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What do the experts use to repair plastic parts that have had an accident. It's been years since I have tackled this sort of problem. I still remember the airfix stuff, managed to get that everywhere in long thin strands.
Will the same glue hold a little lead weight inside a coach !
Is it just a case of buying some superglue or is there something a bit better.
Thanks
 

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be careful with super glue in coaching stock it will permanently mist each and every window. Rather try Epoxy I keep tooth picks for mixing and applying. My preferred mix is Prattleys this a South African product it comes in tubes and it's easy to mix a small quantity. You can also buy Devcon epoxy in similar type screw tubes. It has an advantage, you can vary cure time, and avoid too much waste. Epoxy provides a use for all those useless Lenz decoder boxes as they become great mixing area's.
 

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QUOTE (Smokeyone @ 4 Dec 2007, 06:01) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>What do the experts use to repair plastic parts that have had an accident. It's been years since I have tackled this sort of problem. I still remember the airfix stuff, managed to get that everywhere in long thin strands.
I assume by 'the airfix stuff' you mean their tubes of polystyrent cement. For polystyrene, Slater's Mek Pak liquid cement would be my choice. Easy to apply neatly with a brush, runs into the joint by capillary action, makes a strong bond, leaves surfaces clean and unmarked. Many RTR models have some or all moulded parts in ABS, on which Mek Pak does not really do that well. For this Butanone would be my choice, same method of application, but more care required as it is pretty aggressive toward surface finishes.

Regarding plastic glazing both these solvents should be kept off glazing. A little solvent on the frame, and insert the glazing while the plastic is still just tacky is one method.

Evostick is another good alternative, applied in small quantities using toothpicks or cocktail sticks. It is also very suitable for attaching ballast weights and the like. Used sparingly it makes a strong enough bond to be permanent, but not so strong that the bond cannot be broken should the need arise.
 

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I have found that Faller super expert polystyrene adhesive is very good for repairing plastic bodies and as it has a long spout you get the liquid exactly where you want it. It also works well for securing detail parts to bodyshells. I hope this is of some assistance.

regards
 

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I use Plastic Weld. It's a liquid glue like Met Pak and gles most plastics together. For those it won't, I use good quality superglue, carefully applied...
 

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The only thing that gives a strong permanent bond is two part epoxy adhesive. In my opinion superglue is massively overhyped. Polystyrene cement is fine for polystyrene, but are railway models made from it, or some other type of plastic? In my alter ego, as a plastic model kit builder, the experts recommend PVA glue for clear parts.
 
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