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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a reasonable investment in Peco code 100 trackwork but my current plans are tending towards having single / double slips and I most definitely prefer live frogs to dead. As far as I can tell, you can only get live frog slips in Finescale, so my question is how intermixable are the two codes? Would I get away with multiple "converter" fishplates (they do look expensive) or is that a track base height issue as well? I know that all my older (actually just about everything) stock will probably have flange problems but from comments re older motors (eg X04) and DCC, I may not be running these for much longer in any case.

So what's advisable / possible -
a) Large blocks with "mono code"
or
Short sections intercut with converters and code 75?
 

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DWB,

If you can consider the cost of a double slip or two without sweating then the peco code 100 to 75 converter is not a serious matter; as I recall you get abot eight links in a pack. You can set them live or isolating.

I use old code 100 for my MPD and mixed the two types in the goods yard. I couldn't just bin so many points.

Viewed from over two feet away, the two codes are in fact quite hard to tell apart and it is only the points that give the game away with curved code 100 looking the best.

Like you intend, Code 75 electro frog, is used on my layout for the main line and the staging where quality running really counts.

so: yards with code 100 / mainline with code 75. (Or its build you own time!)

IMHO

TVBG
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the comment.

>(Or its build you own time!)
I tried that a long long time ago not too successfully. Maybe a curved point was not the best place to start. I still have the rolling track gauge.

David
 

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david,

Your a braver man than me. Have never tried it. All that framing, laying, lifting and soldering, just to get one point. Have to admire the determination of those that can, in this area of our hobby.

TVBG
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was young and naive. A few years later, I built a kit car, it got through one MOT. A round trip to Leeds (~200 miles) only took 8 hours each way + 6 fan belts, two points resets, one battery recharge... I still shudder when I recall that weekend.
 

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What are code 100 points like compared to code 75 points? What are the issues?

I have code 100, but I'm thinking of getting some code 75 too for my new layout.

I'm a bit hacked off as when I was starting out in this hobby a few years back, I was badly advised by some guys in a shop in Blackpool.

Previously I had run Jouef track - not very good at all - getting dirty and oxidizing very quickly and loosing electrical contact with the locos.
 

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Hi.
The track will look much better if you decide on one rail height, and Code 75 looks much better than 100.
OK, you may have to do some re-wheeling, but you might get away with just easing the Back-to-back (distance between the inside of the wheel flanges). I'm in the middle of building a layout using code 75 and the only wheelsets that I have a problem with so far were some old Jackson bogie wheels on a 2-6-4T.
I have many Mainline/Dapol/Airfix/Bachman wagons with the original wheels. I always change any Lima though as these have very deep flanges.
Cheers.
Pete
 

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I know that using RTR track and points is the best way to start railway modelling. Such trackwork is also relatively cheap and can be taken up and re-used if required. However, I am not too happy about the suggestion that it is the only way to proceed and also the proposition that " if at first you don't succeed - give up". Most RTR points are made for HO rolling stock and the sleeper spacing and size are too small. Proper size sleepers, correctly spaced, and with SMP code 75 track looks so much better with OO.

Building soldered pointwork with copperclad sleepers, track gauges and proper track plans can be very satisfying and OO point kits are readily available. After the first two or three kit built points, you could be designing and building your own. Just give it a try, please.

Colombo
 

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DwB,

He, He.

Coloumbo,

agree with all you say: dont be too harsh though I did say 'admire' and 'determination' I just cant have everything.

LMS 10456,

Agree with all of that. If you have a clean slate.

If you have a large investment in code 100 what would you advise, was the question here.

Doug,

I dont think you can blame them. DCC companies were pushing the idea that any type of point was perfect for dcc including Peco code 100 insulfog. But when you finally saw the 'beginners layout' it was constructed with ROCO - Ha!

Once you have tried Code 75 electro frog you will see improvements in many areas, and you will never go back. Perhaps you could outline some of the things that you personally dislike about code 100 insufrog. And then we can all do a compare and contrast and not be accused of answering a problem that was never there.

TVBG
 

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DT
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All my points are large radius code 100 electrofrog. The track works fine. I was just wondering if the code 75 was in any way an improvement.

Looks has been mentioned, what else?

I have to get a whole lot more track for my next layout. It will have hidden staging so I could put all my code 100 down there. I also have separate areas of the layout, linked by a mainline. I could concentrate one type of rail in one area.
 

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Doug,

Agree: looks. The code 75 points certainly look better.

Smoother running:

Over a near identical staging yard with code 100 insulfrog and code 75 electrofrog.

1.trains made a distinct clump sound at every point.

2.trains thought they were on southern region third rail (sparks)

3.trains stalled a little bit too often over points

4.too much wiring

5. too much flashing of coaches with lights in

code 75 electro frog solved all these problems for me.

Just my humble opinion/observation

TVGB
 

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In the US you'll often find that different track heights are used in HO with mainline being mostly Code 100 and 83 while branch lines and yards can be Code 70 and even 55! I think this mimics what you'll find on the real prototype at least in the States. Have never seen a higher code used in the yard as opposed to the mainline but I guess there's a first time for everything.
 

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Dennis,

I very much agree

Never suggested that my answer to dwd was based on any prototype in the world.

My answer was based on the idea of: what shall I/we do with a large bag of code 100 points that have shown themselves to be inadequate for mainline service.

1.Throw them out and buy twenty + new points?

or

2. Lay them in yards, mix in code 75 and lay sand, ash and crap right up to the sleeper tops!

mmmmm

Got the idea from an American book about building and MPD.

Code 75 on a nice raised track bed
Code 100 sunken in the sh*t

TVBG
 

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Like others I have an investment in Code 100. I have looked at Code 75 & see little improvement.

Has Peco any stated or implied intention of reducing or withdrawing the Code 100 range now it has the Code 75?

I understand that not all my 70's/ 80's models will necessarily run on 75 but am I right in assuming that there is absolutely no reason to believe that all future stock will not run perfectly happily on Code 100?

Chris
 

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Off topic slightly, but has anyone experience of using Tillig track (Code 80?)?

In the current BRM there is an advertisement which quotes Tillig point kits at £7.60, which compares well to Hattons PECO points at £7-£9.

In the photo the Tillig point looks better than the PECO.

Regards

Paul
 

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I have tried the TILLIG Elite track as a trial for a large layout.
It's code 83, which is very close in scale to modern UK mainline rails.

In my opinion PECO is poor by comparison !!!!!


TILLIG track comes pre-weathered, and looks much finer than PECO code 75.
The real difference is the points, which have proper swinging switch blades rather than the toy-like hinges on PECO points. However, there is no over centre spring so latching point motors or Tortoise type motors are needed.

The range of points is better too.

Ok, it's still HO track, but so is PECO.
 

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Oakydoke:

Many thanks for the comments.

I'm about to help my son build his first layout and the Tillig point kits should be a good starting point for him!

Regards

Paul
 

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As a matter of interest, I noticed an advertisement in a model railway magazine, sale of P4 all steel coach wheels 12mm - are these wheels suitable for 00 coaches as in Hornby Mk3?
 

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Makemineadouble

I'll dig out my price list for TILLIG and check out some typical PECO pricing to compare.

There is only one UK outlet at the moment, INTERNATIONAL MODELS of Gwynedd, but they attend a number of exhibitions around the country (recently at Warley, Southampton and Harrogate), and are due to be at Alexandra Palace 1st & 2nd April.

Web site: International Models

The button for Tillig Elite HO track is on the left.

If you telephone, they are very friendly and are happy to give advice. Ask for a free TILLIG catalogue (I think you have to supply an A4 SAE.).

p.s. The sleepers look odd colours in the photos (concrete looks Green!!). Don't worry, they are actually normal looking when you see the real items.
 
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