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I'm currently building the large quarry terminal on my layout ('Jadis Aggregates' continuing the C. S. Lewis theme!) and decided to pave round the track in the terminal.





So I sprayed some 30 thou plasticard concrete grey having cut it to the correct size (7mm wide seems to work for between the rails). When this was dry I attempted to stick it down directly to the sleepers using poly cement. This doesn't seem to be the best solution - is there a better glue to use or a different method?

In the end it seems that 30 thou is too thick, so next time I'll try 20 thou. Trial and error seems to be an essential part of this hobby!

Thanks for any replies.
 

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Hi - I've found in the past that liquid poly's are not too good when using Peco flexy track - it may have something to do with the actual plastic they use.

Generally, I've found PVA left overnight is usually OK.

With paving between track I've found that its better to have the rail heads slightly proud of the paving.

Hope this helps.
 

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Hi .
Maybe I'm mean or poor. - but I would use cardboard - cheap and easy to use. I have never modelled in N gauge
but in OO I have used card on level crossings and porters crossings at station throats and have never had any problems . Its worth a try . Best of luck
A.J. Overton CME Goon Valley Railway !!!!
 

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QUOTE (Brian Considine @ 4 Aug 2008, 07:18) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>There must be something, but if you have to use the 10 thou, maybe paint it both sides ?
Don't Wills or Ratio make some card printed with paving look-alikkes?
Otherwise I think 10001 is right.
Regards,
Ben
 

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One of the things my mate uses with his kato track to give the effect of concrete/paving area is using some spare paving and cobblestone paper that comes with the metcalfe card kits and it does look effective as well and it already has the print on it if you go for the cobblestones design.

The other option you can have which is the way I did with the old layout is to used plaster of paris spread over the lines. The only thing you need to make sure is that the plaster doesn't interfere with the rails itself otherwise it can be a real pain to clean out from the inside of the rails so it doesn't de-rail your locos.
 

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QUOTE (10001 @ 4 Aug 2008, 09:44) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi .
Maybe I'm mean or poor. - but I would use cardboard - cheap and easy to use. I have never modelled in N gauge
but in OO I have used card on level crossings and porters crossings at station throats and have never had any problems . Its worth a try . Best of luck
A.J. Overton CME Goon Valley Railway !!!!

Hi - I think it depends on the location of the layout with cardboard, as if there is any dampness, ie cellar/garage /loft in the UK, it tends to absorb moisture from the air, try to expand and instead buckle upwards!
I know that the model railway housed in the tiny goods shed on the Lavender Line (near Lewes/Uckfield, East Sussex) had a severe problem with this when first constructed. I know that shellac etc used to be recommended to seal buildings etc but in my experience it was never very effective on track where even the slightest expansion would lift the loco wheels off the rail.

Have you tried black plastic card?

David Y
 

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I've been watching this thread with interest as I have an area on my planned N Gauge layout which I intend to pave and have been giving it some thought.

My current plan is to fill between the sleepers, but only up to the top of them, with epoxy filler and then use contact adhesive to fix down strips of 10 thou. Slaters platicard topped with strips of Slaters paving slab sheet between the rails, being careful to leave a gap between rails and paving for the wheel flanges to run through. A quick airbrushing to colour/weather the paving, with a dribble of very thin darker colour acrylic to pick out the joints, should finish the job. I'll use the same technique outside the rails but here the platicard/paving slab sandwich can run right up to the rails.

The main point here is that by filling between the sleepers first, you then have a solid, even base to glue the 10 thou. plasticard to and the paving slab card will go down smoothly on top of it. The double thickness comes up to just below the rail top on my Code 55 track.

At my level crossing I plan to use thin balsa wood, scored and stained to look like old weathered wood planks but, again, this will be on top of the epoxy filler between the sleepers.

That's my present plan anyway, but I'm always open to suggestions of a better way.

I've also tried the plaster of paris way before when I modelled in 00 and found the best way is to temporarily fit some 30 thou. plasticard strips to the inside face of each rail before infilling with PoP. (This was for 00 so obviously 20 thou would probably be about right for N Gauge).

I used double sided Sellotape to attach the plasticard. The strips can be removed once the PoP has solidified, but not competely set, to leave a nice clean groove for the wheel flanges to run in. I have usually mixed some black and brown powder paint with the PoP so that if an edge does break away, it doesn't show up as a glaring white patch. Once thoroughly dry the PoP can be scored into slabs and painted. This is quite a messy way of doing it though and I thought I would try a different method this time.

Happy modelliing,

Expat
 

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QUOTE (10001 @ 4 Aug 2008, 09:44) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Maybe I'm mean or poor. - but I would use cardboard - cheap and easy to use.

I have normally used card for this sort of work - topped off with Metcalfe slabs/cobbles/whatever. As long as the Metcalfe self adhesive has additional glue to aid adhesion I have never had any problems.

Regards
 
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