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I am building my new layout with Peco code 75 bullhead track and have already laid several yards of it. (I like the little track joiners but they are fiddly.) I shall soon be at the stage of laying some of the points that go with it. Do they need any alteration like we were advised to do to the flat-bottomed ones? Three pairs of these points will form crossovers between parallel tracks. They are described as 'unifrog' so does this mean that each pair can be joined with metal joiners? If not then I will need to leave a gap as Peco do not supply insulating joiners for this type of track.

Thank you for any advice.

Robert
 

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Yes, gap them. We need some delicate plastic mouldings H shaped in plan to represent the fishplates, ideally moulded in a mucky grey
brown and offering good weathering treatment adhesion. Product opportunity there ...
 

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Good Heavens! You can tell I have purchased them in advance of laying, and other than tinkering to assess their bendability (very
good!) and a quick running trial unpowered have not actually deployed them yet.
 

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Following this thread, the thought crossed my mind that I was busy stashing these points for 'the scenic section that is to come' on the happy assumption that like all Peco track product utilised to date, they would be equally robust in service. Perhaps I ought to do some exchanges with the code 75 Streamline and test that assumption?

Being a lightning fast worker that was accomplished in Easter 2020, so they have since racked up a year in service. Trouble free, so all is likely well for their future permanent deployment...
 

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Now having obtained some of the new plain track, I have been experimenting with it over the weekend and like it very much. Even more flexible than the SMP bullhead I already had, so the easiest track that I have ever used when it comes to forming curves; and the deeper sleepers and very thin linkages make it easy to ballast so these are easily concealed while leaving a good clear air gap between the top of the ballast and the bottom of the rail. The effect is a very realistic representation of the appearance of bullhead track running lines.

I feel a dangerous temptation to represent the 60 foot panels when it comes to deploying it in earnest.
 

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I used some of the Peco bullhead track in my engine shed area, mixed with code 75 points (there aren't any 3-way bullhead ones yet). I found it a little delicate while handling it, but oncein place it sems robust enough to last.
 

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QUOTE (SRman @ 15 Jun 2021, 02:46) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>... I found it a little delicate while handling it...
Quite agree. I would suggest to anyone liking the sound of this track, but with no prior experience of laying flexible track, to start with the less demanding Streamline to build the skills. (All my off scene track is regular code 100, simply for economy, and it would be a rare layout that couldn't find a use for some, somewhere, so no money need be wasted.)

QUOTE (SRman)... once in place it seems robust enough to last.
This the factor that attracts me. From all my previous experience Peco's track lasts in service, trouble free. I have built relatively few layouts as operation is my primary interest: this last one is going to see me out, and should I happen to make really old bones that could mean thirty more years, and I truly want 'trouble free'...
 
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