Wrenn 0-6-0 chassis. Others that I have owned included the Midland 'flatiron' 0-6-4 and J17.
 
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