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Given that on EBay a 40 year old model of the Blue Pullman can go for huge prices (200 pounds plus), and products by wren can go for more than a new model of the same type,

What model from the range available do you think will be regarded as a classic in 40 years time?

(I.e. we can use the excuse that 'this is an investment' to the Mrs to excuse 1 more model)
 

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40 years ago nobody thought that in time models of the period would become valuable and so they all got smashed up by the kids who played with them on the carpets at home. The very few that survived armagedon are collectable because they are few in number. Even so there were over 100,000 blue pullmans produced and even if 90% of these got mangled there are still 10000 or more circulating in servicable condition although fewer of course that are mint undamaged.

We today must remember this when we see the prices realised. Wrenn on the other hand seems to have caught everybody by surprise as these are relatively recent models. Stockists who I speak to who remember selling Wrenn in the 1980's never believed for one minute that the models would fetch £££!

Now as for todays models everybody is hoarding them in the hope that in 40 years time they will each be worth £1000!

And as such nobody is smashing them up!

So my tip would be to go for the models that are produced for the kids and ignored by adults. Anything in the Railroad range might be worth considering and anything Thomas the Tank Engine. That is if you are putting a 40 year perspective on it.

Happy modelling
Gary
 

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QUOTE (Gary @ 23 Nov 2007, 12:15) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>So my tip would be to go for the models that are produced for the kids and ignored by adults. Anything in the Railroad range might be worth considering and anything Thomas the Tank Engine. That is if you are putting a 40 year perspective on it.

Happy modelling
Gar

On this rare occasion I agree with Gary - whilst the "top end" models will probably keep their value & increase slowly, it will be the "bottom end" & unpopular models that will command the higher prices in 30/40 years to come.

But then, if we all hoard Thomas type models/toys & the market is flooded with them.................................. ?

Better hoard all of it then ! - who knows ?
 

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Adding to the debate, maybe you can consider trains from those companies not longer around.
One example from me, I lived in Leicester some years ago and saw Midland
Mainline trains (those really nice with Banbi! Not the later blue funny mosaic)
everyday. I didn't bother to buy a set of OO during that time. Now Midland Mainline
had gone forever. I looked for the Banbi sets and found very few of them in the
market. I saw one used set (original price 55 pounds) had been sold at 80 pounds in
Ebay with more than 15 bidders. It's getting worse. So wish I could have stocked one
5 years ago. Guess it will reach £££s after another couple of years :)
Another example is Scotrail. It has been bought by the First group and the Scottish
purple livery had gone forever.
 

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Gary could probably correct me on this one but I've noticed sets are rarely kept in mint condition.
 

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QUOTE (dbclass50 @ 23 Nov 2007, 13:38) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>it will be the "bottom end" & unpopular models that will command the higher prices in 30/40 years to come.

Which explains the high price of Rivarossi Royal Scots and LMS coaches.

Regards
 

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QUOTE (flygopher @ 17 Dec 2007, 20:41) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Adding to the debate, maybe you can consider trains from those companies not longer around.
One example from me, I lived in Leicester some years ago and saw Midland
Mainline trains (those really nice with Banbi! Not the later blue funny mosaic)
everyday. I didn't bother to buy a set of OO during that time. Now Midland Mainline
had gone forever. I looked for the Banbi sets and found very few of them in the
market. I saw one used set (original price 55 pounds) had been sold at 80 pounds in
Ebay with more than 15 bidders. It's getting worse. So wish I could have stocked one
5 years ago. Guess it will reach £££s after another couple of years :)
Another example is Scotrail. It has been bought by the First group and the Scottish
purple livery had gone forever.


That could be more to do with the fact that the company has gone and a new one is in place so the model manufacturers will no doubt focus their efforts on the new companies livery for a time, therefore anyone who actually wants to run Midland Mainline or Central Trains will no longer have the option of buying new. So the rise in prices could be due to runners buying them rather than prospective collectors.

I've noticed that the first examples of a given loco seem to command the highest prices, Holland Afrika Line and The White Knight are two examples, however there was a Holland Afrika Line listed on ebay as mint never out of box, on a buy it now for £65 and it didn't sell, I've seen this loco sell for 3 times that so maybe there is a seasonal effect on what prices the collectables can fetch.

What will make a good investment has to be something that is made in limited numbers, is a little different but has a demand that outstrips it's production run so there is a demand from the word go. The Bachmann collectors club models are perfect candidates especially the Caley Faiburn and 46441.
 
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