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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,im moving on a little with my project and need some advice. I have the base ready to be built for the 00 layout, now im going to do the basic layout you get with the flying scotsman set the track mat set up,and was wondering about pasting tables as a way of fixing the base too, so that when i do extend,as it seems i can now iv looked closely at my attic space, I can get another pasting table to do this so the height is the same. My question is will the pasting table be ok for the job, taking into acount ill reinforce the legs and brace it too? Thanks.
 

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Hello, it seems like an awfull amount of money,time and effort you are trusting to these items that are usually resigned to displaying buffet food at your grandads retirement bash. I personally would avoid the upset before it happens and knock yourself up some baseboards with legs, straight ones and not the type that your name suggests!!
Good luck and enjoy yourself.
What I meant was that the time and effort you use to alter these tables you could make some new ones, doing this would ,as it has with me,improve your woodwork skills for future projects
 

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pasting table layouts are not new.......Chris Ellis did a series of articles inthe old, defunct''Scale Model Trains' mag......a shunting layout based on A.R.Walkley's pre war design....fitted within a paste table.....article called ''layout in a paste table!!''

Paste tables are a tad flimsy, however, they make a good lightweight ''instant'' surface.....

the Chris Ellis set-up actually turned the table inside -out........so that when folded, the layout was contained inside...re-movable buildings, etc....

the hinges were reversed, and I believe he inserted an extra layer of wood round the perimeter, not for strength, but to increase the height available when folded!

if using two tables, bolt together with carriage bolts and butterfly nuts for quick dismantling.......like I said..instant, and at around a fiver each, cheap.

what about a B&Q smooth-faced interior door?

but a couple of their own-brand workmates [I bought two at a tenner each] to stand it on.......all breaks down to easily-stored sections??

and....for a surface which can be affixed to the wood, what about an off-cut of building insulation sheet....the stuff with the foil on the outside...the foam is quite rigid enough to make a board on its own.......
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thats ok I didnt take it that way, there is plenty of time to decide which way I am going as im starting on the base hopefully on sunday
 

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As mentioned pasting tables are rather flimsy - I did a small N-Gauge many years ago using a flush plywood door which was quite sucessful apart from the noise ! - the door acted like a soundbox.

Personally I would use a more robust base with some closed cell foam to stop noise transmission down into the house.
 

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Because of the proximity between my house and the nearest timber yard I quite often re-cycle old furniture and house building project leftovers,(I've got some very wealthy neighbours who are allways having home improvements,cant really call them neighbours as most of them live in places like surrey etc...) so there is usually some quality materials being thrown out. I try to re-cycle most things for my projects. : example, properly dried out bark makes good rock face pieces.
 

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the post from frame69 reminds me of back in the 1960's as a young muddler, on advice from RM, I obtained a large pack of cork bark, for rock faces....considered state-of-the-art in those days!

used it on my first real model railway...a shelfer, narrow gauge OOn3, Triang TT track, jinty / airfix pug cross, and wagon underframes.........I RECENTLY DISCOVERED A CONVERTED COACH BODY I USED!.....................................mentioned layout before in these pages....the coach was an HO german old 4 wheeler....possibly Piko or similar, which were very cheap in those days....stripped of its running gear and fitted with a triang underframe.

most of the layout was recycled into something else...the cork was used on several subsequent TT layouts, and I still have a piece...

Incidentally, has anyone noticed those cheapo toy train packs for sale in seaside shops, etc?

some have german-type 4 wheel coaches in?

these make quite presentable freelance narrow gauge coaches in one's chosen scale gauge combo.....usually for sale around a coupla quids....
 

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QUOTE (alastairq @ 4 Feb 2009, 07:26) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>the post from frame69 reminds me of back in the 1960's as a young muddler, on advice from RM, I obtained a large pack of cork bark, for rock faces....considered state-of-the-art in those days!

used it on my first real model railway...a shelfer, narrow gauge OOn3, Triang TT track, jinty / airfix pug cross, and wagon underframes.........I RECENTLY DISCOVERED A CONVERTED COACH BODY I USED!.....................................mentioned layout before in these pages....the coach was an HO german old 4 wheeler....possibly Piko or similar, which were very cheap in those days....stripped of its running gear and fitted with a triang underframe.

most of the layout was recycled into something else...the cork was used on several subsequent TT layouts, and I still have a piece...

Incidentally, has anyone noticed those cheapo toy train packs for sale in seaside shops, etc?

some have german-type 4 wheel coaches in?

these make quite presentable freelance narrow gauge coaches in one's chosen scale gauge combo.....usually for sale around a coupla quids....
Bought these on holiday in Devon late last year...

....needed something to play with in the caravan
 

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I wouldve thought pasting tables were far too flimsy!
 

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depends what they're being used for......?

not a lot of weight involved, I suspect......and a board is only flimsy if someone sits on it.

As long as the base actually holds the track and scenery together, ie doesn't flex, [which a paste table doesn't], then it really doesn't matter what it's made of......given criteria for pin-holding, weight, sound absorbtion, etc.

Really, baseboards only have to be strong if they are going to take some abuse, ie get knocked about.

as for the weight they have to carry?

well, everybody on here seems to be commenting on how light these RTR locos are getting?

Paste tables themselves do take a lot of abuse, ie bashing with a big wet brush, etc....yet seem to remain fairly STABLE...which is I think what might be the nub of the matter here??

I WOULD advise that , if considering a paste table [as opposed to a box file, for example], then chose one whose top is made from plywood rather than hardboard??

[personally, I've stripped my old ply paste table...I never intend decorating again.....and will use the ply to ''sheath'' underneath, some 25mm foam insulation from Jewsons...in itself quite rigid, yet oh so light???

I shall be building only a series of smallish planks...shelf layouts, trying out various scales and gauges , even prototypes, for variety.....plus, easy to store and move when I shift abode...[ or the family have to clear out my possessions once I kark it.]
 

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Thanks for all the responses guys. My base is going to be made of slats of imitation wood flooring glued together to size, it actually worked out perfect as far as size goes, matching the template trak mat layout sheet that came in my set, then im reinforcing with 2x1 inch timber all round and sectioned in the middle to keep it firm, its this that im thinking of resting on the table or whatever is eventually used, as its going in a fixed place and not going to be moved around once its in place. Eventually i will be extended from it as i have found that there will be more room than i hoped,but id like to keep the trak mat design as i like the look of it, also it keeps it pretty simple for me to get more familiar with everything, as im a total starter in this, never done this before.
As for the top alastairq, I have a sheet of ply that i can fix on the top, which i think would be stable enough with some bracing of the legs too?
 

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sounds ok...the important thing about a baseboard, is to prevent sagging or movement. The track needs a fairly stable base to sit on....otherwisedistortion can occur[on a smal level, of course] which can result in unreliability of running.

scenery doesn't need such a supportive base, though....

bracing was once mooted as being needed at 1 foot intervals...if the ply is rigid enough, this can be stretched a bit......what you are after is a framework like an egg box, topped with your chosen surface.
that is basically the 'conventional' approach....a dozen ''how to'' books offer this idea.....

however, those of experience often look for alternatives...sometimes conventional baseboard-building can be intimidating for beginners...sometimes it's just too heavy or inconvenient....sometimes folk suggest ideas in order to promote discussion, or simply to get others started with modelling...ideas and stimulation?
 

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I have a friend who uses foam insulation for baseboards. He builds a ply "box" around the sides and a couple of supports underneath. Ive seen it "in action" and its very stable and ofcourse there is no need to lay track onto cork etc as the foam is naturally sound deadening.
Steve
 

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QUOTE (alastairq @ 4 Feb 2009, 17:46) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>charming F-unit...what scale do you think they are?
They look to be just a bit bigger than n and oo, small one was £1.99, big one £2.99 both with batteries
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Just curious, but how bad is the noise with out anything under the tracks. Im about half way with my base board and wondered how important this sound proofing is? Cheers.
 

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QUOTE the Chris Ellis set-up actually turned the table inside -out........so that when folded, the layout was contained inside

That is one of the best ideas ive heard. So simple yet very effective. I really like the walled area type look.

Im thinking I may need to join 2 paste tables together though to achieve a more "square" effect. Shouldnt be too difficult
 
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