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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Evening all,

At the moment, I'm refurb'ing and detailing '00' Stanier Princess 'Lady Patricia', as produced some years ago by Hornby in BR express blue as 46210. Before I put her all back together, I intend to repaint her in LMS crimson lake, with her original designation as 6210.

I want to try and do a proper job with an airbrush, and to max up the detail I'd like to remove the factory finish paint job. Does anyone here have any experience with this, or know what sort of chemicals or processes are suitable? I'm worried that my ideas (turps sub, lighter fluid, abrasives) might damage the plastic.

All feedback welcomed!

Cheers,

Tom
 

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Just another modeller
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***Hello Tom

Yes, your current suggestions are probably all a little model unfriendly!

There are two products I do know are perfect for the job:

(1) It is called Eco Strip Its made in UK by Eco Solutions Ltd, WInscombe North Somerset. An excellent stripper that is also free of nasty chemicals.
(2) It is called Poly-S paint stripper and is made by Testors. Should be available from anyone who seriously stocks plastic kits and model paints. Not so environmentally friendly as Eco strip - contains a lot of glycol etc...

Both are very reasonable in cost and especially with the Eco strip, a little goes a long way. However if you are really wanting to hold the budget tight try these: Both have worked for me and are plastic safe - result depends a little on the brand and paint type.

(1) soak the bdy for 24 hours in any aggressive biodegradable type dishwashing liquid
(2) Ditto with methylated spirits

Regards

Richard

QUOTE (Tom Fernley @ 2 Jan 2009, 10:44) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Evening all,

At the moment, I'm refurb'ing and detailing '00' Stanier Princess 'Lady Patricia', as produced some years ago by Hornby in BR express blue as 46210. Before I put her all back together, I intend to repaint her in LMS crimson lake, with her original designation as 6210.

I want to try and do a proper job with an airbrush, and to max up the detail I'd like to remove the factory finish paint job. Does anyone here have any experience with this, or know what sort of chemicals or processes are suitable? I'm worried that my ideas (turps sub, lighter fluid, abrasives) might damage the plastic.

All feedback welcomed!

Cheers,

Tom
 

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QUOTE
(1) soak the body for 24 hours in any aggressive biodegradable type dishwashing liquid
QUOTE

Hi Tom,

Fairy powerspray works well on bodies put it ia a bag and spray all over seal the bag in the morning use an old toothbrush all over the body and rinse it off ....if further application is needed let it dry and repeat the process.
 

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Chief mouser
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Another suggestion, although not very eco friendly,

non synthetic brake fluid.

It's always worked for me.

Regards
 

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Hello Tom,

I use a product called "Modelstrip" 'available from good model shops. You spread a thin layer on the model, put it in a sealed plastic bag for 10 hours and the paint comes off quite easily, along with the help of the good old toothbrush.

Works for me every time;
Regards
Clive
 

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Hi Tom,

Have done a Princess (no jokes please BritHO) and didnt bother with striping the factory paint, the detail is quite well moulded that aslong as you follow the paint guide lines when spraying, and build up th coat in layers rather than just go for a one coat covers all approach, you will be fine. Another idea would be to give it a quick coat of primer/ undercoat in any light grey paint you may have left in your model box, this will help give the Crimson Lake something to key to

Good luck with your project, and would like to see some pics if you have any

Brian
CME Milldale
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Richard, Upnick, Dave, Clive, thanks very much for all the suggestions, they all sound promising. Really helpful, thank you.

I'll keep you posted on the refurb if you like.

Cheers,

Tom
 

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QUOTE (bro sewell @ 2 Jan 2009, 11:41) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Have done a Princess (no jokes please BritHO)

As if I'd do such a thing!


Regards
 

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Hi Tom,
Keep us posted how you go on with the loco body look forward to seeing it resprayed
 

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Hello. Im new today.
I collect Tin Plate Hornby 3 rail from the 50's. The striped and picture boxes. Its not the most collectable I know but I was left a large quantity some time back and decided to increase the collection. Its a reasonably cheap hobby. I buy most stuff from E-Bay and car boot sales. Anyway some of the Good boxed stuff I buy comes in job lots with stuff thats not so good. Im In the process of repainting some tin plate tanker wagons and an old die cast Loco. For paint stripping Im using good old caustic soda. You can get it from B&Q as Crystals that you add to water. Its great for paint removal but a little nasty to use. But my drains are always clean...LOL. Im not sure how it effects all plastics but some I know it doesnt touch. So maybe a bit of experimentation is in order.
 

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***The experimentation has been done by many modellers over many years...

Caustic soda is OK on metals but its results can also affect some of the metals used in modelling depending on time and concentration - there are better products with zero negative effect on the metals molecular structure such as Acetone or acrylic thinners. (Neutralisation ias also needed with any caustic/alkaline or acid solutions to prevent later problems).

Likewise with nylons etc caustic is OK at attacking the paint but goes too far.... it will leach some of the chemical and pigment content of styrene plastic and make it very brittle, as will some brake fluids and extremely strong household cleaners such as BAM (Bam is so strong it also leaches copper out of brass and effectively copper plates any whitemetal parts!)

Thats why commercially arketed strippers designed for the job exist - the options are low cost non aggressive stuff such as biodegradable detergents and meths which require very long/24 hour or so immersion times.... they don't hurt the base materials.

Richard

QUOTE (Thedeester1 @ 7 Jan 2009, 03:01) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hello. Im new today.
I collect Tin Plate Hornby 3 rail from the 50's. The striped and picture boxes. Its not the most collectable I know but I was left a large quantity some time back and decided to increase the collection. Its a reasonably cheap hobby. I buy most stuff from E-Bay and car boot sales. Anyway some of the Good boxed stuff I buy comes in job lots with stuff thats not so good. Im In the process of repainting some tin plate tanker wagons and an old die cast Loco. For paint stripping Im using good old caustic soda. You can get it from B&Q as Crystals that you add to water. Its great for paint removal but a little nasty to use. But my drains are always clean...LOL. Im not sure how it effects all plastics but some I know it doesnt touch. So maybe a bit of experimentation is in order.
 
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